Who gets to tell the story?

Longthroat MemoirsI've written many times about virtually traveling by means of cookbooks and food. If one cannot visit a land, what better way to get a taste of it than to, well, get a taste of it. While I still believe in this concept, I've come to think that some of the cookbooks that celebrate a culture don't adequately translate the flavors or feelings of the particular area. The flaw is not lack of earnestness or good intentions, but rather of relationship to the subject matter. 

This struck home after reading an article that delved into Anthony Bourdain's "Parts Unknown" episode about Lagos, Nigeria. Written by Tunde Wey, a Lagos-born chef and writer, the piece succinctly explained the pitfalls of explaining a region and its cuisine through the eyes of someone with no experience in the culture. 

Wey posits that although Bourdain holds himself out to be a cultural relativist - offering no judgment save for what is delicious or not - he instead interjects his own bias throughout the program, whether intentional or not. After watching the Lago episode, Wey found that Bourdain's "tired and standard offer of a countercultural perspective, was cloying, and it dissolved - like sugar in garri - to reveal the expansive firmament of White Americanness he represents."

Rather than showing the viewers a faithful portrait of the city, Wey feels that the episode instead provides us with a glimpse into Bourdain's own mind. Rather than acting as a translator, Wey contends, Bourdain plays to what his fans want to see. "Mr. Bourdain's real talent, captured in these sharply edited visuals, is the faithful reproduction of any representation of otherness that permits its consumption," says Wey. "At this work, he is a master, breaking sweet people down from complex to simple sugars, all the more digestible, all the more delicious. This is the modern conqueror."

To find a better representation of Lagos, Nigeria or Africa in general, contends Wey, we should turn to  Longthroat Memoirs: Soups, Sex and Nigerian Taste Buds  by Yemisi Aribisala. The storyteller is as important as the story, and the description of any culture is likely to be more compelling when told by someone who has lived inside of it. 

Recipes from The Palestinian Table

Phaidon creates books that ushers  readers around the globe through stunning photographs, beautiful stories and recipes. We are able to experience myriad cultures and traditions through their pages bringing us all just a little bit closer. 

One such title is Reem Kassis' James Beard nominated, The Palestinian Table. Here Reem weaves together personal anecdotes, traditions and history so that we may experience her Palestine. With delicious, easy-to-follow recipes that range from simple breakfasts and speedy salads to celebratory dishes fit for a feast, she gives a rare insight into the heart and hearth of the Palestinian family kitchen. The dishes are accompanied by full page photographs as well as a sprinkling of images of the people and marketplaces of this area.

Today we have three recipes from The Palestinian Table for you to try courtesy of Phaidon. Add them to your bookshelf to try soon.

Please remember that members of Eat Your Books receive a 30% discount when ordering Phaidon titles using this link.

Za'atar filled flatbreads
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Preparation Time: 40 minutes + resting time
Cooking Time: 7-12 minutes
Makes 10

One of the oldest and most traditional Palestinian pastries, these flatbreads, as well as being delicious, have an emotional significance for my family. My mother's uncle, Yousef, was forced into political exile at twenty. The next time he saw anyone from his family was two decades later when my mother traveled to the United States. He had one request - to bring him some of his mother's akras za'atar.


For the pastry

• 4 ½ cups (1 lb 2 oz/500 g) all-purpose (plain) flour, plus extra for dusting
• 2 ¼ cups (9 oz/250 g) fine whole wheat (wholemeal) flour
• 2 teaspoons salt
• 1 teaspoon sugar
• 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus extra for oiling
• 1 tablespoon active dry (fast-action) yeast
• 2-2 ½ cups (18-20 fl oz/500-600 ml) warm water
For the filling
• 2 cups (3 ½ oz/100 g) firmly packed fresh za'atar leaves (or substitute with fresh oregano and/or marjoram and thyme leaves)
• 8 scallions (spring onions), green and white parts finely chopped
• 1 teaspoon salt
• ½ cup (4 fl oz/120 ml) olive oil
• ¼ teaspoon black pepper


Put the flours, salt, and sugar into a bowl and mix together. Make a well in the middle; add the oil, yeast, and half the water. Mix through with your fingers, adding more water and kneading until the dough comes together. If the mixture feels sticky, leave for 5 minutes then knead again. Repeat until you have a soft ball of dough. Alternatively, combine all the ingredients, but only half the water, in the bowl of a freestanding mixer fitted with the dough hook and mix on medium speed, adding water as necessary, until it comes together in a soft but robust ball. Rub with oil, cover the bowl with a damp dish towel, and set aside to rise for 1 hour.

Meanwhile, prepare the stuffing by placing all the filling ingredients into a large bowl and tossing to combine. Set aside until ready to use.

Once the dough has risen, divide into 10 equal-sized portions. Line a large tray with oiled plastic wrap (clingfilm). Place the dough on the tray. Let rest for 5-10 minutes.

Take one portion of dough and, with your hands, flatten it into a rough circle. Take about a tenth of the filling and spread it evenly over the pastry. Starting at the top use both hands to fold the pastry into thirds, oiling each layer as you fold. You should now have a long rectangle. Take one of the short sides and fold into thirds again, this time horizontally, oiling each layer as you go. You should now have a square shape. Oil the pastry again and set aside on an oiled surface and cover with oiled plastic wrap. Repeat with remaining pastry. Set aside to rest for 15 minutes while you preheat the oven to 475°F/240°C/Gas Mark 9.

Flatten it out with well oiled hands into a 8-inch/20-cm square, then place on a baking sheet. Repeat with the rest of the pastry. Bake for 7-12 minutes, or until a light golden color. Check the underside, if it has not browned, you may need to flip it and bake for 2 minutes to brown the bottom.

Remove from the oven and transfer to a wire rack to cool. Serve warm with halloumi cheese or Labaneh (page 26), a side of fresh vegetables, and a cup of sweet mint tea (page 237).

Eggplant (aubergine), yogurt, and nut salad
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Preparation Time: 15 minutes
Cooking Time: 20 minutes
Serves: 4-6


• 2 ¼ lb/1 kg (about 4 medium) eggplants (aubergines)
• olive oil, for brushing
• salt and black pepper
For the yogurt sauce
• 1 ½ cups (14 oz/400 g) Greek yogurt
• 1 small clove garlic, crushed
• ½ teaspoon salt
• ½ teaspoon lemon juice (optional)
For the garnish
• 2 tablespoons pomegranate seeds
• ½ cup (2 oz/50 g) lightly toasted mixed nuts, such as almonds, pistachios, hazelnuts
• small handful of green leaves such as arugula (rocket), dill, or chives


Preheat the broiler (grill) to high. Slice the eggplants (aubergines) into ¾-inch/1.5-cm rounds, brush both sides with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place the eggplants on an oven rack and broil (grill) for about 10 minutes on each side, or until they develop a golden brown exterior.

In the meantime, put all the ingredients for the yogurt sauce into a bowl and whisk together to a smooth consistency. The lemon juice is optional but it helps bring all the flavors together, especially if you are using a mellow yogurt, not a tangy one.

Once the eggplants are done, arrange in overlapping circles on a round platter. Spoon over the yogurt mixture then top with pomegranate seeds, toasted nuts, and green leaves.

Variation: Use zucchini (courgettes), cut in half and sliced lengthwise, instead of the eggplants and use walnuts, pomegranate seeds, and sumac for the garnish.

Jerusalem sesame bagels
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Preparation Time: 30 minutes + resting
Cooking Time:15 - 20 minutes
Makes: 6 bagels


For the Pastry

  • 4 ½ cups (1 lb 2 oz / 500 g) all-purpose (plain) white flour
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 ½ cups (12 fl oz / 350 ml) whole (full-fat) milk, warm
  • 1 tablespoon active dry (fast-action) yeast
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • olive oil

 For the sesame coating

  • 1 cup (5 oz / 150 g) hulled sesame seeds
  • 1 - 2 tablespoons grape molasses


Put all the dough ingredients except the olive oil into the bowl of a freestanding mixer fitted with the dough hook. Mix on medium speed until the dough comes together in a soft and pliable ball. Alternatively, mix in a large bowl and knead by hand until smooth and pliable. If the mixture appears too stiff, add a little milk and continue to knead. You are looking for a soft, elastic but robust dough. Rub with oil, cover the bowl with a damp dish towel or plastic wrap (clingfilm), and set aside to rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Meanwhile, prepare the sesame coating. In a large shallow bowl, combine the sesame seeds and grape molasses with 1 tablespoon of water. Mix, adding more water as necessary, until you have a wet mixture that is neither too sticky and thick that it clumps up, nor too thin. You just want to be able to coat the dough in the seeds and have them stick.

Once the dough has risen, gently punch down to release the air bubbles. Divide into 6 equal-sized portions and place on a lightly floured work surface. Roll and stretch each piece into a log about 8-12 inches/20-30 cm long, then attach the ends together to form a circle. Set aside to rest for 15 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 450°F/230°C/Gas Mark 8. Take each dough ring, dip it in the sesame mixture, and gently roll and stretch the ring until you have a long oval shape, similar to a stretched out "0". Repeat with each ring, then set aside on a baking sheet to rest a final time, about 10 minutes.

Place the baking sheet or sheets into the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes, or until a deep golden color and cooked through. Set aside on a wire rack to cool.

Serve warm with some za'atar, or white cheese and vegetables, and sweet tea. Freeze any leftovers for up to 1 month and reheat in oven before serving.

Special thanks to Phaidon and Reem Kassis for sharing these recipes with our members from The Palestinian Table. ©2017 Photograph credit Dan Perez.

A can and a plan


While cooks eschew most canned vegetables and fruits, there is one canned item that should always have space in your pantry. Canned beans (aka pulses) like chickpeas, butterbeans, and pintos are versatile items that can help you get dinner on the table in no time flat. Even esteemed chef Yotam Ottolenghi is a fan of canned beans, and has provided several recipes to make the most of them

In the preface to his recipes, Ottolenghi sings the praises of canned beans. "A can of pulses is the best pantry friend you can have," he says. "Yes, there are other serious contenders for that title, but, for me, there is no other bagged, jarred or tinned food that offers such a headstart in creating a quick meal that tastes as if it has been cooked slowly, carefully and thoughtfully from 100% raw ingredients."

While he doesn't mention it in this article, there is one recipe in which Ottolenghi says you should never, ever use canned chickpeas: hummus. In a tweet, the chef says it would be "sacreligious" to do so. That tweet had some pushback, with many people declaring they thought the practice was fine. If you're among the latter group, don't worry - your secret is safe with me. 

Photo of The speedy soup: Chickpeas and cabbage soup (Zuppa di verza e ceci) from The Guardian Cook supplement

Corsica by Nicolas Stromboni

Corsica: The Recipes by Nicolas Stromboni is a beautifully photographed book celebrating all that is Corsican. Far more than a collection of recipes, the pages here also reflect the people and the landscape of this island while exploring eighty incredible recipes designed to be prepared in anyone's home kitchen.

Relatively unexplored by visitors from outside Europe (although it attracts an estimated three million from France annually), Corsica is a Mediterranean island steeped in rich food culture. With incredible geography ranging from the mountains to the plains and the stunning coastline, Corsica has long been a well-loved idyll for those in the know. It is also home to a unique cuisine that blends the best of French and Italian food and that respects its homegrown produce: citrus fruits, grapes, chestnuts, cheese, herbs, fish, seafood, and charcuterie.

Tucked within the recipes are portraits of those who live and work there, and those instrumental in maintaining Corsica's rich food culture. You will meet cheesemaker, Jean-André Mameli, and learn his technique for making Brocciu cheese, a sheep's or goat's milk cheese. Then recipes utilizing the cheese such as Artichokes with Brocciu cheese or Chestnut polenta follow. Other portraits include those of fishermen, farmers, cooks, restauranteers and more. 

A Fiadone (a bottomless cheesecake), E Frappe (a light and delicate sweet fritter), and Polpetti in salsa rossa (veal meatballs) are other examples of dishes here along with myraid seafood and vegetable dishes. While immersing ourselves in the cuisine, we also learn about Corsica's donkeys, wine, hazelnut growers, food vocabulary and so much more. 

The Pork cutlets and Ciaccia, a dreamy potato and cheese pie, were both simple and delicious and need to be made again soon. This gorgeous book has put Corsica on my list of destinations to experience and until then I must be content to study its photos and recipes and dream.

Special thanks to Smith Street Books for sharing the following recipe with our members today as well as providing four copies of this book in our contest below open to our members in the US (2 copies) and New Zealand and Australia (2 copies).

Murtoli tart recipe by Jean Neel
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Serves 4

Equipment: an electric mixer, an ovenproof dish, a tart ring base

  • 50 g (1¾ oz) plain (all-purpose) flour
  • 50 g (1¾ oz) ground hazelnuts
  • 100 g (3½ oz) butter
  • 100 g (3½ oz) smoked Sartène cheese or parmesan cheese, grated
  • 1 egg
  • 2 eggplants (aubergines)
  • 2 zucchini (courgettes)
  • 3 onions
  • 8 tomatoes
  • 190 ml (6½ fl oz/¾ cup) olive oil, plus extra for drizzling
  • salt and pepper
  • 350 g (12½ oz) fresh brocciu cheese or firm ricotta
  • 10 g (¼ oz) marjoram and mint

The day before

In an electric mixer, combine the flour, ground hazelnuts, butter, cheese, egg and 2 teaspoons water. Form into a smooth ball. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

On the day

Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F).

Cut the eggplants, zucchini, onions and tomatoes into 5 mm (¼ in) slices and lay them, overlapping, in an ovenproof dish. Moisten with a drizzle of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Bake for about 25 minutes.

Reduce the oven temperature to 160°C (320°F).

Roll out the dough to a 5 mm (¼ in) thick circle and line the base of a tart tin. Prick with a fork and bake until light brown.

Return the oven temperature to 180°C (350°F). Mash the brocciu with a fork, then incorporate the olive oil and herbs. Season with salt and pepper.

Carefully arrange the roasted vegetables on the pastry, alternating the layers with brocciu. Scatter over a few pieces of brocciu to finish and bake for 20 minutes.

To drink A rosé from Clos Canarelli.

Notes: I owe this recipe to Jean Neel, when he was the chef at Domaine de Murtoli, in Sartène. My friends and I were truly addicted to his cheese and hazelnut sable pastry in particular.

Of course, this recipe is seasonal, but I admit that when in winter I have the desire to recreate the ambiance of that vineyard on my plate, I crack and use vegetables that aren't quite from the right season...but the pastry, that's always there. This dish can be served warm or cold.

Recipe excerpt courtesy of Smith Street Books from Corsica: The Recipes by Nicolas Stromboni. Photography by Sandra Mahut. 

The publisher is offering four copies of this book to EYB Members in the US, NZ and AU.   One of the entry options is to answer the following question in the comments section of this blog post.

Which recipe in the index would you try first?

Please note that you must be logged into the Rafflecopter contest before posting or your entry won't be counted. For more information on this process, please see our step-by-step help post. Be sure to check your spam filters to receive our email notifications. Prizes can take up to 6 weeks to arrive from the publishers. If you are not already a Member, you can join at no cost. The contest ends at midnight on April 22nd, 2018.

Kindle Deals - March 18, 2018

Act quickly if any of these cookbooks interest you, as I'm not sure how long they will remain on sale. Newer additions to this list begin at the top. I will update during the week and re-share on social media so check back.

Please note books range from .99 to 9.99 (the higher priced kindle books are typically more expensive for hard copies i.e., new titles and Thomas Keller and the like). Our links are universal and should take you to UK, CA and other Amazon sites. 

A reminder that I am continually updating our 2018 preview post, you may wish to bookmark that post in your browser for future reference and be sure you have entered all our giveaways. Our social media buttons can be found on the right lower sidebar of our home page along with links to our affiliate stores that help support the site and indexing efforts.

Most likely ending soon:


Titles still on sale from prior week:


A cook and a book


Members of cookbook clubs like the EYB Cookbook Club are used to working their way through cookbooks, asking others for advice, and offering their own. It's a great place learn how to decipher what a cookbook author means, or expound on changes that worked out better than the original text. 

If there is anything better than learning from your peers and hearing their thoughts on the latest cookbooks, it might be having your favorite cookbook author try a few recipes from someone else's book and provide commentary. If that sounds like an excellent idea, head on over to Food and Wine's website. Charlotte Druckman has a new column there called 'A Cook and a Book' that features cooks and authors trying recipes from new cookbook releases

Druckman described the new column in a recent tweet as "sorta like a cookbook review & sorta like a profile of a person of interest in his/her kitchen. sorta both those things but also not."  In the first installment, esteemed chef and author Nancy Silverton tries a couple of dishes from Nigella Lawson's new book At My Table

Even though she's written nine cookbooks, Silverton admits that she is terrible at following other people's recipes. She is dubious about some of Lawson's suggestions, including heating Greek yogurt and straining some of the excess egg white before poaching an egg. Nevertheless, she gamely follows the instructions and in the end is pleasantly surprised by one of the techniques. 

Special Offer from Interlink Books

Throughout the month of March Interlink Books will be celebrating women's voices and actions, especially those of the new generation of rising young activists who are not afraid to speak truth to power, challenge media, and fight for social justice, women's rights, and against unjust civil and human rights laws.

With every order you place, you will receive a surprise gift (a novel, a cookbook, a memoir, or a history book) selected by an Interlink staff member to suit your taste (one book per order valued at $15 to $30). Just visit one of the following websites: www.interlinkbooks.com, www.immigrantcookbook.net, www.soupforsyria.com, or www.palestineonaplate.netto place your order. You can also do so by calling 1-800-238-LINK.

Here is a look at a few of my favorite Interlink titles:

The Immigrant Cookbook: Recipes That Make America Great
is a beautiful book collected and edited by Leyla Moushabeck. Immigrant chefs contributed their stories and recipes to create this treasured volume. It made my best cookbooks of 2017 list but to call it a cookbook doesn't seem quite right - it is so much more than that. Read more about this book in my review.

The Aleppo Cookbook: Celebrating the Legendary Cuisine of Syria
by Marlene Matar is "a loving tribute to a little-known cuisine rich in flavors and traditions." Marlene Matar captures the beauty of Aleppo within the pages of this book and the love she has for this war-torn city is palpable. It breaks my heart that such a truly vibrant, visually stunning city has been reduced to rumble. It is my fervent hope that it can return to its former glory. With books like Cook for Syria, Soup for Syria and this beautiful book, we can all learn to appreciate and feed our hunger with knowledge of other cultures. With knowledge and understanding comes acceptance, tolerance and eventually love and appreciation. For more information on this title see my review and interview with Marlene.

Purchasing #CookforSyria Recipe Book will be a gift to yourself. It is not only a spectacular cookbook, but also provides the satisfaction of donating to help the Syrian humanitarian effort as all profits from the sale of this book is donated to charity.

Soup for Syria: Recipes to Celebrate Our Shared Humanity by Barbara Abdeni Massaad which was released in October of 2015 with a similar goal - to help those in need using food as a medium. At our very core, we all have the same basic needs: shelter, food and the knowledge that our loved ones are safe and healthy. Most of us are fortunate that we enjoy these things on a daily basis. The food community has found a way to help those whose basic needs have been obliterated. Food is a universal comfort and now a tool to spread awareness and raise money for aid. For more information on these books, see our post.

Wild Honey and Rye: Modern Polish Recipes by Ren Behan shares recipes that are approachable and appealing from something as basic as a Soft cheese with honey and walnuts on rye to pages devoted to pierogi all the way to her beautiful, homey Polish apple cake. This book is a feast for the eyes and the appetite. I have a few polish cookbooks in my collection, but this book tops the list as my favorite. If you buy one book on this cuisine, let it be this one. Our promotion for this title will share more information along with an interview with the author. The giveaway is still open so be sure to enter.


Coastline: The Food of Mediterranean Italy, France and Spain by Lucio Galletto and David Dale is a spectacular collection of stories, debates, beautiful images and delicious Mediterranean recipes covering salads, pasta sauces, pizza and pies, soups and stews, feasts and desserts from the fishing villages, farms and cobbled squares around the golden crescent. For more information on this title, please see my review post.

Adequate words do not exist to describe the vibrancy of Shane Delia's East/West: A Culinary Journey Through Malta, Lebanon, Iran, Turkey, Morocco, and Andalucia. To say it is beautiful is an understatement of epic proportions. For more information on this book, see my earlier review.

Other titles that I love include: Tasting Georgia (promotion coming soon), Mouneh being republished by Interlink in April, and Passione (promotion coming soon). 

A link to Interlink's international cookbook selection can be found here but be sure to check out all their titles as they publish far more than cookbooks.

A better way to temper your eggs


Many dishes both savory and sweet, ranging from silky custards to soothing soups, call for tempering egg yolks. The process can strike fear in the hearts of cooks because one misstep can lead to a clumpy, curdled disaster. Sometimes the technique is actually unnecessary, says Sohla El-Waylly, Assistant Culinary Editor at Serious Eats. She provides the when, why, and how of successfully tempering egg yolks.

First she tackles the why, which has to do with the unwinding of proteins found in egg yolks. After providing an indepth explanation of the science behind the process, El-Waylly turns to the when. Recipes that require the liquid to be hot when it is combined with the eggs require tempering, for instance when making avgolemono, the creamy Greek lemon and egg soup.

Since it would take an inordinate amount of time to cool down the lemon-infused chicken broth, combine it with egg yolks, and bring it back to temperature, tempering the eggs makes sense. But in applications where you aren't infusing a flavor into the liquid, which would include many custards, you can combine all of the ingredients together and heat them gently without the need for tempering. 

Tempering can be a temperamental process. Get the yolks too hot without anything to buffer the heat, and you will end up with a curlded mess than you can't fix. The traditional method is to ladle small amounts of hot liquid to the beaten egg yolks, but there is a more foolproof method: use a blender. You can use either a stick blender or regular blender to do the job, but the drawback is that you have to wash the blender. That might be a small price to pay for achieving that luxurious texture. 

Featured Cookbooks & Recipes

Do you find other people's comments on recipes helpful? Have you written your own recipe Notes? It's a great way to remind yourself how a dish turned out and share your experience with the EYB community. On each Recipe Details page you'll find a Notes tab.

Adding online recipes to your EYB Bookshelf is a really great way to expand your personal recipe collection. You can do this even if you have a free membership!

We're featuring online recipes from these books, magazines and blogs - check them out.

Happy cooking and baking everyone!


Member Photo of the Week:

Lemon-Pistachio Israeli Couscous (Couscous Israélien au Citron et aux Pistaches) from  My Paris Kitchen by David Lebovitz

Photo submitted by Madeleineandfriends. Have you uploaded any of your own photos yet? Learn more!



From Websites:

Tangerine, Ginger and Chocolate Tart from indexed A Good Appetite at The New York Times by Melissa Clark



From Cookbooks:


5 recipes from Between Harlem and Heaven: Afro-Asian-American Cooking for Big Nights, Weeknights, and Every Day by Alexander Smalls & JJ Johnson


10 recipes from  Cherish: Food to Make for the People You Love by Anne Shooter


5 recipes from  The Tivoli Road Bakery: Recipes and Notes from a Chef Who Chose Baking by Michael James with Pippa James

Enter The Tivoli Road Baker GIVEAWAY! (US, UK, AUS, NZ only)


10 recipes from Chinese Soul Food: A Friendly Guide for Homemade Dumplings, Stir-Fries, Soups, and More by Hsiao-Ching Chou

Enter the Chinese Soul Food GIVEAWAY! (US + WORLDWIDE)


1 recipe from The Comfort Food Diaries: My Quest for the Perfect Dish to Mend a Broken Heart by Emily Nunn

Enter The Comfort Food Diaries WORLDWIDE GIVEAWAY!

Cookware everywhere you turn


Scrolling through my social media feeds today, I admit I felt a bit overwhelmed with the volume of cookware-related tweets. Michael Symon was announcing his new line of branded pots and pans, Food52 was featuring a glass-lidded cast-iron brasier, and then I spied another post from Bon Appetit announcing Le Creuset's new tri-ply stainless steel cookware line. 

Those are just a few of the posts selling pots, pans, and bakeware. Then there are the blog posts that include twee coquettes, burnished vintage baking molds, cast iron of all hues and shapes, stunning ceramic pie pans, and an array of collectible tools. If we are living in a golden age of cookbooks, we must be living in a platinum age of cookware. 

The exponential advancement of technology may have outpaced that of cookware development, but in its own way, that has been amazing as well. Today we have new lines of cast iron that are finely machined for improved nonstick capabilities, while weighing about 30 percent less than the pans of yesteryear. Tri-ply stainless and explosion-bonded copper clad pans utilize space-age technologies in something you can use every day. 

We've even achieved marriages between techology and cookware, with smart bakeware that will send you a text when you cake is ready. What I find fascinating about much of this development is that unlike your cell phone, you can purchase one of the next-generation cast iron pans and pass it down to your children. While it is unlikely that the smart cookware or digital items like the Instant Pot will have the same longevity, it's comforting to know that your skillet will be sweating onions long after you are no longer standing behind the stove. 

I'm not quite ready to purchase the smart bakeware - or even stainless Le Creuset, for that matter. I do enjoy my new cast iron, which complements the hand-me-down pans I've had for years. And I will continue to take delight in witnessing both the technological leaps and the lasting value of quality made cookware and bakeware. We've featured several giveaways featuring the latter - and you'll be happy to know that many more are on the way!

Seen anything interesting? Let us know & we'll share it!