Food & Wine makes a move

 Food & Wine MagazineIt's no secret that print publications are struggling in the digital economy. Sometimes this means a magazine or newspaper will fold or make major changes. In the case of Food & Wine Magazine, we can be thankful it's the latter. The magazine just announced that it was relocating from New York to Alabama

Such a geographic shift may be puzzling, but the move makes sense. Food & Wine's parent company, Time Inc., recently built a sprawling complex in Birmingham, Alabama. Food & Wine joins other other publications owned by Time Inc.. including  Cooking Light and  Southern Living. 

Lest you think the move means that the magazine won't have sufficient resources, you can rest easy. The new home for the publication boasts 28 test kitchens and 13 photography bays and video studios. The digital arm of Food & Wine will remain in Lower Manhattan, in the space built for the magazine in 2015. 

Legendary restaurant critic and food writer Ruth Reichl said the move makes sense. Relocating to the Birmingham complex will better position Food & Wine when it comes to digital food publishing.  She says that sites like Food 52 and Eater "are just taking over that space, and they're building audiences fast. If you're a legacy magazine, you'd better figure out a way to do things that are more original, and you need resources to do that."

Cookbook Giveaway - The Book of Greens

The Book of Greens: A Cook's Compendium of 40 Varieties, from Arugula to Watercress, with More Than 175 Recipes by Jenn Louis and Kathleen Squires is a compilation of more than 175 recipes for simple, show-stopping fare guaranteed to inspire you to reach for new greens at the farmers' market, or use those that you are familiar with in new exciting ways.

For more information on this cookbook, please see our review post which shares a recipe for Mustard Green Pancakes. 

We are pleased to offer three copies of this title to our EYB Members in the US One of the entry options is to answer the following question in the comments section of this blog post.

Which recipe in the index would you like to try first?

Please note that you must be logged into the Rafflecopter contest before posting or your entry won't be counted. Please be sure to check your spam filters to make sure you receive our email notifications. Prizes can take up to 6 weeks to arrive from the publishers. If you are not already a Member, you can join at no cost. The contest ends at midnight on July 26th, 2017.

 

 

 

The Book of Greens - Jenn Louis

The Book of Greens: A Cook's Compendium of 40 Varieties, from Arugula to Watercress, with More Than 175 Recipes by Jenn Louis and Kathleen Squires is a compilation of more than 175 recipes for simple, show-stopping fare guaranteed to inspire you to reach for new greens at the farmers' market, or use those that you are familiar with in new exciting ways.

The Book of Greens is organized alphabetically by type of green, each entry features information on seasonality, nutrition, and prep and storage tips, along with innovative recipes.   

The Dandelion Greens, Prosciutto and Olive Picnic Cake looks amazing and I'm going to try it with something instead of olives and maybe even later today as it has cooled off a great deal here in Colorado. (I don't like olives - I've tried). Grilled Cabbage with Miso and Lime (I love miso), Pasta Dough with Tomato Leaves and Nori and Coconut Flour Buttermilk Biscuits with Sesame Shichimi Butter are other examples what this former Top Chef contestant has in store for you in this book. Jenn's book Pasta by Hand is gorgeous - and so is this title. It isn't one of those titles that will collect dust on your shelf. 

Update:  I made the loaf Saturday morning and while I couldn't wait to cut it to get a beauty shot - because we were hungry - it is still incredibly delicious.

Special thanks to Ten Speed Press and the author for sharing the Mustard Green Pancakes recipe below. I've made scallion pancakes before and these give me so many wonderful ideas to mix the tasty morsels up a bit. Be sure to head over to our contest page to enter our giveaway - you want this book.

 

MUSTARD GREEN PANCAKES

These aren't like breakfast pancakes; they are like the scallion pancakes you might find in a Chinese restaurant. If you love the sharp, strong flavor of mustard, then you will love these. Or if you don't want so much of a vegetal flavor, consider subbing in a milder green, such as spinach or chard. The dipping sauce drives home the Asian flavor.

MAKES 4 PANCAKES, SERVES 4
Pancakes

2 cups [280 g] all-purpose flour
1 cup [240 ml] boiling water
¼ cup [60 ml] toasted sesame oil
1 ounce [30 g] thinly sliced mustard greens (tender stems are okay)
¼ cup [60 ml] neutral vegetable oil Kosher salt
Dipping Sauce

2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon thinly sliced green onions (green parts only)
½ teaspoon peeled and grated fresh ginger
2 teaspoons sugar

Put the flour in a food processor. With the motor running, slowly drizzle in 3⁄4 cup of the boiling water. Process for 15 seconds. If dough does not come together, drizzle in more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until it just comes together. Transfer to a work surface and knead a few times to form a smooth ball. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rest for 30 minutes at room temperature.
 
Divide the dough into four even pieces and roll each into a smooth ball. Working one ball at a time, roll out into a disk, about 8 inches [20 cm] in diameter. Using a pastry brush, paint a very thin layer of sesame oil over the top of the disk. Roll the disk up like a cylinder, then start at the end and coil the dough like a snail's shell. Flatten gently with your hand and roll again into an 8-inch [30-cm] disk. 

Paint with another layer of sesame oil, lay an even layer of one-quarter of the sliced mustard greens, and roll up like a cylinder again. Again, coil like a snail shell, flatten gently, and re-roll into a 7-inch disk. Repeat with the remaining dough and mustard greens to make three more pancakes.

Combine all the dipping sauce ingredients and set aside at room temperature.
To cook the pancakes, heat the oil in an 8-inch (20-cm) nonstick or cast-iron pan over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, after 2 to 3 minutes, carefully slip one pancake into the hot oil. Cook, shaking the pan gently until the first side is an even golden brown, about 2 minutes. Carefully flip with a spatula or tongs and continue to cook until the second side is and even golden brown, about 2 more minutes. Season with salt, cut into 6 wedges.

Serve immediately with the sauce for dipping.

Repeat with the remaining pancakes. 

OTHER GREENS THAT WORK IN THIS RECIPE:
nettles, spinach, lamb's quarters
 

"Reprinted with permission from The Book of Greens by Jenn Louis, copyright © 2017. Photography by Ed Anderson. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC."

 

How to keep your tomatoes from getting wrinkly

 tomatoes

Perfectly ripe tomatoes are a favorite part of summer. Their brief season (brief, at least, to those of us in the far northern latitudes) is something people look forward to during the long winter months. Once the season hits, it is easy to get into trouble buying too much at the farmer's market so proper storage is essential. Over at Serious Eats, Kenji López-Alt provides us with "one weird trick" for storing tomatoes that actually works

A few years ago, Kenji did a side-by-side testing that proved - contrary to conventional wisdom - that the refrigerator was actually the best place to store ripe tomatoes. You do need to return them to room temperature before eating for best results. Now Kenji has another tip, this time one that will prevent the tops of tomatoes from wrinkling if you are keeping them for a few days. 

The suggestion is simple: store tomatoes stem-side down on a plate. The reason this works is because while tomato skins keep moisture inside the tomato, it can escape through the fragile stem end once the stem is removed. Storing the tomatoes upside down keeps the moisture inside the tomato. Kenji repeated this test several times, achieving identical results in each instance. It's great when a tip can be so simple and yet so effective. 

Another milestone in the books

 cookbooks

Thanks to the hard work of both our professional and Member indexers, we have achieved another milestone at Eat Your Books - over 1.5 million indexed recipes! When we break down that impressive figure, we find over 1.2 million recipes from cookbooks; over 151,000 magazine recipes; and nearly 250,000 online recipes, including about 4,600 video recipes. Over 400,000 recipes (including book recipes and online recipes) have been indexed by EYB Members - thank you so much for your efforts. 

A deeper dive into the data reveals that about half of the recipes are associated with a specific ethnicity, with European countries accounting for the biggest share. You can find a recipe from almost every country or culture on the planet. Somewhat surprising to me was that were one and half times the number of Italian recipes as French recipes. Another interesting tidbit: nearly one-third of the recipes in the Library are vegetarian, and over 10 percent are vegan.

This staggering number of options can result in decision paralysis, which is why I am glad there are loads of ways to filter the list - by ingredient, recipe type, meal course, ethnicity, author, and more. The only disappointing thing about this incredible selection is that since the average person eats about 90,000 meals in a lifetime, I will only be able to sample a fraction of the delicious recipes on the site. Eat Your Books is indeed a bountiful resource - happy cooking, everyone!

Milk Street Live - Fall Tour & PBS Debut

Christopher Kimball is taking Milk Street on the road this Fall and tickets are on sale now. Please note pre-sale access ends June 29, 2017 using code MSKLIVE.

Kimball will be signing the first Milk Street Cookbook after the events for all VIP ticket holders. If you can't make one of his appearances, publication date is set for September 12th for this debut Milk Street title which can be preordered by using our Buy Book button.

Plans are for more on-stage audience interaction including tastings, cook-offs and competitions with the entire audience being a part of the live tasting. 

Plans for a behind-the-scenes tour of Milk Street as well as exploring the team's culinary trips from Thailand to finding the best hummus in the Middle East.

Milk Street Live's schedule is available on our World Calendar of Cookbook Events.

Check your local PBS listings this September as Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Television will be airing its first show with lots of new co-hosts, guests, and cooks. American Public Television will distribute the show, and they will be co-presenters along with WGBH Boston.

 

Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat by Samin Nosrat

Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking by Samin Nosrat is a master class in cooking that condenses decades of professional experience into just four simple elements - salt, fat, acid and heat.

The author learned to cook at Chez Panisse and has been hailed as "the next Julia Child" from NPR's All Things Considered and her mentor Alice Waters has declared that Samin is "America's next great cooking teacher".

Samin's first sentence of her introduction - "Anyone can cook anything and make it delicious." - sets the tone for this book. There is something magical about this book - it's content, the incredible illustrations and the wealth of knowledge - all combined will transform us all into kitchen wizards. 

This indispensable tome delivers 100 essential recipes - and dozens of variations - to take the author's lessons and put them into use to make bright, balanced vinaigrettes, perfectly caramelized roast vegetables, tender braised meats, and light, flaky pastry doughs. All of this information is packaged with 150 illustrations and infographics that will help us understand the world of flavor.

I have always been a good cook and now I believe I am a great cook because I remotely understand the balance of salt, fat, acid and heat - it took me a while to get there by myself and now I am sharpening that knowledge. Salt, Fat, Acid and Heat is on par with the greatness of The Food Lab and will become the teaching cookbook for this generation. I'm predicting you will hear this title repeatedly come to the surface during cookbook award season.

Samin has events scheduled check our calendar to see if she will be in your area. Special thanks to the Simon & Schuster for sharing two recipes with our members. Be sure to head over to our contest page to enter our giveaway for this must-have title. 

Caesar Dressing

Makes about 1 ½ cups

4 salt-packed anchovies (or 8 filets), soaked and fileted
¾ cup stiff Basic Mayonnaise (page 375) (below)
1 garlic clove, finely grated or pounded with a pinch of salt
3 to 4 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon white wine vinegar
3-ounce chunk of Parmesan, finely grated (about 1 cup), plus more for serving
¾ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
Freshly ground black pepper
Salt

Coarsely chop the anchovies and then pound them into a fine paste in a mortar and pestle. The more you break them down, the better the dressing will be.

In a medium bowl, stir together the anchovies, mayonnaise, garlic, lemon juice, vinegar, Parmesan, Worcestershire sauce, and pepper. Taste with a leaf of lettuce, then add salt and adjust acid as needed. Or, practicing what you learned about Layering Salt, add a little bit of each salty ingredient to the mayonnaise, bit by bit. Adjust the acid, then taste and adjust the salty ingredients until you reach the ideal balance of Salt, Fat, and Acid. Has putting a lesson you read in a book into practice ever been this delicious? I doubt it.

To make the salad, use your hands to toss the greens and Torn Croutons with an abundant amount of dressing in a large bowl to coat evenly. Garnish with Parmesan and freshly ground black pepper and serve immediately.

Refrigerate leftover dressing, covered, for up to 3 days.

Ideal for romaine and Little Gem lettuce, chicories, raw or blanched Kale, shaved Brussels sprouts, Belgian endive.

Mayonnaise

There might not be a sauce more polarizing than mayonnaise, but I fall firmly in the camp of the devoted. And, as a teacher, I don't think there's a better way to illustrate the power of a little kitchen science than by making, breaking, and fixing a mayonnaise with my students. It's like a little miracle, every time. Refer back to the walkthrough on page 86 for a refresher on all of the nuances of making and fixing a mayonnaise.

When making mayonnaise as the base for a sauce, such as Tartar or Caesar Dressing, leave it unsalted and make it as stiff as possible to account for all the other ingredients you'll be adding that will season and thin it out. On the other hand, to season a plain mayonnaise for spreading, dissolve the salt in a few tablespoons of water or whatever form of acid you plan to add, whether it's lemon juice or vinegar. If you add salt without dissolving it first, you'll have to wait a while for the mayonnaise to completely absorb it before you get an accurate idea of how it tastes. If you choose this route, add salt gradually, stopping to taste and adjust along the way.

To lend a Mediterranean flavor to Aïoli, Herb Mayonnaise, or Rouille you plan to serve with Italian, French, or Spanish food, use olive oil. To make an American-style base to use in Classic Sandwich Mayo or Tartar Sauce, use a neutral-tasting oil such as grapeseed or expeller-pressed canola.

Basic Mayonnaise
Makes about ¾ cup

1 egg yolk at room temperature
3/4 cup oil (refer to page 374 to help you decide what type of oil to use)

Place the egg yolk in a deep, medium metal or ceramic bowl. Dampen a tea towel and roll it up into a long log, then form it into a ring on the counter. Place the bowl inside the ring-this will hold the bowl in place while you whisk. (And if whisking by hand is simply out of the question, feel free to use a blender, stand mixer, or food processor.)

Use a ladle or bottle with a nozzle to drip in the oil a drop at a time, while whisking the oil into the yolk. Go. Really. Slowly. And don't stop whisking. Once you've added about half of the oil, you can start adding a little more oil at once. If the mayonnaise thickens so much that it's impossible to whisk, add a teaspoon or so water-or whichever acid you're planning on adding later on-to help thin it out.

If the mayonnaise breaks, refer to page 86 for tips on how to fix it.

Cover and refrigerate leftovers for up to 3 days.

Recipe reprinted from Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat with permission of Simon & Schuster and the author. Illustrations by Wendy MacNaughton. 

Cookbook Giveaway - Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat

Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking by Samin Nosrat is a master class in cooking that condenses decades of professional experience into just four simple elements - salt, fat, acid and heat.

For more information on this invaluable book, please see our review post which shares two recipes Caesar dressing and mayonnaise and examples of the beautiful illustrations that can be found here.

We are pleased to offer three copies of this title to our EYB Members in the US. One of the entry options is to answer the following question in the comments section of this blog post.

Which recipe in the index would you like to try first?

Please note that you must be logged into the Rafflecopter contest before posting or your entry won't be counted. Please be sure to check your spam filters to make sure you receive our email notifications. Prizes can take up to 6 weeks to arrive from the publishers. If you are not already a Member, you can join at no cost. The contest ends at midnight on July 25th, 2017. 

 

A lasting legacy

pains de amande cookies

A few days ago we had to share the sad news that baking legend Flo Braker had passed away. The news shocked and saddened bakers worldwide. Today the newspaper that carried her longtime baking column, The San Francisco Chronicle, and its staff looked back at Flo's long and storied career with a baker's dozen of her best recipes. 

The recipe that cemented my admiration for Flo was the Miniature tartlet pastry from her book Sweet Miniatures. It's a simple recipe, but it always turns out perfectly - a rarity in any baking recipe. The dough is forgiving, allowing you to roll out the scraps multiple times without the crust becoming tough. Since I began using this recipe, I haven't been tempted to try another because I cannot imagine anything can top its combination of ease and quality.

I've made several other excellent recipes from that book, but was surprised to see another of my favorites under Flo's name in the Library. For over a decade I have been making Lavender-lemon bundt cake, a recipe written on the packaging of a Nordicware Bundt pan that I purchased. I copied the recipe into my personal database (of course, this was pre-EYB) and if I noted an author's attribution at the time it did not register. But it stands to reason that a recipe that good was developed by one of the best bakers around. The cake has remained a staple of my baking repertoire ever since.

The SF Chronicle staff and I are not the only ones to reminisce about our favorite Flo Braker recipe. When he learned of Flo's death, David Lebovitz shared her recipe for Pain d'amande cookies pictured above, which he noted became a permanent fixture of the Chez Panisse menu. Flo inspired countless home cooks and professionals alike on their baking journeys, and her legacy will live on in the recipes that will undoubtedly be passed down to the next generation. What is your favorite Flo Braker recipe? 

District Six Huis Kombuis - South African Cookbook

District Six Huis Kombuis: Food & Memory Cookbook by Tina Smith is a 2016 World Gourmand Award Winner in the culinary travel division. NPR covered this fascinating title that shares the stories and memories of a mixed-race section of South Africa where Europeans, Asians, Africans, Christians, Muslims and Jews called home before it was declared a whites-only area. As the NPR article states, by the early 1980's nearly 60,000 people were forcibly removed from District Six. This wasn't the only area affected by the apartheid movement but it is the most documented perhaps due to its central location.

The District Six Museum in Cape Town has worked diligently on bringing the former residents of this area back together and the result of those meetings come to life in District Six Huis Kombuis: Food and Memory Cookbook. The publication of this book is part of the museum's committment to preserve the culture of this lost community and to commemorate the integration of food and cultural heritage through personal stories, recipes, historical images and craft work.

Huis kombuis  means "home kitchen" in Afrikaans and this book shares more than recipes and traditions of the original residents of District Six - it breathes life back into this forgotten section and people of South Africa - a very tight community where the best part was the sharing of food.

From the publisher's website, QuiverTree Publications:

The book is a culmination of memories and narrative. It weaves through the days of a typical week in District Six, focusing on traditional family recipes that were prepared with love and often limited resources. This is a visual celebration of the vibrancy and warmth of the community - who foraged, preserved, baked and cooked together.

I have a passion for books of this nature that bring the treasured past and a community of people back to the forefront where it should be. I hope to bring you more information on this title soon. 

Update: I've now had a quick look at the pdf version of this incredible book and it is truly stunning. I will be adding more information to this post in the next week. It is worth every penny to have it shipped overseas. 

Seen anything interesting? Let us know & we'll share it!

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