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Cookbook store profile - featuring Book Larder in Seattle

April 23 2014, 0 Comments

An extensive cookbook collection combines with cooking classes, demonstrations, and author signings to develop a sense of community at this Seattle cookbook store... read more

Does local and seasonal produce always taste better?

April 22 2014, 3 Comments

Not surprisingly, perception plays a major role... read more

Cookbooks as teachers

April 22 2014, 3 Comments

How often do we really learn new skills around the kitchen...and what books teach us the most?... read more

Skimping on shrimp

April 21 2014, 3 Comments

A spike in shrimp prices has led to restaurants raising prices and removing menu items... read more

Uses for leftover Easter eggs that aren't all devilish

April 20 2014, 3 Comments

Hard-boiled eggs are used in many recipes from soup to dessert... read more

Coconut and spring

April 19 2014, 0 Comments

Searching for the reason coconut is popular during Easter and Passover... read more

The power of positive thinking

April 18 2014, 1 Comment

What you think about your food can fool your body... read more

I made a deconstructed version of this dish, just plopping the ingredients into the pan without turning them into a paste. No flour, no sugar (we don't do carbs). As made, it was delicious, and I'm sure it would be even better if I followed the recipe as written.
by mcvl about Salmon steaks in chraimeh sauce from Jerusalem
Sometimes you crave the simple and mildly sweet glazed carrots with western style steaks. Like the style of 60's-70's. This was perfect for those occasions. Carrots are not much used unless in soups, stews or salads and this is still a classic way of serving them as a side dish. Very good recipe but I did cut back on butter. It was too much the way it was written.
by Rinshin about Glazed carrots from Junior League Celebration Cookbook
LOTS of recipes for making your own homemade cheese alternatives! This book will make vegans very happy, along with those who observe kashrut and need pareve alternatives to cheese and other dairy products. If you like this book you'll also love "Artisan Vegan Cheese," which that also has many recipes for non-dairy cheeses, some cultured, others not, and some of which have the melt and stretch properties of real cheese. Between the two books you're bound to find replacements for cheese that you really like and are much less expensive than store-bought. Also check out "The Gentle Chef Cookbook," by the author of the "Formulary," which has a wide range of vegan recipes for making flavorful homemade meat substitutes from soy, seitan, etc. and recipes for using them in dishes that many may long for! The author is a trained chef, so his recipes are authentic and well-seasoned and respectful if the original versions. Enjoy!
by robm about Non-Dairy Formulary
LOTS of recipes for making your own homemade cheese alternatives! This book will make vegans very happy, along with those who observe kashrut and need pareve alternatives to cheese and other dairy products. If you like this book you'll also love "The Non-Dairy Formulary," a newer book that also has many recipes for non-dairy cheeses, some cultured, others not, and some of which have the melt and stretch properties of real cheese. Between the two books you're bound to find replacements for cheese that you really like and are much less expensive than store-bought.
by robm about Artisan Vegan Cheese
Good & easy (and vegetarian), but not that special. It's pretty difficult to check the doneness of the eggs, as a firm skin forms quickly and you can't really tell what's underneath.
by wester about Baked eggs with spinach and mushrooms from Smitten Kitchen
I fudged it a little by starting with regular chicken stock, to which I added the pork neck bones and the other aromatics. I only had about 1.5 hours and wanted to make sure I had a flavourful base, hence the augmented chicken stock cheat. That said, it worked very well, yielding a lovely broth with hints of ginger and herbs and was quite substantial with the rice and pork balls. I didn't do the eggs however as the suggested method of poaching in a small container yielded a barely cooked egg. In future I would just do soft boiled eggs the traditional way.
by Delys77 about Thai rice soup (Khao tom) from Pok Pok
This wasn't too popular with the kiddos, they prefer traditional pancakes. I thought it was a bit too eggy.
by westminstr about The mysterious David Dares pancake from In the Kitchen with a Good Appetite
This is a great recipe. The coconut rice is so delicious. I cooked it on the stove-top and needed to add an extra 1/4 water for perfect texture. Next time I will try it with a frozen cube of creamed coconut instead of boxed coconut cream. The pork was very good but took longer to cook than stated in recipe. I had to spread the cooking time over two days. That said, it was delicious. It is intensely sweet and salty so a little goes a long way. The som tam is so good, it just blew my mind that I made it myself in my own kitchen. Very authentic flavor, much better than the Americanized versions found at most restaurants.
by westminstr about Papaya salad with coconut rice and sweet pork (Khao man som tam) from Pok Pok
If I could give this recipe 6 stars I would. Loved it. However, I will add an extra chile next time.
by westminstr about Central Thai-style papaya salad (Som tam Thai) from Pok Pok
I did not make the turkey meatballs. I just used Trader Joe's turkey meatballs, cut into eights each, a box of whole wheat penne, which turned out to be only 12 ounces, 2 pints of homed canned tomato sauce, the called for amount of mozzarella and Romano and about 14 oz of ricotta. I assembled the casserole and was ready to bake it when I was informed that my husband had to work late and won't be home for dinner. So it went in the fridge overnight and became dinner the following night. I had to bake it for a whole hour (doubled the called for time) on my counter-top oven to get it bubbly all over. Quite good, not as cheesy as some other baked ziti I've made.
by chawkins about Baked ziti with turkey meatballs from Epicurious
I was low on breadcrumbs so mixed some polenta with the breadcrumbs I had. It worked well!
by pennyvr about Easy arancini from Gordon Ramsay's Ultimate Cookery Course
Looking for ways to use a heap of coriander I thought I'd try this. The flavour is great but when Mr Malouf says it's hot he's not kidding around. I only used 3 bullet chillies and it was super hot, proceed with caution. That said I loved it!
by KarinaFrancis about Zhoug from Moorish
I had heaps of leftover coriander and made the dipping sauce to go with some ribs and it was punchy and really cut through the fatty pork. I made a second batch to see how it would freeze and it didn't lose much in the process..
by KarinaFrancis about Siew yuk with chilli and coriander relish from Two Asian Kitchens
Latin Burger with Chipotle-Lime Barbecue Sauce, p 98. Basically, this is a turkey burger that is brushed in olive oil and barbecue sauce and then grilled. You serve the burgers with extra barbecue sauce. I liked this ok, but I screwed up the barbecue sauce so can't give a really fair review. The recipe calls for 6 to 8 chipotle chiles in adobo sauce to taste. The problem is, I just added 8 chipotles and lots of adobo sauce without tasting. The chipotle totally overwhelmed the sauce. I couldn't really get much of the lime or sweetness. I'll probably try this again. Next time, I will start with 4 chipotles and add them one at a time,
by stockholm28 about Isabel's Cantina
Corbitt was the famed food director for Neiman-Marcus and rather ahead of her time in bringing fine cooking and cuisine to Middle America. She wrote numerous cookbooks in her own inimitable style and this is an extensive compilation of her best and most popular recipes. In addition to her professional cooking, Corbitt entertained constantly at home. These recipes still work and mostly are surprisingly uncomplicated while still yielding elegant results. Corbitt deserves to be better remembered. She could be thought of as the female James Beard, proselytizing for good food at a time before America truly became food crazy!
by robm about Helen Corbitt Collection
I'm naturally suspicious of culinary greatest hits cookbooks, typically packed with shortcuts and substitutions that don't do justice to the originals, but there's a lot of value in this compendium.
by The Star-Ledger about Cooking Light Global Kitchen   -  full review
...a farm-to-table restaurant and grocery store in rural Mississippi, peppers the cookbook (the recipes are from her chef Dixie Grimes) with tales of other entrepreneurial pioneers in the deep South.
by The Star-Ledger about B.T.C. Old-Fashioned Grocery Cookbook   -  full review
Another Brooklyn hipster cookbook? You won't care when you take a gander at the shop's...Stout and Pretzels ice cream, dark chocolate mixed with Guinness and chopped chocolate-covered pretzels.
by The Star-Ledger about Ample Hills Creamery   -  full review
The cookbook is very friendly to vegetarians and the gluten-sensitive; her flourless tangerine-apricot cake, made with ground almonds and pistachios, is not to be missed.
by The Star-Ledger about Olives, Lemons & Za'atar   -  full review
The texture was almost like a cheesecake. Dense, creamy & lemony but with a sweet and sour topping of caramel and caramelised lemons. It’s brought out the gluttons in us & was all gone in one sitting!
by Great British Chefs about Lebanese lemon and vanilla cake from Mighty Spice Cookbook   -  full review
It really was one of the easiest dinners I have ever made. The nuts make the broth rich and thick. We were all licking and slurping the mussel shells to make sure none of it was wasted!
by Great British Chefs about Malay yellow mussel curry from Mighty Spice Cookbook   -  full review
...a version that took me right back to a tiny street vendor in Delhi. A lovely fresh and fragrant lunchtime snack!
by Great British Chefs about Chana masala from Mighty Spice Cookbook   -  full review
...vary from easy to medium in complexity and cater to all year round cooking, with Spring dishes such as Roasted Leg of Lamb to Christmas Cake. ...easy to follow and beautifully photographed...
by Great British Chefs about Recipes from My Mother for My Daughter   -  full review
I loved this book. It has speedy, tasty and healthy recipes for everyday meals with simple spice mixes. It also brings back lovely memories of my own travels.
by Great British Chefs about Mighty Spice Cookbook   -  full review
But here the book is another vegetable win, by demonstrating dishes and techniques that make meat less of a main event, and more of a faithful compliment to gorgeous vegetables.
by Great British Chefs - Blog Recipes about Taste of Home: 200 Quick and Easy Recipes   -  full review
The Pitt Cue Co. cookbook is an excellent definitive guide to sourcing, cooking and serving barbecue food, with recipes that should be in every host’s repertoire. A meat lovers dream.
by Great British Chefs about Pitt Cue Co.: The Cookbook   -  full review
This colourful and easy to follow book is dedicated to reinventing French bistro food, adding a contemporary twist to many classic, well-loved dishes.
by Great British Chefs about Mange Tout   -  full review
With page after page of glorious dishes...celebrates the rich culinary heritage of Britain, providing more than enough evidence that British food consists of a lot more than fish and chips.
by Great British Chefs about Gilbert Scott Book of British Food   -  full review
...packed with recipes for neglected fish; brill, megrim, witch, gurnard, rays and sardines. ...his recipes are both complex and layered. This is what makes them exciting.
by Great British Chefs about Nathan Outlaw's British Seafood   -  full review
...a real eye-opener and forces you to view cookery in a new light. It's fascinating to discover a lesser-known cuisine ... a must read for anyone wishing to broaden their culinary horizons.
by Great British Chefs about D.O.M   -  full review

    Improve your cooking skills with EYB's new feature

    February 27 2014, 6 Comments

    We have added a filter for all how-to recipes and videos indexed on EYB... more

    What's New on EYB

    February 27 2014, 6 Comments

    We have added a filter for all how-to recipes and videos indexed on EYB... more

    Shelf Life With Susie

    April 22 2014, 3 Comments

    How often do we really learn new skills around the kitchen...and what books teach us the most?... more

    Author Articles

    April 14 2014, 0 Comments

    The chicken may have come first, but Michael Ruhlman's latest cookbook is all about the egg... more