Hello! My Name is Tasty - Review, recipe and giveaway

Hello! My Name Is Tasty: Global Diner Favorites from Portland's Tasty Restaurants by John Gorham and Liz Crain is absolutely brilliant. When I look through this book, the thought bubble above my head shows me frolicking (I haven't frolicked in years) through a field of wild flowers counting the ways I love it. Gorgeous photographs, the best straight up must make and eat food ever, spectacular content including historical tidbits and so much more. These folks rocked this book.

Gorham's first cookbook, Toro Bravo, shared the recipes from his tapas style restaurant of the same name. The recipes from the wildly successful Tasty n Sons (the chef and his partner in the restaurant have no sons - this name was an homage to old Brooklyn where so many family businesses were named & Sons) and Tasty n Adler restaurants in Portland were the impetus for this book. The chef states in the introduction that he was on a ten day road trip from D.C. to Savannah (while writing this book) to gather inspiration for both the book and his menus and also to revisit his past. The recipes in Hello! My Name is Tasty reflect the South, the world and all its cuisine, and the chef's own brillance. Yes, again - I use a derivative of the word brilliant. John, if you need my address for a box of those chicken biscuits - call me. 

The authors start the book with Tasty A to Z's - with tips that stress using the best, high quality ingredients you can procure for instance Valrhona chocolate, pure maple syrup. Housemade Tasty bacon, homemade cottage cheese with pineapple jam, kimchi, mustards - all are included. There is a lovely photographic spread of how to make a proper food board - Southern board, breakfast board, smoked trout, pickle board - along with all the recipes for those type of components.

Korean fried chicken, Burmese red pork stew, a Molten butterscotch cake that I would slap your mama for (mine is no longer with us), Toro Bravo milkshake and every other recipe in this book begs to be made and enjoyed. The recipes are pure comfort, high octane deliciousness and totally approachable.

Special thanks to the publisher, Sasquatch, and the authors for sharing the recipe for Lemon ricotta pancakes with our members today. The publisher is also offering three copies of this tasty title in our contest below.

Lemon ricotta pancakes with blackberry jam

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MAKES 4 ½ CUPS OF BATTER, FOR ABOUT 18 SMALL PANCAKES

  • 1 1⁄4 cup all-purpose flour

  • 1⁄2 cup almond flour

  • 1⁄4 cup plus 8 teaspoons sugar, divided

  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 3⁄4 teaspoon kosher salt

  • 1 cup Ricotta (recipe follows) or store-bought
  • 1 1⁄2 cups whole milk
  • 2 egg yolks

  • Zest from 1 ½ lemons

  • 4 egg whites

  • 2 to 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 2 ¼ cups warm Blackberry Jam (recipe follows), for serving

Maple syrup, for serving

Sift the flours, 1⁄4 cup of the sugar, baking powder, and kosher salt one at a time into a large bowl, making sure there are no lumps. Give it a quick whisk to make sure everything is evenly distributed and set aside.

In a medium bowl, fold the ricotta and 4 teaspoons of the sugar together, making sure not to break up the ricotta too much. You want to have some bigger chunks in the pancakes eventually. Set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk the milk, egg yolks, and lemon zest until fully incorporated and set aside. 

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whisk the egg whites with the remaining 4 teaspoons sugar on medium-low speed until they form medium-stiff peaks. Keep an eye on this because you can overmix it.

Gently fold the dry ingredients into the milk mixture until combined. Add the ricotta mixture and fold gently (you want some nice big chunks). Finally, fold in the egg whites until just incorporated.

NOTE:  Do not overmix this batter and activate the gluten. The key to a good pancake is not letting the gluten get tight- you want the pancakes fluffy.

Preheat a griddle to 350 degrees F, or place a large, well-seasoned cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Melt 1 tablespoon of butter until slightly browned, adding more as needed between batches.

Measure 1⁄4 cup of the batter per pancake and pour onto the griddle to make sand dollar-sized pancakes. As the pancakes begin to bubble and set on the bottom, flip them. If you're not sure whether they're ready to flip, get under them slightly with your spatula and take a little peek: you want them to fluff up and have a nice golden-brown color. Never push down on the pancakes.

Top each pancake with 2 tablespoons warmed blackberry jam and serve with maple syrup at the table.

Ricotta

MAKES 1 CUPS

Cheesecloth, for straining


  • 1 quart whey (if you don't have whey you can substitute skim milk)
  • 3⁄4 cup whole milk
  • 4 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon heavy cream
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper


Line a fine-mesh sieve with the four to six overlapping layers of cheesecloth and place it over a large pot that will catch the eventual ricotta whey as it strains.
In a heavy-bottomed medium saucepan over medium heat, warm up the whey and milk until the mixture is 198 degrees F and then remove it from the heat.

Add the apple cider vinegar to the milk and slowly stir it to incorporate and then let the curds form, unattended and at room temperature for about 5 minutes.
Strain the curds through the cheesecloth-lined sieve over the large pot for 2 to 3 hours at room temperature.

Open up the cheesecloth and transfer the curds into a medium bowl. Reserve the whey, and use it for our sugo (see page 35, along with the storage note below) if you want. Add the cream and stir lightly making sure not to break up the ricotta too much. Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve, or refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 1 week.

Blackberry jam

MAKES ABOUT 1 QUART

  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter

  • 1 Madagascar vanilla bean, split lengthwise and seeds scraped
  • 2 ½ pounds fresh blackberries
  • 1 ½ cups sugar

  • About ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • Juice of about 1 lemon

In a medium nonreactive pot over medium heat, melt the butter and add the vanilla bean pod and seed. The vanilla will lend a little color to the butter, but you don't want the butter to actually brown from the heat. Cook for about 2 minutes, or until the vanilla bean blooms (you'll smell it).

Add the berries and sugar to the pot and stir. Once they begin to bubble, reduce the heat to medium low. Take your time and simmer gently for 45 to 90 minutes, depending on the water content of the berries. Blackberries contain more water than raspberries, strawberries have more than both, and frozen berries have generally double the water content of their fresh counterpart. You never want the jam to get above a simmer because a boil will start caramelizing the sugars, which changes the flavor.

To test for doneness, smear 1 1⁄2 teaspoons of the jam across a room-temperature plate. Tilt the plate: if the jam runs down the plate, continue to simmer and thicken; if it sticks in place, the jam is done and should be removed from the heat. (Once it cools, the jam will thicken even more.)

Taste the jam. Discard the vanilla bean pod or use it in our Tasty Vanilla Extract (page 98). Stir in additional sugar, salt, and lemon juice incrementally to taste. The more sugar you add to this jam, the more sharp the flavor will be. Adding the smallest amount of salt to it will counteract that sharpness and bring back the rounder, warmer, more berry-forward flavor. The lemon juice gives it a brightness that tends to enhance everything. Some berries have a good amount of natural acidity, such as the raspberry; if making this recipe with raspberries, the lemon juice will most likely be unnecessary.

Use the jam liberally for a couple days, warming it to serve, and freeze the remaining jam in airtight containers or ziplock bags. Always keep in mind that frozen foods expand slightly, so leave a little headspace to allow for that.

*(c)2017 by John Gorham and Liz Crain. All rights reserved. Excerpted from Hello! My Name is Tasty by permission of Sasquatch Books.

 

The publisher is offering three copies of this book to EYB Members in the US. One of the entry options is to answer the following question in the comments section of this blog post.

Which recipe in the index would you try first?

Please note that you must be logged into the Rafflecopter contest before posting or your entry won't be counted. Please be sure to check your spam filters to make sure you receive our email notifications. Prizes can take up to 6 weeks to arrive from the publishers. If you are not already a Member, you can join at no cost. The contest ends at midnight on October 21st, 2017. 

 

Holiday Cookies - Elisabet der Nederlanden - Review, Recipe and Giveaway

Every cookie lover's favorite time of year is rolling up soon and will be here before we know it. I love to bake any time of year but the crisp days of Fall and the late mornings of winter with snow blanketing our backyard are guaranteed baking days in my kitchen. 

Holiday Cookies: Showstopping Recipes to Sweeten the Season by Elisabet der Nederlanden is a beautifully styled book packed with 75 full-color photos and 50 recipes for holiday classics and twists on traditional treats. Along with recipes for Icebox Pinwheel cookies, Hazelnut sandwich cookies and Red and white meringue kisses, the author takes us around the world with Fig and cardamom rugelach, Hungarian kiffles, and more. Candies and confections are covered along with tips for packing, presenting and storing our baked treats. This is a stunning book that would be a great holiday or hostess gift - along with some freshly baked Saffron pistachio biscotti from the book or a cute holiday cookie cutter.

Special thanks to Ten Speed Press and the author for sharing the Glazed eggnog madeleines recipe with our members today. I'm hosting a holiday cookie lunch in November and asking everyone to buy this book and bake a cookie from it to share. I called dibs on these madeleines and hope to make a few others. I'll follow up in November with a post on the experience. It should be fun! Scroll to the end of this post to enter our contest for three copies of Holiday Cookies open to the US from the publisher and Eat Your Books is offering one copy worldwide.  

 

Glazed eggnog madeleines
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Makes 24 madeleines

 

These tender-crumbed cookie-cakes are a classic French treat and perfect alongside a cup of coffee or tea. The flavors of eggnog put this recipe squarely in the holiday realm, making it a great addition to your seasonal cookie assortment. For the best results, chill the batter and freeze the pan. The madeleines are best when eaten the day they are made.

 

MADELEINES

  • 1 1⁄2 cups cake flour
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon baking powder
  • Pinch of ground cloves
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 2 eggs, plus 2 egg yolks
  • 3⁄4 cup granulated sugar
  • 3 tablespoons bourbon or Cognac
  • 3 tablespoons heavy cream
  • 3⁄4 cup (6 ounces) unsalted butter, melted and cooled

Glaze

  • 2⁄3 cup confectioners' sugar
  • 1 tablespoon whole milk
  • Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

12-mold standard-size madeleine pan, 1-tablespoon cookie scoop (optional), wooden skewer or similar tool

To make the madeleines: Sift the flour, baking powder, and cloves into a bowl, then whisk in the salt and nutmeg. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, combine the eggs, yolks, and granulated sugar and whisk on medium-high speed for 5 minutes, until pale and airy. Remove the bowl from the mixer stand, add the flour mixture, and, using a rubber spatula, fold in gently. Add the bourbon, cream, and 1⁄2 cup of the melted butter and continue to fold gently until the ingredients are incorporated. Cover the bowl and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, brush the madeleine molds with 2 tablespoons of the remaining butter, then place the pan in the freezer for 10 minutes.

Position an oven rack in the middle of the oven and preheat the oven to 375°F. Remove the pan from the freezer. Using the scoop or two tablespoons, scoop a rounded tablespoon of batter into each prepared mold. Then, using the wooden skewer, spread the batter gently to evenly

fill the mold. Bake the madeleines for about 12 minutes, until lightly golden brown and a slightly raised bump forms in the center of each one.

Transfer the pan to a wire rack and let cool for 5 minutes. Using a fork, gently loosen each madeleine from its mold, then tip the pan to turn the madeleines onto the rack, scalloped side up, and let cool completely.

Wash and dry the pan, brush the molds with the remaining 2 tablespoons butter, and place the pan in the freezer for 10 minutes. Fill the molds with the remaining batter, then bake and cool the same way.

To make the glaze: In a bowl, whisk together the confectioners' sugar, milk, and nutmeg to the thickness of heavy cream. One by one, dip each madeleine into the glaze at an angle, covering about 1 inch. Place them back on the cooling rack until ready to serve.

The publisher is offering three copies of this book to EYB Members in the US and we are offering one copy worldwide for a total of four. One of the entry options is to answer the following question in the comments section of this blog post.

Which recipe in the index would you try first?

Please note that you must be logged into the Rafflecopter contest before posting or your entry won't be counted. Please be sure to check your spam filters to make sure you receive our email notifications. Prizes can take up to 6 weeks to arrive from the publishers. If you are not already a Member, you can join at no cost. The contest ends at midnight on October 20th, 2017. 

 

Ball Canning Back to Basics

The household name for canning in the US is Ball. At some point in our lives we have all come in contact with the familiar glass jars - either finding them in our grandmother or mother's pantries or having bought them for craft or canning projects ourselves.

Ball Canning Back to Basics: A Foolproof Guide to Canning Jams, Jellies, Pickles, and More by the Ball Test Kitchen was published this July. This full color water bath canning guide shares 100 classic recipes that we should all have in our arsenal. Ball breaks down every step in water bath canning for both the novice canner or for those looking to improve their technique.

Recipes include Nectarine-sour cherry jam, Low sugar honey-pear jam, Meyer lemon marmalade, Blueberry butter and Tomato-apple chutney.  Perfect for Fall and the approaching holidays, the publisher is sharing a recipe for Apple pie jam today. This jam would be great on scones or wrapped with a ribbon as a lovely hostess gift. Time Inc. Books, the publisher, is providing three copies of Back to Basics in our contest open to members in the US - be sure to scroll to the bottom of this post to enter.

Apple pie jam 
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Makes about 5 (1⁄2-pint) jars

This jam plays well with graham crackers or ice cream for a sweet pick-me-up.

  • 6 cups diced peeled Granny Smith apples (about 6 apples)
  • 2 cups apple juice or apple cider
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • ½ cup chopped raisins (optional)
  • 3 tablespoons Ball® Classic Pectin
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 2 cups sugar

1. Bring the apples, juices, and, if desired, raisins to a boil in a 6-quart stainless-steel or enameled Dutch oven; reduce heat, and simmer, uncovered, 10 minutes or until the apples are soft, stirring occasionally.

2. Whisk in the pectin and next 3 ingredients. Bring the mixture to a full rolling boil that cannot be stirred down, over high, stirring constantly.

3. Add the sugar, stirring to dissolve. Return the mixture to a full rolling boil. Boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim the foam, if necessary.

4. Ladle the hot jam into a hot jar, leaving 1⁄4-inch headspace. Wipe the jar rim. Center the lid on the jar. Apply the band, and adjust to fingertip-tight. Place the jar in the boiling water canner. Repeat until all the jars are filled.

5. Process the jars 10 minutes, adjusting for altitude. Turn off heat; remove the lid, and let the jars stand 5 minutes. Remove the jars and cool.

Excerpted from Ball® Canning Back to Basics. Copyright © 2017 Hearthmark, LLC. Reprinted with permission from Time Inc. Books, a division of Time Inc. New York, NY. All rights reserved.

The publisher is offering three copies of this titles to EYB Members in the US. One of the entry options is to answer the following question in the comments section of this blog post.

Which recipe in the index would you try first?

Please note that you must be logged into the Rafflecopter contest before posting or your entry won't be counted. Please be sure to check your spam filters to make sure you receive our email notifications. Prizes can take up to 6 weeks to arrive from the publishers. If you are not already a Member, you can join at no cost. The contest ends at midnight on October 20th, 2017. 

 

Fruit and Corn - Savor the South Cookbooks

Savor the South® is a collection of little cookbooks that celebrate the food and tradition of the American South. They are written by well-known cooks and food lovers - full of personality with fifty recipes each. I only have three of these amazing books - but I want them all. Today, we are featuring two of the latest.

First up we have, Fruit: A Savor the South® Cookbook by Nancie McDermott which features recipes for blackberries, cantaloupe, damson plums, figs, mayhaws, muscadine and scuppernong grapes, pawpaws, peaches, persimmons, quince, strawberries, and watermelon. Nancie also shares tips on how to sterilize jars, storing jams, making the perfect pie crust, how to prepare pawpaws for eating, cooking and storing and how to peel and prepare other fruits. 

Nancie, not only is an incredible friend, but a knowledgeable food expert in both Southern and Asian cuisine. Many of her books sit proudly on my shelves and her recipes always work. The publisher is sharing a recipe with our members today for Fresh peach chutney (I need to grab some peaches and make this soon) as well as providing three copies of this book (and Corn) in our giveaway - scroll to the bottom of this post to enter.

 

Fresh peach chutney

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I love the sunny color and piquant flavors of this British-style chutney. It pairs wonderfully with roast chicken, spicy shrimp curry, rice pilaf, or anything sizzling-hot off the grill.

Makes 3 cups

  • 3 cups coarsely chopped ripe peaches
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped apple
  • 1 cup finely chopped onion
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped bell pepper, any color
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1/4 cup chopped candied ginger (optional)
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar or white vinegar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons mustard seeds
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

In a 3-quart saucepan or Dutch oven, combine the peaches, apples, onions, and bell peppers. Stir with a large spoon to mix them well. Add the raisins, candied ginger, if using, sugar, vinegar, mustard seeds, red pepper flakes, and salt and stir well. Bring to a lively boil over medium-high heat. Stir to coat all the ingredients evenly.

Adjust the heat to maintain a gentle but active simmer. Cook, stirring now and then, until the chutney has thickened a little, formed a pleasing syrup, and developed its flavor, 30-40 minutes. Remove from the heat and let cool to room temperature. Serve at room temperature. Cover and store in the refrigerator for up to 2-3 weeks.

From FRUIT: A SAVOR THE SOUTH® COOKBOOK. Copyright © 2017 by the University of North Carolina Press. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu

 

*******************************************************************************

 

Next up is Corn: A Savor the South® Cookbook by Tema Flanagan that shares recipes for on- and off- the cob dishes, dried and ground, nixtamalized and popped, mashed and fermented along with plenty of tips and facts - from polenta versus grits, Southern cornbread in black and white, canned versus dried hominy, brown-bag microwave popcorn and pitting cherries (cherries are needed in one recipe). 

Special thanks again to the publisher for sharing this tasty recipe with our members. I want this right now! Be sure to scroll to the bottom of this post to enter our contest to win a set of these great books. 

Molasses caramel corn with candied bacon, peanuts, and sesame

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With candied bacon bits, roasted peanuts, and crunchy sesame seeds, this sweet-and-salty molasses caramel corn may be the most addictive thing that's ever come out of my kitchen. The recipe makes a large quantity, but trust me when I say that you won't have any problems "getting rid" of it. Moreover, it makes for a great holiday gift when packaged in little baggies and tied with a bit of twine.

Makes 5 1/2 quarts

For the candied bacon

  • 1/4 cup light brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2/3 pound thick-cut bacon (about 7 strips, uncooked)

For the caramel corn

  • 12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter
  • 2 cups light brown sugar
  • 2/3 cup molasses
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2/3 cup roasted peanuts
  • 1/3 cup sesame seeds
  • 5 quarts freshly popped Buttery Stovetop Popcorn (butter and salt omitted)

To make the candied bacon, preheat the oven to 350º. Line a baking sheet with two layers of aluminum foil, wrapping the foil around the edges of the pan. Fit a metal cooling rack over the baking sheet and set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk together the brown sugar, maple syrup, salt, black pepper, and cayenne pepper. Put the uncooked bacon strips in the brown sugar mixture and toss to coat the strips evenly. Place the strips in a single layer on the metal rack and bake until the bacon is a deep reddish-brown and crispy looking, about 30 minutes. Remove the bacon from the oven and let it cool for 5 minutes before transferring to a sheet of parchment paper to fully cool.

To make the caramel corn, preheat the oven to 250°. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add the brown sugar, molasses, salt, and vanilla and stir to mix. Bring the mixture to a boil and cook, stirring constantly, until the sugar melts, 3-5 minutes.

Remove the butter mixture from the heat and immediately stir in the baking soda (be careful, as the mixture may bubble up or foam when you add the soda). Stir in the candied bacon, roasted peanuts, and sesame seeds and stir to evenly mix.

Place the popcorn in a large mixing bowl. Pour the caramel mixture over the popcorn and stir and toss to coat the popcorn and evenly distribute the bacon, peanuts, and sesame seeds. Spread the caramel corn mixture evenly over the two prepared baking sheets.

Bake for 1 hour, stirring every 20 minutes to prevent burning and to coat evenly. Remove the caramel corn from the oven and let it cool completely before breaking up any large chunks and storing in an airtight container.

From CORN: A SAVOR THE SOUTH® COOKBOOK. Copyright © 2017 by the University of North Carolina Press. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu

 

The publisher is offering three sets of these titles to EYB Members in the US. One of the entry options is to answer the following question in the comments section of this blog post.

Which book are you most excited about?

Please note that you must be logged into the Rafflecopter contest before posting or your entry won't be counted. Please be sure to check your spam filters to make sure you receive our email notifications. Prizes can take up to 6 weeks to arrive from the publishers. If you are not already a Member, you can join at no cost. The contest ends at midnight on October 18th, 2017. 

 

Toronto Eats - Review, Recipe and Giveaway

Toronto Eats: 100 Signature Recipes from the City's Best Restaurants by Amy Rosen is the latest addition to the Figure1 series that shares restaurant and chef profiles along with a recipe or two from their respective menus. The Cooks and Eats series have become some of my all time favorite cookbooks. With one book, I have access to Canada's best restaurants, get to know their brightest chefs and experience dishes all from the comfort of my own kitchen.

Ottawa CooksEdmonton CooksMontreal CooksWinnipeg CooksCalgary CooksToronto Cooks  and Portland Cooks (they have entered the US and I will have a promotion on this new title soon) are all incredibly well done books with unique recipes and gorgeous photographs.

Toronto Eats takes up where Toronto Cooks left off. This second helping shares more than 100 recipes from 50 amazing chefs including several that were featured in the first book. What I love most about this series is the broad and diverse range of approachable dishes - from Vietnamese-Style Pork and Crab Spring Rolls to Zucchini Manicotti with Cashew-Dill Ricotta. Starters, soups, salads, mains, sides and desserts are covered from talented chefs across the city - there truly is something for everyone.

Special thanks to Figure1 for providing us with two copies of this title for our US and Canadian members and for sharing these incredible looking brownies. Be sure to scroll down to the bottom of this post to enter our contest.

 

Sierra's Insanely Awesome Brownies
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Makes 24 brownies

1 lb dark chocolate (use 70%  for an intense chocolate hit)
2 cups unsalted butter
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/4 cup cocoa powder, sifted
1 cup high-quality organic  pastry flour, sifted
5 eggs
3 cups granulated sugar
Flaked sea salt or kosher salt
Coarsely ground coffee beans

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Spray a 9 x 13-inch rectangular pan with non-stick spray and line with parchment paper. In a double boiler, or a bowl set over simmering water, melt chocolate, butter, and salt and mix with a wooden spoon until well mixed. Set aside to cool.

In a medium bowl, combine cocoa and flour.  In a second medium bowl, whisk together eggs and sugar until pale and fluffy. Fold chocolate mixture into egg mixture until combined, then fold in flour mixture. Pour batter into the pan and spread out with a spatula.

The publisher is offering two copies of this title to EYB Members in the US and Canada. One of the entry options is to answer the following question in the comments section of this blog post.

Which recipe in the index  are you excited to try first?

Please note that you must be logged into the Rafflecopter contest before posting or your entry won't be counted. Please be sure to check your spam filters to make sure you receive our email notifications. Prizes can take up to 6 weeks to arrive from the publishers. If you are not already a Member, you can join at no cost. The contest ends at midnight on October 17th, 2017. 

 

Bravetart - Review, recipe and giveaway

Stella Parks, pastry genius at Serious Eats, delivers a book that has eliminated all the guess work from the baking equation. Honestly, if you can't bake after reading and following the advice and recipes in BraveTart: Iconic American Desserts - you might want to hang up your apron and retire your flour sifter. 

These are not just basic recipes - these are the basic recipes that will be your go-tos from here forward - carefully tested, all scenarios played out and planned for, variations to give a twist to the recipes and more - much, much more. This is one of the titles I had been waiting for (read stalking) Stella about for years. BraveTart will surely be shining at the cookbook awards this year - Stella's baking book is the equivalent of Kenji's The Food Lab - both books must be in your collection.

Little touches throughout the book make it spectacular - cutting out pineapple stars for the Upside Down Pineapple Cake, Homemade Sprinkles - chocolate and rainbow, Five Minute Muffins using Stella's Top Shelf Muffin Mix, recipes for all our childhood favorites - Thin Mints, Twinkies, Heath Bars - you name it, Stella has re-invented it for us.

BraveTart goes the extra mile in this complete textbook to American classic desserts, for instance:

  • setting forth precautions
  • thinking ahead as to what mistakes one might make - i.e. is it safe to add an extract to an angel food cake recipe (see recipe below)
  • what to look for in batter consistency, beating egg whites, etc.
  • what to avoid
  • what setting the mixer should be on and for how long
  • why we need to weigh everything 
  • instructing what temperature butter should be for a particular recipe
  • should eggs be room temperature or cold 
  • providing step-by-step game plans for celebration planning, decorating cakes and more 

The only thing that would be better than owning this book - is having Stella in your kitchen actually making the recipes for you with Idris Elba pouring you a glass of ice cold milk. The mix it up! section of each recipe provides a wealth of options to alter the recipe and experience new flavors and textures including gluten-free options. The woman has thought of it all.

The butter is currently coming to 65 degrees on my counter so that I can make the Chopped Chocolate Chip Cookies (recipe one) and I'll upload my photo  later. I've made many a Stella Parks' recipe and they are all golden - she even has me foregoing my beautiful Emile Henry pie plates for grandma's plain glass pie plates that I donated years ago and had to rebuy - just doing my part for the economy - one pie plate at a time.

Special thanks to W.W. Norton for sharing this heavenly (I couldn't help myself) Angel Food Cake with variations to boot. Scroll below to enter our giveaway for two copies of this book. Stella's packed book tour is available on our calendar - be sure to check if she is in your area.



Effortless Angel's Food Cake

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This is probably the easiest meringue you'll ever make. Just put some cold egg whites and sugar in a bowl, start whipping, and then stop before they're stiff. With a squeeze of lemon for stability, this seemingly underwhipped meringue puffs the angel's food until it's as light as cotton candy. The lemon disappears in the oven, leaving behind a soft, tender vanilla cake.

Aside from my unusual treatment of the meringue, the success of this angel's food hinges on bleached cake flour. It has a super-low protein content that can't be faked with cornstarch or replaced by pastry flour. Look for brands like Swans Down or Softasilk in the baking aisle, and avoid anything marked self-rising or unbleached.

Because this recipe may present a couple of new techniques for the uninitiated, give yourself room to learn. Like a kiss, angel's food only gets better with experience. That's not to say your first time won't be deliciously sweet, only that half the fun is in perfecting your technique.

Yield: one 10-inch cake; 10 to 12 servings | Active time: 30 minutes | Downtime: 2 hours to cool

  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons | 5 ounces bleached cake flour, such as Swans Down
  • 2 cups | 15 ounces egg whites (from a dozen large eggs), straight from the fridge
  • 2 cups | 15 ounces sugar
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons | 1 ounce freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon Diamond Crystal kosher salt (half as much if iodized)

Key Point: The unique behavior of bleached cake flour is vital to this recipe's success; unbleached cake flour will cause the angel's food cake to collapse.

Get ready:

Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat to 350°F. Have ready an aluminum tube pan with a removable bottom, roughly 10 inches across and 4 inches deep. Nonstick pans will not work. If the pan doesn't have stilts, set out a bottle with a slender neck that will fit into the mouth of  the tube.

Sift flour (if using a cup measure, spoon into the cup and level with a knife before sifting).

Make the cake:

Combine egg whites, sugar, and vanilla in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Mix on low speed to moisten, about 1 minute, then increase to medium-low (4 on a KitchenAid) and whip for 3 minutes; the whites will look very dense, and dark from the vanilla. Add the lemon juice and salt, increase speed to medium (6 on a KitchenAid), and whip for 3 minutes; the meringue will be light but thin, not foamy. Increase to medium-high (8 on a KitchenAid), and continue whipping until the wires leave a distinct vortex pattern in the thick, glossy meringue, another 3 minutes or so, depending on the freshness of the whites. To check the meringue, detach the whisk; when whipped to very soft peaks, the meringue will run off the wires but retain enough body to pile up on itself in a soft mound.

Sprinkle cake flour over the meringue and stir gently with a flexible spatula to disperse. Switch to a folding motion and work from the bottom up, cutting through the middle, until no pockets of flour remain. Pour the batter into the pan; if you notice a small patch of unmixed flour as you pour, incorporate it into the surrounding batter with a gentle wiggle of your spatula. The pan should be about two-thirds full.

Bake until the cake has risen well above the rim of the pan, with a firm, golden blonde crust, about 45 minutes (206°F). Immediately invert the pan on its stilts, or over the neck of the bottle, and cool upside down until no trace of warmth remains, at least 2 hours.

Serve:

Turn the cooled cake right side up and loosen the outer edges with a metal spatula. Lift the center tube to remove the cake, then loosen it from the bottom too. Invert onto a serving plate; the cake will slide right off the tube. With a chef's knife or serrated bread knife, cut into 10 or 12 servings with a gentle sawing motion, applying very little downward pressure. Angel's food is mostly air, so the big slices will be less filling than they look.

Wrapped tightly in plastic, leftovers will keep for up to a week at room temperature. You can also drop thin slices of angel's food into a toaster to crisp like a campfire marshmallow.

Troubleshooting

If a speck of yolk slips into the whites, fish it out with an eggshell. If the yolk can't be removed, save those whites for Tahitian Vanilla Pudding (page 225) or White Mountain Layer Cake (page 110) and start fresh.

Extracts like peppermint and orange, made from essential oils, may cause the meringue to collapse; take care when experimenting with flavorings.

In a kitchen below 68°F, cold air may cause the cake to contract and fall from the pan before its crumb has set. As a workaround, open the oven door and place the inverted cake on the stovetop, where drafts of warm air will stabilize its temperature.

Through trial and error, I've discovered that the highly polished sides of stainless steel angel's food cake pans may cause the cake to fall from the pan as it cools. For best results, use an untreated aluminum tube pan.

Mix it up! 

Brown Sugar Cinnamon: A cozy flavor for fall, or to end a heavy holiday meal. Sift the cake flour with 4 teaspoons ground cinnamon, and replace the sugar with an equal amount of light brown sugar (dark will not work as well).

Chocolate: However angelic its texture, this variation turns out as dark as devil's food. Reduce the cake flour to 3 ounces (2/3 cup), sifted with 2 ounces (2/3 cup) Dutch-process cocoa powder, such as Cacao Barry Extra Brute. After cooling the cake, use a slender knife or bamboo skewer to loosen it from the center tube too, as this version tends to stick.

Creamsicle: Pulse the cake flour with 2 tablespoons orange zest in a food processor for 1 minute. Replace the vanilla extract with 2 teaspoons orange flower water and the seeds from 1 Tahitian vanilla bean (split and scraped). Trade the lemon juice for 11/2 ounces (3 tablespoons) freshly squeezed orange juice.

Green Tea: The sweetness of angel's food mellows the bitterness of Japanese matcha, for a mossy-green cake with an earthy but aromatic flavor. Sift the cake flour with 2 tablespoons matcha (see page 22). I love to serve slices alongside Whipped Chocolate Crémeux (page 263) with a scattering of Cocoa Nib Crunch (page 321).

Lemonade: Grinding lemon zest into the flour helps release its essential oil, making this variation particularly aromatic. Pulse the cake flour with 2 tablespoons lemon zest in a food processor for about 1 minute. Omit the vanilla extract and salt. Increase the lemon juice to 11/2 ounces (3 tablespoons). Also lovely with lime juice and zest instead.

Roasted Sugar and Vanilla Bean: This is, without a doubt, my favorite way to make Angel's Food. It's not my "basic" recipe, because the process of roasting sugar is time-consuming, and not everyone keeps a vanilla bean on hand, but these two upgrades make the cake even more extraordinary. Replace the sugar with 15 ounces (2 cups) Roasted Sugar (page 102). Along with the vanilla extract, use the seeds from 1 Mexican vanilla bean, split and  scraped.

Gluten-Free: Sift 2 ounces (1/2 cup) arrowroot, 11/2 ounces (1/3 cup) white rice flour, 11/2 ounces (1/3 cup) cornstarch, 1 ounce (1/4 cup) coconut flour, and 1 teaspoon baking powder into a medium bowl, then whisk to combine.

 

The publisher is offering two copies of this title to EYB Members in the US. One of the entry options is to answer the following question in the comments section of this blog post.

Which recipe in the index are you excited to try first?

Please note that you must be logged into the Rafflecopter contest before posting or your entry won't be counted. Please be sure to check your spam filters to make sure you receive our email notifications. Prizes can take up to 6 weeks to arrive from the publishers. If you are not already a Member, you can join at no cost. The contest ends at midnight on October 16th, 2017. 

 

Erin Bakes Cake - Review, recipe and giveaway

Erin Bakes Cake: Make + Bake + Decorate = Your Own Cake Adventure! by Erin Gardner is what happens when the game Twister (rainbow unicorn edition) and pure cake innovation come together. It is a brilliantly done collection of cakey components to mix and match to create stunning, must-make and must-eat cake.

Base cake recipes with multiple variations, crunchy, nutty add-ins for fillings, buttercreams, jams and more allow you to raise your cake flag high. For instance, the Sweet Bouquet Cake combines - Ginger Birthday Cake, Pineapple Lime Jam, Candied Macadamia Nut Crunch and Raspberry Buttercream to make a cake that would rival any bakery's version and worthy of any celebration.

Erin provides countless decorating tips and tricks, substitution guides, remixes (not box mixes) but ideas to turn your tall layer cake into a sheet cake, single layer or cupcakes. Her book is a explosive array of color and cake ingenuity meant to transform us into cake bosses. Note, throughout Erin does give instructions if using a box mix as well as tips for making that box mix taste more like homemade - but people - it's cake - it's special -  make it taste like homemade because it is - homemade. Seriously, do what you need to do that works for you - but don't be afraid of baking from scratch - there is a world of difference in taste.

I used the Chocolate Cake we are sharing here today for a birthday cake and it was perfect. Erin's Peanut Butter Cake and Vanilla Buttercream used in her Three-Ring Circus Cake - is next on my list. Erin Bakes is my new go-to for fun, delicious and anything but boring cake. I'm going to suggest that we bake from Erin's book in The Cookbook Junkies Cookbook Club soon.

Special thanks to Rodale and the author for sharing a recipe from this technicolor dream (I am resisting the urge to type "crumbcoat") of a book. Rodale is offering three copies of this book in our contest below - scroll down and enter.

Chocolate Birthday Cake

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doctor, doctor! The boxed equivalent to this recipe would be a devil's food or dark chocolate cake mix. For a denser cake that more closely resembles homemade, add 1 large egg yolk and one 3.5-ounce box of instant chocolate pudding mix to the ingredients called for on the box.

 

Yields:
10 cups batter
Two tall 8-inch round cakes
Three regular 6-inch round cakes

8 ounces unsalted butter, softened
2 ½ cups packed dark brown sugar
1 ½ cups granulated sugar
2 teaspoons baking soda
2 teaspoons kosher salt
8 large eggs
1 ½ cups Dutch-processed cocoa powder
2 cups warm water
1 cup whole milk
4 cups all-purpose flour (plus more for the pans)

Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 350°F. Spray and flour pans in your chosen size.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or in a large bowl using an electric hand mixer), beat together the butter, brown sugar, granulated sugar, baking soda, and salt at medium speed until fluffy and lighter in color, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula to make sure there are no butter lumps, about 5 minutes.

Add the eggs, one at a time, until completely combined. Stop and scrape down the sides of the bowl halfway through mixing and after adding the last egg.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the cocoa powder and warm water until combined. Once the cocoa powder has dissolved, add the milk and whisk to combine.

With the mixer on low, add half of the flour to the butter mixture until just incorporated. Slowly add half of the milk mixture until combined. Stop and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Add the remaining flour and mix until just incorporated. Add the last of the wet ingredients and mix until combined.

Divide the batter evenly between the prepared pans and bake, rotating the pans' positions halfway through baking, until a toothpick inserted in the center of a cake comes out clean or with a few crumbs clinging to it, 45 to 50 minutes for 8-inch round pans or 30 to 35 minutes for 6-inch round pans.

 

The publisher is offering three copies of this title to EYB Members in the US. One of the entry options is to answer the following question in the comments section of this blog post.

Which recipe in the index are you excited to try first?

Please note that you must be logged into the Rafflecopter contest before posting or your entry won't be counted. Please be sure to check your spam filters to make sure you receive our email notifications. Prizes can take up to 6 weeks to arrive from the publishers. If you are not already a Member, you can join at no cost. The contest ends at midnight on October 15th, 2017. 

 

The Blossom Cookbook - Promotion

Ronen Seri and Pamela Elizabeth, the co-founders of the Blossom restaurants in Manhattan, share their favorite recipes in their debut cookbook, The Blossom Cookbook: Classic Favorites from the Restaurant that Pioneered a New Vegan Cuisine. Over eighty recipes from a Tofu Scramble that can be whipped up in minutes or an impressive Autumn Tower which layers tempeh, roasted vegetables, chickpea cakes with a simple tomato sauce that will take some time commitment but will impress all around your table. The dishes here are sure to ignite a spark of fresh culinary passion for vegan cooks with recipes from sauces and condiments and meals from breakfast to dinner. For non vegans, this will be the book to turn to for guests who have adopted the vegan lifestyle. Even the desserts look as if they were photographed behind the glass case of a patisserie.

Special thanks to Avery for sharing a recipe with our members today and for sponsoring three books in our contest open to Eat Your Book members in the US. Scroll down to enter and don't forget you can add this recipe to your bookshelf by following the instructions below. 

Cauliflower Risotto
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I am especially proud of this dish because it is so inventive; a vegetable-based spin on a traditional risotto. We replaced the rice with cauliflower, which is an incredibly versatile vegetable. To add a meaty kick, we added shiitakes to this dish to balance the milder taste of the cauliflower. It's incredible how many other restaurants and chefs are now using cauliflower as a meat or grain replacement!

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 5 tablespoons vegan butter
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic, plus 1 garlic clove
  • 1 teaspoon salt, plus more as needed
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper, plus more as needed
  • 1¼ cups polenta
  • 1 medium head cauliflower
  • 2 whole shallots plus 2 tablespoons chopped shallot
  • 5 tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ cup white wine
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 cups sliced shiitake mushrooms

In a large pot, combine 1 tablespoon of the vegan butter, the minced garlic, 1 teaspoon of the salt, ½ teaspoon of the pepper, and 3 cups water. Bring to a boil. Add the polenta and stir until the water has been absorbed, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from the pan and spread the polenta over a baking sheet; let cool in the refrigerator.

Remove the cauliflower stem, coarsely chop it, and place it in a food processor. Pulse seven or eight times, or until it is finely minced, similar to the size and consistency of grains of rice. Divide the cauliflower into two equal portions.

Fill a large pot with water and add half the cauliflower, the whole shallots, and the garlic clove. Bring to a boil, and boil for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the cauliflower is soft. Drain the water and transfer the boiled cauliflower, shallots, and garlic to high-speed blender. Blend until smooth.

In a large sauté pan, heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the chopped shallot and sauté for 1 to 2 minutes, then add the rest of the minced cauliflower and stir well. Add the white wine and sauté for 1 to 2 minutes, then add the pureed cauliflower and stir. Add 1 cup water, ½ teaspoon salt, and 2 tablespoons of the vegan butter and stir. Add the parsley and stir to combine.

In a medium skillet, heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and a pinch each of salt and pepper. Sauté until the mushrooms begin to brown. Set aside.

Remove the polenta from the refrigerator and use a large thin-rimmed glass or a cookie cutter to cut it into rounds.

In a separate medium sauté pan, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat. Add the polenta cakes and sauté for 1 to 2 minutes on each side, or until golden brown on both sides.

To assemble, divide the polenta cakes between two plates, then top with the cauliflower risotto and finally the sautéed mushrooms.

Reprinted from THE BLOSSOM COOKBOOK by arrangement with Avery Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company. Copyright © 2017, Ronen Seri and Pamela Elizabeth Photo: Alex Etling

 

 

The publisher is offering three copies of this title to EYB Members in the US. One of the entry options is to answer the following question in the comments section of this blog post.

Which recipe in the index are you excited to try first?

Please note that you must be logged into the Rafflecopter contest before posting or your entry won't be counted. Please be sure to check your spam filters to make sure you receive our email notifications. Prizes can take up to 6 weeks to arrive from the publishers. If you are not already a Member, you can join at no cost. The contest ends at midnight on October 15th, 2017. 

 

Classic Koffmann - Review, recipe and giveaway

Classic Koffmann: 50 Years a Chef captures the passion of Pierre Koffmann who has dedicated five decades to his love of French cuisine.

Gorgeous photos radiate off the pages, testimonials from fellow chefs, as well as conversations with him - all make for one stellar cookbook. The pièce de résistance, for me, is the red satin place marker with a darling cardboard pig lassoed to the end which somehow transforms this serious cookbook into something more approachable and playful.

The recipes run the gamut from a simply elegant, lentils, foie gras and crispy duck skin with a few ingredients and steps to a project dish of snail ravioli with garlic butter sauce that sounds easy but has a laundry list of ingredients and multiple components. Every aspect of French cuisine is covered in this book that so brilliantly reflects Chef Koffmann's life and his love of being a chef.

Special thanks to Jacqui Small Publishers for sharing the following recipe with our members and for providing three copies of this title to our members in the US, UK and Canada. Please be sure to scroll down to the bottom of this post for contest information.

 

 

Daurade, légumes d'automne rôties
Black bream and roasted autumn vegetables

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Bream is a generic name for a range of fish, including black, red and white bream, porgies in the USA, and the Mediterranean daurade royale (gilt head bream), which is widely acknowledged to be the best and is definitely my favourite. The black bream I've used here is the next best, and more often my choice because not only is it always wild (I only ever cook wild fish), but it is inexpensive and the flesh is juicy but firm and full of flavour. It's not quite as sweet as gilt head bream but still delicious and a perfect match for the earthy autumn root vegetables I've served it with here.

Serves 4

  • 210g (7½oz/1 scant cup) unsalted butter
  • 200g (7oz/1 cup) butternut squash, cut into 1cm (½in) dice
  • 200g (7oz/1 cup) Jerusalem artichokes, cut into 1cm (½in) dice
  • 200g (7oz/3 sticks) salsify (oyster plant)
  • juice of ½ lemon
  • 4 x 200g (7oz) black bream or sea bream fillets, scaled (you can ask your fishmonger to do this for you)
  • 100g (3½oz/²/3 cup) plain (all-purpose) flour
  • 100ml (3½fl oz/¹/3 cup) olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  • beurre blanc (see page 276),
  • to serve finely chopped chives, to garnish

Divide the butter into three. Add the first third to a small saucepan, along with a splash of water. Add the squash and cook it in the butter slowly, over a low-medium heat, until soft and golden, then remove from the pan, transfer to a serving dish and set aside in a low oven to keep warm. Add another third of the butter to the pan and cook the Jerusalem artichokes in the same way, then add them to the dish of squash.

Peel the salsify (oyster plant) and immediately place in a pan of cold water with the lemon juice. Bring to the boil and simmer until tender - about 10 minutes, depending on their size. Drain and cut into batons.

Add the final third of the butter to the saucepan and pan-fry the salsify (oyster plant) until golden, then add them to the other vegetables. Set aside, covered, over a low heat while you cook the bream.

Roll the fish in the flour until covered, then shake or tap it firmly to remove the excess.

Season the fish on both sides. In a large frying pan (skillet), heat the oil over a medium heat. Add the bream, skin-side down, and fry for about 4 minutes, then flip them over and cook for a further 2 minutes, until tender and with a lovely golden colour.

Serve the fish on a bed of the vegetables with the beurre blanc poured over and sprinkled with the chives.

Beurre blanc

Makes about 1.25 litres (2 pints/1¾ quarts)

  • 50g (1¾oz/3 tbsp) shallots, finely chopped
  • 300ml (10fl oz/1¼ cups) white wine vinegar
  • 50ml (3 tbsp) dry white wine
  • 150g (5½oz/²/3 cup) cold unsalted butter, cut into cubes

Place the shallot, vinegar and wine in a small saucepan over a medium heat. Bring to the boil and bubble until almost no liquid remains. Pour in 200ml (7fl oz/1 scant cup) of cold water and bring back to the boil, then turn the heat down to a gentle simmer and slowly add the butter, a cube at a time, whisking and incorporating each addition before adding more, to give the sauce a lovely creamy texture. Set aside in a warm place until needed.

 

The publisher is offering three copies of this title to EYB Members in the US, UK and Canada. One of the entry options is to answer the following question in the comments section of this blog post.

Which recipe in the index are you excited to try first?

Please note that you must be logged into the Rafflecopter contest before posting or your entry won't be counted. Please be sure to check your spam filters to make sure you receive our email notifications. Prizes can take up to 6 weeks to arrive from the publishers. If you are not already a Member, you can join at no cost. The contest ends at midnight on October 14th, 2017. 

 

Le Gavroche - Review, recipe and worldwide giveaway

Le Gavroche Cookbook by Michel Roux Jr is a slice of culinary history packed into a cookbook. Leading London restaurant, Le Gavroche, created and run by the Roux family, is now in its 50th year. When the restaurant opened its doors in 1967 with Albert and Michel Roux at the helm, it was the only one of its kind in London.

Half a century later, the Roux family is a name synonymous with quality French cooking and the highest standard of service. Even mother and daughter team Giselle and Emily have a book coming soon New French Table: A Fresh Take on Classic Recipes. 

Michel Roux Jr. has been chef de cuisine at Le Gavroche for over 25 years now. In this book, he selects 200 of the most popular classic recipes from its kitchens. Roux Jr. worked with many of France's top chefs and as a personal chef to the President of France before taking over at Le Gavroche. This edition of his first book marks the restaurant's 50th year anniversary, showing how to create the atmosphere and cuisine of Le Gavroche at home, with advice on dining French style and how to select what to drink, from aperitif to sweet wine.

From the more sophisticated Stuffed Saddle of Lamb with Spinach and Garlic, Saffron Jus to Waffles with Poached Pear, Bitter Chocolate Sauce and Poire Williams Cold Sabayon to a one pot, but still elegant, Coq à la bière and Hot Cherries with Chocolate Brownie and Pistachio Ice Cream there is a full range of French dishes to whet your appetite and stretch your culinary muscles.

Special thanks to Orion for sharing this luscious dessert below with us and for offering three copies of this title in our worldwide giveaway - scroll down for giveaway information. 

 

Vanilla crème brulée with almond puff pastry sticks
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You can use any ramekin dishes for this, but I like to use large shallow ones, for a higher proportion of crunchy brûlée to rich cream. Demerara sugar gives a crunchier topping, but does not stay that way for long.

Serves 4

  • 250ml double cream
  • 75ml full fat milk
  • 1 vanilla pod, scraped
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 50g caster sugar, plus 3-4 tablespoons for the topping
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla essence

 Heat the oven to 140°C/275°F/gas 1. Put the cream, milk and vanilla pod into a saucepan and heat to boiling point. Cover and leave to infuse for 10 minutes.

Whisk the yolks and 50g of the sugar together until pale and thick, add the vanilla essence and pour the boiling cream on to the mixture; stir well, then pour into four ramekins.

Cook in a water bath in the oven until just set, about 20 minutes. Leave to cool.

Sprinkle with a thin, even layer of sugar and caramelize with a blow-torch or under a very hot grill. Repeat several times until you have the desired degree of golden brown crackling toppin. Leave to cool; serve within 2 hours.

Sacristains

Heat the oven to 190°C/375°F/gas 5. Roll out a sheet of puff pastry to 3mm thickness, brush with beaten egg and sprinkle with finely chopped almonds. Using a long sharp knife, cut strips of pastry 12mm wide and 10cm long.Twist five times and place on a baking sheet. Cook until golden and crisp, dust with icing sugar and serve warm with the crème brulée.

 

The publisher is offering three copies of this title to EYB Members worlwide. One of the entry options is to answer the following question in the comments section of this blog post.

Which recipe in the index are you excited to try first?

Please note that you must be logged into the Rafflecopter contest before posting or your entry won't be counted. Please be sure to check your spam filters to make sure you receive our email notifications. Prizes can take up to 6 weeks to arrive from the publishers. If you are not already a Member, you can join at no cost. The contest ends at midnight on October 12th, 2017. 

 

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