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Trends in flavors/ingredients   Go to last post Go to last unread
#42 Posted : Thursday, September 1, 2022 10:54:14 PM(UTC)

I like heirloom tomatoes for the purpose of making sandwiches from 2 or 3 varieties, not for the usual uses of tomatoes.


But one case in which my taste buds seem to be screwed in backwards is my preference for Dannon plain low-fat yogurt to Greek yogurt. Dannon has a tanginess that Greek yogurt does not have. There's supply-chain problem with this yogurt, so I buy it when I can.


That's another flavor trend: no yogurt but Greek yogurt.

#44 Posted : Friday, September 2, 2022 9:20:21 AM(UTC)

Originally Posted by: bittrette Go to Quoted Post
That's another flavor trend: no yogurt but Greek yogurt.


Greek yogurt in the US.  Wonder if it is the same in other western countries?  I always buy Trader Joe's Greek whole plain and also their cream top whole.  These are my favorites. 

#43 Posted : Saturday, September 3, 2022 8:21:51 AM(UTC)

Originally Posted by: bittrette Go to Quoted Post
I like heirloom tomatoes for the purpose of making sandwiches from 2 or 3 varieties, not for the usual uses of tomatoes.


But one case in which my taste buds seem to be screwed in backwards is my preference for Dannon plain low-fat yogurt to Greek yogurt. Dannon has a tanginess that Greek yogurt does not have. There's supply-chain problem with this yogurt, so I buy it when I can.


That's another flavor trend: no yogurt but Greek yogurt.


I don't know if you're interested in making your own yogurt, but when I did it was always VERY tangy.

#45 Posted : Saturday, September 3, 2022 10:46:37 AM(UTC)

Originally Posted by: Rinshin Go to Quoted Post
Greek yogurt in the US.  Wonder if it is the same in other western countries?  I always buy Trader Joe's Greek whole plain and also their cream top whole.  These are my favorites.


I was having this conversation with some people on twitter recently! Greek yoghurt is delicious but not for everything - I find in South Asian cooking you need an old-fashioned pot-set yoghurt with more tang and less richness.

#46 Posted : Saturday, September 3, 2022 11:17:34 AM(UTC)

Thank you, Barb_N, but I'm so overwhelmed by the projects I have already that I don't have the energy to take on a new one. I'll just look in the stores for Dannon.

#47 Posted : Saturday, September 3, 2022 1:36:59 PM(UTC)

Pepperidge Farm has just jumped on the pumpkin-spice bandwagon: it has just come out with Milano pumpkin-spice cookies.

#48 Posted : Wednesday, September 7, 2022 12:26:16 AM(UTC)

And now Tate's cookies has done the same.

#49 Posted : Wednesday, September 7, 2022 12:59:30 AM(UTC)

Didn't the whole pumpkin-spice thing originate with Pfeffernüsse? Which, honestly, I don't care for either. I have several nieces who live for PSL season. I on the other hand take my coffee strong and black. I want my coffee to taste like coffee, certainly not like pumpkin pie.

#50 Posted : Wednesday, September 7, 2022 3:36:14 AM(UTC)

I haven't eaten pfeffernüsse but I like gingersnaps, and since I haven't eaten the trendy cookies, is it necessary to include the taste of pumpkin (or winter squash) in order to qualify for this craze?


Maybe in wet foods it is (e.g. smoothies, custards), but is it the same in baked goods - or does it mean pumpkin pie spice?


As for pumpkin-spice coffee, I hate flavored coffee in general. When I got some as a freebie I gave it to a flavored-coffee-loving friend.

#51 Posted : Wednesday, September 7, 2022 9:22:08 AM(UTC)

bittrette - pumpkin pie spice or pumpkin spice is a spice blend and doesn't contain any pumpkin. It was traditionally used in pumpkin pies in the USA. It usually contains cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves and allspice so is similar to the British mixed spice.

#52 Posted : Wednesday, September 7, 2022 12:05:36 PM(UTC)

I know about pumpkin-pie spice, tho I consider it much more fun to mix one's own pie spice.


What I'm asking about is the pumpkin-spice CRAZE that is with us every fall (sorry I can't make italics on this site).


If I ordered pumpkin-spice mousse, for instance, I would expect it to taste like pumpkin pie, with spices added to a base of what tasted like pumpkin or winter squash.


But I would have no such expectation with a pumpkin-spice cookie. Or might I? One baked thing I like to make in the colder months is pumpkin muffins, which contain both pumpkin purée and pumpkin-pie spice.


So I'm asking what the craze is about - spiced pumpkin or pumpkin-pie spice.


Probably the best way to find out is to buy some baked thing that is part of the craze.

#53 Posted : Wednesday, September 7, 2022 5:53:33 PM(UTC)

It was reported in the news today that Merriam Webster has added "pumpkin spice" to their dictionary. There were other food words added as well, along with the term "shrinkflation" we are well aware of with packaged food:


https://www.foodandwine....nary-new-food-words-2022

#54 Posted : Thursday, September 8, 2022 6:19:52 AM(UTC)

Sounds like a case of the middle word dropping out, like "climate denier" or "mock neck." A real mock-neck sweater would be unwearable, because it would have no hole for the head.

#55 Posted : Thursday, September 15, 2022 11:43:32 PM(UTC)

The pumpkin-spice craze, it turns out, can be either of the two things mentioned before. Today at the supermarket I saw Bon Maman pumpkin spice spread, with pumpkins as its first-named ingredient.


But a nearby bagel café serves Hanley & Sons tea, including pumpkin-pie spice. I figure this is like their cinnamon-spice tea, tea flavored with spices.

#56 Posted : Monday, October 3, 2022 1:16:19 AM(UTC)

Regarding Pumpkin Spice, I apologize in advance to those who I offend with this, but I found this funny in a Monty Python sort of way:


https://shirt.woot.com/o...n?ref=w_cnt_top20_13_img


As John Cleese said, after opening the eulogy for Graham Chapman at Graham's funeral with "Graham Chapman, co-author of the 'Parrot Sketch,' is no more. He has ceased to be, bereft of life, he rests in peace, he has kicked the bucket, etc., etc., etc.", "Anything for him [Graham Chapman] but mindless good taste."

#57 Posted : Monday, October 3, 2022 1:00:21 PM(UTC)

More on the pumpkin-spice craze:


As I noted, Bonne Maman pumpkin spice spread has pumpkin as the first ingredient. That can't be true of baked goods in the usual sense of the term - they must have flour as the first ingredient, and usually other things like fat and leavening.


But Thomas's pumpkin-spice English muffins and Pepperidge Farm pumpkin-spice bread are both (I quote) "made with real pumpkin," presumably enough to have a pumpkin-pie taste.


Pumpkin-spice tea probably has no pumpkin. Pepperidge Farm pumpkin-spice cookies have no pumpkin, just spices, and annatto for coloring.


Bonne Maman pumpkin-spice spread went very fast at the nearest supermarket to me. But you can still get it at the next nearest supermarket,, the one that carries Bonne Maman lemon curd.

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