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The Gourmet Cookbook: More Than 1000 Recipes by Gourmet Magazine Editors and Ruth Reichl

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Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Charred tomatillo guacamole

    • L.Nightshade on January 18, 2012

      I made turkey tacos tonight, pulled this from the book for an accompaniment. Tomatillos go under the broiler until their tops are charred, then they are flipped and the bottoms are charred. Chopped red onion, serrano chiles, chopped cilantro, salt, and pepper are tossed together, then the tomatillos are added and mashed with a fork. Finally, avocados are added and mashed. I thought the 3-4 serranos called for would be too spicy, so I just used one serrano, one jalapeno, and one half a yellow chile. I could have used more, it tasted pretty mild. The charred tomatillos were a nice addition. My proportions were pretty random; no good sized avocados were available (the recipe calls for two large), so I used four very small avocados, with big seeds and not a lot of meat (fruit?). I would probably increase the ratio of the charred tomatillos next time, and add some more chiles.

  • Panko scallops with green chile chutney

    • dehrens on January 29, 2010

      try this chili recipe made with cocnut

  • Minestrone

    • Ladyberd on December 19, 2011

      I added some beef bouillon and smoked paprika and a little thyme and this soup was phenomenal.

  • Chinese beef noodle soup

    • bernalgirl on February 02, 2012

      Easy, delicious. I used cubed beef chuck roast and it still came out with a rich broth and tender meat. Short ribs are preferred but the chuck roast was faster.

  • Hearty goulash soup

    • Laura on April 16, 2011

      I chose this recipe as a means of using up the last of the beef stock I made this winter. Well, it accomplished that, but otherwise was a disappointment. It's a lot of work and just not that interesting. Flavors are pretty subdued. At the very least, I would increase the caraway seeds significantly -- they added the only real potent flavor, but there were so few of them that it was very hit or miss. I don't think I'll make this again.

  • Asian cucumber ribbon salad

    • L.Nightshade on January 18, 2012

      Not much to this. Thinly sliced cucumbers are tossed in rice vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, and sesame oil. I've got a funky old slicer, so my cukes weren't too pretty. But this tasted fine, and was a bright, refreshing accompaniment to the spicy steak main dish.

  • Gingered noodle salad with mango and cucumber

    • Laura on June 18, 2012

      Pg. 149. After reading the reviews of this on Epicurious, I made a few changes to the dressing. Used sesame oil, added some honey and soy sauce. This makes a light and refreshing dish for hot weather and made a nice accompaniment to grilled shrimp with a mango and pineapple salsa. But it wasn't good enough for me to want to make it again.

  • Sushi-roll rice salad

    • mirage on July 18, 2014

      Excellent quick and easy summer meal.

  • Crab Louis

    • debwfrank on February 13, 2010

      Added avocado. Skipped the olives. Quick, easy. BB favorite.

  • Orange cumin vinaigrette

    • Waderu on October 27, 2013

      Liked the flavor of this dressing, was great on earthy greens and roasted vegetables. Next time I will strain out the cumin seeds - they were too chewy.

  • Fresh tomato sauce

    • chawkins on December 03, 2013

      Made this with 6 pounds of the last of this season's tomato from the green house. The house was filled with the perfume of garlic, and wound up with 2 28-oz jars of garlicky sweet sauce.

  • Orecchiette with cauliflower and lacinato kale

    • Breadcrumbs on November 06, 2011

      Wonderful dish. One thing I did differently is that I roasted my cauliflower since it’s not mr bc’s favourite vegetables and, the only way I can seem to get him to eat is by roasting it!! Otherwise, I followed the recipe as you see it in the book and, since the dish was a little dry, I did add some of the cooking water from the kale along w a little pasta water. The toasted breadcrumbs and parmesan add a richness to the dish that contrasts the bitterness of the kale and balances everything. For folks who don’t love anchovies, I’d note that the flavour is very subtle and, not pronounced enough that the flavour stands out. This really was delicious and surprisingly filling. FYI, my cauliflower was chartreuse and purple in case you find my photos a bit puzzling!! I’d highly recommend this one. Loved the heat from the chilies too btw.

  • Perciatelli with sausage ragu and meatballs

    • Breadcrumbs on November 06, 2011

      p. 222 - Since preparing it we’ve had the meatballs as part of the pasta dish and, on their own w some sauce as an antipasti. Both were outstanding, I’d highly recommend this dish. You could easily make the meatballs and even the entire sauce a day ahead if time was tight. Meatballs are made by combining fresh breadcrumbs, milk, ground toasted almonds, currants, ground beef, pecorino, pine nuts, cinnamon, egg and salt. While the recipe suggests you fry these, I decided to bake them (20 mins in a 375 oven) while I cooked the sausage for the sauce. Instead of leaving the sausages whole, I cut them into 1 1/2 inch pieces to mimic the rough size/shape of the meatballs. I worried that the sauce might be too acidic or, watery w 2 cups of wine and only 28 oz of tomatoes but the sweet flavours of the sausage and currants really infused the sauce with wonderful flavours and by the time the dish was ready, the sauce was a lovely consistency (though I wish there had been more).

  • Sicilian meatballs

    • Breadcrumbs on November 06, 2011

      p. 222 - See review for Perciatelli with sausage ragu and meatballs as these are a component of that dish. Truly scrumptious and, reminiscent of the meatballs we so love at Quartino in Chicago.

  • Baked pasta with tomatoes, shiitake mushrooms, and prosciutto

    • Breadcrumbs on November 07, 2011

      p. 225 - We loved this dish not just for what it is but for the possibilities it offers. First of all, on its own, as written it’s a very tasty, hearty dish that could feed an army! I can also imagine how wonderful variations might be - cooked, shredded chicken or sausage instead of prosciutto. Instead of removing the cooked veggies from the pan to make a roux, I simply made my roux in a separate pan while the veggies cooked then incorporated the milk to make a smooth, creamy sauce. I also decided to add the tomatoes AND their juice the book tells you to drain them to the mushroom mixture and let it reduce a little prior to incorporating the cream sauce. At this point I let the sauce cool and refrigerated it overnight. The following day all I needed to do was cook the pasta, bring the sauce up to a simmer, stir in the cheeses, prosciutto and pasta then bake for 20 minutes. Terrific dish I'll happily make again.

  • Butternut squash and hazelnut lasagne

    • hillsboroks on November 07, 2014

      This is one of my favorite fall dishes. The squash, hazelnuts, herbs and cheeses all compliment one another beautifully. I never use the oven ready lasagne and instead just boil regular lasagne noodles per the package directions. I think using fresh herbs if you have them really makes this a special dish.

    • L.Nightshade on January 18, 2012

      A couple modifications were made with this recipe. I was a bit too exuberant in making ravioli filling the other night, so I found this recipe, which seemed compatible, and added a layer of my leftover squash and Italian chicken sausage mixture to the other ingredients called for. Mr. Nightshade made fresh pasta sheets which we used instead of the oven-ready sheets called for. Other than those changes, we followed the recipe and made layers of pasta, bechamel, squash, onions, hazelnuts, and cheeses. This was very good lasagne. I thought the toasted hazelnuts added a nice texture, and the flavor combined nicely with the squash and cheeses. After enjoying a slice for lunch today, I can attest that this lasagne is even a little bit better the next day.

  • Beef and sausage lasagne

    • Breadcrumbs on November 06, 2011

      p. 234 - This is relatively simple lasagna to prepare relative to other versions I’ve made. There is little chopping and prep to do and, the recipe calls for no boil lasagna noodles. I used a larger pan to accommodate the volume of sauce in this dish. I also added steamed, drained spinach to the ricotta. The idea is to layer sauce, noodles, ricotta mixture, Parmesan and repeat the process 3 times. My version repeated the layers twice then, after the third layer of noodles were added, I simply topped w more sauce, some mozzarella and a little Parmesan. I also distributed the mozzarella evenly throughout the layers vs just having what I imagined to be a big gooey blob on top of the dish. Once assembled, the pan is covered with a buttered piece of foil. I sprayed mine w evoo instead. I had to put the broiler on to brown the top. This was good, actually leftovers were great. The sum far greater than the parts. Delicious and worth repeating.

  • Risotto with peas and prosciutto

    • Laura on April 11, 2011

      Pg. 255. This is a lovely spring dish and very tasty. It's a very simple recipe and doesn't take too long to make. The constant stirring can make your arm feel very tired -- but then you expect that with risotto.

  • Escarole, sausage, and white bean stew

    • chawkins on November 07, 2014

      Soupier, with tomato added and a little bit spicier than the version from the Fine Cooking special issue for One-Pot Meals.

  • Pickled black-eyed peas

    • Laurendmck on October 04, 2010

      otherwise known as Texas Caviar

  • Cod marinated in sake kasu

    • sherrib on August 13, 2014

      This recipe yields a lot of marinade that fully covers the fish. I left the fish marinating for about 20 hours. The recipe specifically states to make sure to use black cod for this recipe since regular cod won't do. I used regular cod anyway and although it fell apart a bit during cooking, it tasted just fine. Instead of Sake Kasu, I used regular, bottled sake that I had on hand. The marinated fish takes on a beautiful and very tasty brown exterior. Next time, I might cook the marinade in a saucepan to reduce and use it over the fish. It's a shame to discard it as the recipe suggests since it's really delicious! The only other change I might make is to cook the fish from beginning to end in the oven. I don't know if it's because of the type of cod I used or if it's because I let it marinate for so long, but the fish was extremely flaky and falling apart as I turned the fillets over.

  • Fish en papillote with tomatoes and olives

    • L.Nightshade on November 26, 2011

      Page 302. I was quite impressed with the taste of this dish. The orange zest imparts a lot of flavor to the fish, just by sitting there on top (I kept it in large coils). It was a lovely combination with the olives and tomato. Plus a hint of bite from the chile flakes. Definitely a great, do-again after-work meal. I served it with Peas with Spinach and Shallots on page 555.

  • Crabmeat-stuffed sole

    • Cheri on January 05, 2010

      Bake for 10 min covered with foil then top with bread crumbs and uncover and bake 10 min more at 450 deg. Used Red pepper instead of yellow. Yum. Served with lemon broccoli and rice.

  • Pan-roasted mahimahi with butter and lime

    • JoanN on September 13, 2011

      Couldn't be simpler. Definitely on the do-again list.

  • Portuguese clams

    • chawkins on June 05, 2013

      We loved this. I halved the recipe to serve two, instead of using 1 lb of clams, I used 17 clams, probably way over two pounds, but that was what fitted in one layer on the bottom of my pan. You put the clams and half of the onions slices on the bottom of the pan, seasoned them and drizzled oil on them, then layered on the half of the garlic, the rest of the onion, the tomato slices, the roasted pepper strips and the rest of the garlic, poured in the wine, added the potatoes (I sliced them to about 1/8"), poured in the tomato sauce and layered on the chorizo, then covered and bring to a boil. I was somewhat leary of the 12 minute cooking time as I did not think the potatoes would be done, but everything turned out well, the potatoes were soft and the clams not overcooked. Very, very good, will make again when I have fresh clams.

  • Chicken with cornmeal dumplings

    • L.Nightshade on November 05, 2011

      A whole chicken is cut up and browned, then sprinkled with a cup of shallots, and white wine. When the chicken is cooked, it is fished out and put into the oven while the cornmeal dumplings (with parsley, chives, and buttermilk) cook in the gravy. Mr. Nightshade and I worked on this dish together, and had a lot of fun doing it. We spent the better part of two hours (including our side dish), and we felt it was worth it. Mr. NS raved, thought it was a company-worthy dish. I thought it was more old-fashioned comfort food for family (I brought out my grandma's china to serve, it seemed fitting). I did love the dumplings. Cornmeal and fresh herbs give them an interesting little punch. We'll put this into our regular rotation.

  • Chicken pie with biscuit crust

  • Turkey meat loaf

    • Breadcrumbs on September 19, 2011

      p. 387 - I was looking for a recipe that called for cremini mushrooms and stumbled across this dish. What a happy find, we loved this meatloaf!! Mr bc, not a fan of meatloaf at all, declared this to be delicious as he headed for second helpings. I thought the mushrooms really took this dish from good to great. The loaf was tender, juicy and full of flavour. I used ground chicken instead of turkey, otherwise I followed the recipe to the letter. Seeing the "yuck" review above made me wonder if we'd just been lucky and perhaps this doesn't work as well w turkey but I just checked Epi and reviews there seem largely very positive w 3.5 stars. I'll make this again and would happily recommend.

    • mirage on June 26, 2010

      Susan and Nancy each made this. Both said "yuck"

  • Herbed rib roast

    • chawkins on May 08, 2012

      The herb mixture is a little bit too salty for my taste, I'll reduce the amount salt next time.

  • Brisket a la carbonnade

    • jumali on September 14, 2010

      This ran a little dry for me--I kept having to add liquid during the last 1 1/2 hours. Maybe start with two bottles of beer?

  • Flank steak with chimichurri

    • Reemski on September 19, 2010

      Recipe is on page 429. I used rocket/arugula instead of parsley and added a tiny bit of sweet smoked paprika and some freshly ground pepper to the chimmichurri. It was delicious

    • BookishMa on December 14, 2011

      Quick & easy & delicious. I'd suggest increasing the rub by a third--we had a long narrow strip that wasn't completely covered. But it was delicious (even our picky 9 year old raved about it)

  • Skirt steak fajitas with lime and black pepper

    • lizard on March 11, 2011

      The steak marinade is simple and delicious.

  • Beef stroganoff

    • JKDLady on October 17, 2012

      This is my son's favorite beef stroganoff recipe. It's also simple and lower in calories than most.

  • Island pork tenderloin

    • L.Nightshade on January 18, 2012

      Delicious! The taste is sweet and spicy, a lovely combination. Plus, I really liked this method of cooking the tenderloin. We usually grill it, weather permitting. But during rainy, blustery times like this, the quick sear and the oven finish is the way to go. I'd definitely use this method again with different spice treatments. But I'll also keep this exact recipe in my do-again list. I sliced up the leftover tenderloin and used it in pressed sandwiches. Added a couple paper-thin slices of ham, muenster cheese, and a mixture of cilantro, parsley, garlic, and pickled jalapenos. I cooked them on a grill pan under a brick. The sweetness of the pork marinade coupled quite nicely with the spicy herb relish.

    • lizard on February 02, 2011

      Simple and delicious. Best w/ whole tenderloin.

  • Cider-braised pork shoulder with caramelized onions

    • BookishMa on December 08, 2011

      A very subtle flavor to this that beautifully complements the taste of the pork. We used a boneless cut from our farm share (happy pigs, no drugs, kept outside, foraging under trees) and were very pleased.

  • Pork chops with mustard crumbs

    • chawkins on July 25, 2014

      Simple, quick and delicious for the effort put in. Took no more than 30 minutes, including a walk out to the garden for the sage leaves. Used regular bread crumbs rather than rye bread crumbs because that's what I had. Also mixed in with some panko because I went out of the regular bread crumbs as well.

  • Mustard- and herb-crusted rack of lamb

    • chawkins on October 18, 2014

      Tasted good but it took a lot longer than called for to get to the internal temp for medium rare.

  • Grilled butterflied leg of lamb with lemon, herbs, and garlic

    • Jane on August 01, 2010

      Very quick and easy way to cook a leg of lamb. Needs to marinate for an hour before cooking but actual prep and cooking time is low. Served it sliced in pita bread with Zucchini raita from Gourmet Today.

    • Laura on July 18, 2012

      Pg. 502. We loved this! A one-hour marinade with very simple to prepare herbs -- I didn't have rosemary, so I'm sure it would be even better with that. A very short time on the grill. Served with grilled baby potatoes and an herb salad. Couldn't be simpler. The best part? We have leftovers!

  • Green beans with almonds

    • BookishMa on December 25, 2011

      Too many nuts! I liked the idea but the end result wasn't great

  • Roasted carrots and parsnips with herbs

    • BookishMa on April 22, 2013

      Easy preparation and delicious--even our 11year old liked it. I used the recipe as a template, adding chopped green beans, an onion and a few cloves of garlic. We ran out of olive oil at 1T so I supplemented by spraying the pan and the veges with olive oil spray. Dried herbs worked just fine

  • Sautéed kale with bacon and vinegar

    • beetlebug on July 11, 2011

      Excellent and easy dish. Bacon and greens, what more do you need?

  • Roasted okra

    • pagesinthesun on August 30, 2014

      I've used this recipe to roast okra for years. It is the best way to introduce okra-virgins to the vegetable. No slime!

  • Peas with spinach and shallots

    • L.Nightshade on January 18, 2012

      Not much to write, garlic and shallots are sauteed, peas are added, then baby spinach, a dash of salt and pepper. A perfectly tasty, and pretty green dish. It was a nice, simple counterpoint to the fish dish I was serving with olives and tomatoes. A colorful plate when all was put together.

  • Parsley-leaf potatoes

    • Breadcrumbs on October 23, 2011

      p. 568 - If you're looking under "Potatoes" in the index this recipe is listed under Wedges, not Golden so it's a bit hard to find (especially if you haven't had your morning coffee yet!!). This is a basic recipe for roasting. No par-boiling, just slice, toss w evoo, S&P and optionals garlic or rosemary then bake at 425.

  • Cheddar- and garlic-stuffed potatoes

    • Breadcrumbs on November 06, 2011

      Cheddar – and Garlic –Stuffed Potatoes – p. 571 Doesn’t this just sound yummy!!?? With a new bbq on the deck we couldn’t resist grilling some steaks and what goes better with grilled steak but a delicious baked potato? This recipe fit the bill and took the ordinary to the extraordinary . . . . a truly scrumptious treat! Easy to make, potatoes are first roasted off along w a head of garlic. Pulp from garlic is mixed together with the potato innards, butter, sour cream and cheddar. Mixture is seasoned to taste before stuffing into potato shells, topping w additional cheese and baking for approx 20 mins. Yum! We’ll definitely have these again, everyone raved about them and I’d like to experiment with different cheeses.

    • L.Nightshade on January 18, 2012

      Inspired by Breadcrumbs post, and a dish full of leftover mashed potatoes, I did a spin on this recipe. I took the mashed potatoes and smooshed them up with the other called-for ingredients, plopped them into a baking dish and cooked as directed. Mine got steamy-melty hot without the beautiful browning visible on Breadcrumbs individual potatoes, but they tasted fine.This was a pretty tasty way to chip away at the mountain of mashed potatoes we have left.

  • Baked breaded acorn squash

    • Cheri on November 25, 2010

      This is easy and very good. 20 minutes after the Turkey comes out of the oven. Skin is edible.

  • Roasted squash and green beans with sherry soy butter

    • L.Nightshade on November 05, 2011

      As I read the recipe, the beans are supposed to be cooked on the stovetop until tender, then added to the roasting squash for 20 minutes. I'll have to try it that way some time, but it sounds like it might be overkill. Because the oven was in use I did the beans on the stovetop only, roasted the squash beforehand. The seasoning for the vegetables is provided by butter melted with sherry vinegar and soy sauce. The butter nicely cuts the bite of the vinegar and makes for an interesting combination. This is a very November dish, it was a fine accompaniment to the Chicken with Cornmeal Dumplings.

  • Maple mashed sweet potatoes

    • schenck65 on October 16, 2011

      I've made this 3 or 4 years running for Thanksgiving. It's simple, delicious and reheatable. Good with purple sweet potatoes, too.

    • Breadcrumbs on November 06, 2011

      Maple Mashed Sweet Potatoes – p. 582 I planned to make some cider-glazed grilled pork chops and while in search of a side dish, I found this recipe via an EYB search. I was drawn to the simplicity and, complimentary flavours of this potato dish and we were really pleased with the results. These creamy, maple-infused potatoes paired perfectly with the grilled pork and, were a real hit with our guests. Prep is simple. Potatoes are baked until tender then, halved and the flesh is scooped into a bowl and mashed along w butter, cream, syrup, salt and pepper. RR notes that the potatoes can be made ahead and reheated and I’d have been happy to give this a try if there had been leftovers. As it turned out, every last bite of these potatoes were gobbled up and our Golden Retriever was all too happy to lick out the serving dish!!! Why I invested in a new dishwasher I’ll never know!!! Great side dish, happy to recommend this one!!

  • Coconut and macadamia nut banana bread

    • MWFhome on March 12, 2014

      Best banana bread, lemony and nutty

  • Flourless peanut butter cookies

    • dehrens on December 23, 2009

      Gluten Free

  • Cranberry pistachio biscotti

    • Reemski on July 09, 2010

      Tried to halve recipe as it's very large. Used two eggs, but dough still didn't come together, I had to add water. Ok recipe, not great.

  • Cranberry caramel bars

    • BookishMa on December 14, 2011

      Despite the fact that my candy thermometer was off (by 30 degrees!) these are AWESOME. Butter, sugar, cranberries and pecans with a shortbread crust. I used Lyle's Golden Syrup rather than light corn syrup. Generally, I don't add chocolate to desserts (love it on its own) but I thought I'd try it: I dabbed it on and it increased the swoon factor by 80%. I'll make it again but next time I'll use a working thermometer (my bars are a bit runny but still yummy)

  • Rhubarb anise upside-down cake

    • Breadcrumbs on July 04, 2011

      p. 717 - I picked up a couple of pounds of beautiful MacDonald Rhubarb at the farmer's market on Saturday with this cake in mind. The idea of pairing rhubarb w anise seed seemed like a match made in heaven and, as fans of both, I knew this would be a hit at our house. The cake is baked in a cast iron skillet which adds to its rusticity and appeal in my view. Prep is simple and straightforward w the most challenging (read . . . keep your fingers crossed!!) element being the actual plating. Happy to report that no fruit was left behind in the inverted plating of this dish!! The tangy juices of the rhubarb blend beautifully w the buttery-sugar topping to infuse the cake with moisture and flavour. The anise really elevates this dish. Happy to recommend this one. Photos here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/793239#6653539

  • All-occasion yellow cake

    • alisonkc on March 16, 2014

      This is a make-from-scratch version of boxed yellow cake mix. Light and airy texture, tasty and not much more difficult than the box mix!

  • Coconut cake with lime curd

    • Laurendmck on December 16, 2010

      Fabulous! Made this for Easter 4/10 with the Esty family

  • Nectarine mousse cake

    • Kringler on October 14, 2013

      Fabulous! A bit of a production, but results are worth it. It is just as delicious as it is beautiful. Perfect ending to a special summer dinner party.

  • Chocolate cake with orange buttercream

    • Laurendmck on February 20, 2010

      Our wedding cake!

  • Pecan pumpkin pie

    • chawkins on November 02, 2014

      What a great idea to combine two great pies together, the two layers complement each other well. The pecan layer is not as sweet as regular pecan pie and the unusual addition of lemon juice cuts the richness. I used my own oil pie crust and 2 tsp of lemon juice instead of 1 1/2 tsp. I might not have baked it long enough though, the center of the pecan layer was not quite set when cut into 6 hours after baking.

  • Berry tart with mascarpone cream

    • Jane on June 26, 2009

      Fabulous dessert for summer parties. I made this for a friend's birthday lunch and it was loved by everyone. It's easy to make, looks impressive and tastes delicious. The only negative was that a lot of the glaze on the berries ran off the sides of the tart before it had set.

  • Berries with orange and sour cream shortcake

    • MWFhome on May 24, 2014

      This is a WOW dessert! Made it with strawberries, raspberries and blueberries, macerated per the recipe adding a little Grand Marnier liqueur. For the biscuit, I used a cup all purpose and 1/2 cup white whole wheat flour; substituted non-fat yogurt for the sour cream; and added a small amount of fresh orange juice to the milk, adding enough to make a sticky dough (more than 1/2 cup liquid). I added a little candied ginger chopped to the biscuit dough. To the whipped cream, I added some simulated sour cream (adding kefir to half-and-half cream), and no sugar. Then we poured some Grand Marnier on the biscuit when serving. Results were superb!! I would make for company anytime.

  • Blueberry and nectarine buckle

  • Tahini sauce

    • Breadcrumbs on November 06, 2011

      p. 811 – Lately we’ve been highly addicted to roasted cauliflower. Hot or cold, as a side or an antipasti, we just can’t seem to get enough of this tasty treat. Inspired by the goodhealthgourmet who mentioned on another thread that she likes dipping roasted in Tahini sauce I thought I’d give that a try and, was happy to find a recipe in the COTM. This really couldn’t be simpler. Garlic cloves are minced and mashed to a paste with salt before whisking together with tahini, lemon juice, water, olive oil, cilantro (I used Italian parsley) and cumin. This was truly lovely with the roasted cauliflower and I used what was leftover to drizzle over grilled salmon the following day with equally impressive results. A versatile recipe well worth keeping and repeating.

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  • ISBN 10 0618374086
  • ISBN 13 9780618374083
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Sep 28 2004
  • Format Hardcover
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH)
  • Imprint Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH)

Publishers Text

For beginners and seasoned cooks alike, The Gourmet Cookbook is an eloquent, essential companion in the kitchen - one that will take its place among the classic cookbooks of our generation. Under the discerning eye of the celebrated authority Ruth Reichl, the editors of America's premier cooking magazine sifted through more than 60,000 recipes published over the past six decades. Testing, tasting, and cross-testing to ensure that every cook achieves the same superb results, they selected more than 1000 recipes.

The Gourmet Cookbook is encyclopedic but eminently accessible. With it, cooks can go back to the days when Beef Wellington ruled the table or prepare something as contemporary as Crispy Artichoke Flowers with Salsa Verde. Those in a hurry who want simple dinners with flavor and flair will find hundreds of possibilities, including Seared Salmon with Balsamic Glaze and Skirt Steak Fajitas with Lime and Black Pepper. At the same time, The Gourmet Cookbook is the perfect volume for entertaining, full of adventurous recipes for special occasions: Blini with Three Caviars, Fragrant Crispy Duck, and Tiramisu Ice Cream Cake.

Throughout the book you'll find hundreds of valuable tips from Gourmet's eight test kitchens. Illustrated instructions explain everything from how to cut up a chicken to how to shuck an oyster.



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The Gourmet Cookbook: More Than 1000 Recipes

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