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Japanese cauliflower   Go to last post Go to last unread
#1 Posted : Wednesday, October 16, 2019 6:15:43 PM(UTC)
I've been seeing a lot of Japanese cauliflower at the farmers' market lately, and I'd love to know how to prepare it. But when I search for cooking advice or a recipe, all I find is recipes for regular cauliflower cooked Japanese style.
That's not what I'm looking for. Japanese cauliflower is not tightly packed at all. It looks like a giant Queen Anne's lace, mostly pale green stems without much flower. What flower there is is whitish, like regular cauliflower.

Maybe there was so much left near the end of the day because customers didn't know what to do with it?

Do you have any ideas?
#2 Posted : Wednesday, October 16, 2019 6:47:06 PM(UTC)

Originally Posted by: bittrette Go to Quoted Post
I've been seeing a lot of Japanese cauliflower at the farmers' market lately, and I'd love to know how to prepare it. But when I search for cooking advice or a recipe, all I find is recipes for regular cauliflower cooked Japanese style.


To my surprise, I find no mention of any specific cauliflower variant in any of my Asian vegetable reference books. I believe Japanese cauliflower is the same as Fioretto flowering cauliflower but I can not prove it. See these Asian recipes:


#3 Posted : Wednesday, October 16, 2019 9:21:34 PM(UTC)

I think it might also be known as Karifurore. More info here: https://www.specialtypro...ower/karifurore_9550.php


The only recipe it links to is the last one that mjes linked too, but perhaps another name might help for searching?

#4 Posted : Thursday, October 17, 2019 4:41:10 AM(UTC)

I was intrigued and did not know this veg before! I have never seen it in either France or the UK


So looked it up and found a couple more links:


-https://www.thedevilwearsparsley.com/2018/03/20/creamed-tarragon-truffle-fioretto/


- https://kitchen.nine.com.au/healthy/kung-pao-fioretto-cauli-blossom-recipe/c695afa0-6c93-49fe-92e6-3daf19b8fc89


- http://pattietierney.blogspot.com/2018/02/parmesan-roasted-fioretto-cauliflower.html

#5 Posted : Thursday, October 17, 2019 9:43:27 AM(UTC)
Thank you, mjes and Agaillard. Yes, it goes by at least 6 names:

Karifurore
Fioretto
Biancoli
Stick cauliflower
Sweet sprouting cauliflower
Flowering cauliflower

In addition, one of the sites suggests cooking it as you would broccolini.
#6 Posted : Thursday, October 17, 2019 4:06:55 PM(UTC)

As mentioned by others,  it is relatively new variety developed in Japan.  Regular cauliflower is not that popular in Japan except in things like marinated caulifower, carrots, pepper etc mx similar to some tapa style marinated dishes.  The stalks more favored.  


i see this used in many ways including wrapping thin meat like pork or beef  around the stalks and pan cooked in various sauces, frito misto, stir fries, in quick marinades, shrimp, mayo like chili mayo shrimp with karifore and made into salads, etc.  you can use as in whole broccoli with stalks.


also known as fioretto and cauliflore in japan.

#7 Posted : Friday, October 18, 2019 1:31:47 AM(UTC)

I entered some of the recipes so next time someone asks we can tell them to search EYB. I did a search on fioretto which returned 54 recipes - only the last one actually used fioretto ... the others all had cauliflower and some flowering ingredient.

#8 Posted : Saturday, October 19, 2019 9:37:59 PM(UTC)
I just saved the fioretto salad recipe that mjes linked to to my bookshelf
#9 Posted : Sunday, October 27, 2019 3:33:42 PM(UTC)
Well, she who will not when she may, when she will she shall have nay. Since the day I saw piles of fioretto at the farmers' market, I never saw it again.

Or even broccolini, for that matter.
#10 Posted : Monday, November 4, 2019 1:25:23 AM(UTC)
Last Saturday I went to my favorite stand at the Union Square Greenmarket. Got only a little of the lettuce I was hoping for, but at the same booth I managed to snag some fioretto and what I think is broccolini.
#11 Posted : Monday, November 4, 2019 9:30:48 PM(UTC)

Have fun!

#12 Posted : Tuesday, November 5, 2019 7:45:03 AM(UTC)

I think it's also known as caulilini. They were selling that at Eataly NYC last week - I'd never seen it before. Is it the same stuff?

#13 Posted : Thursday, September 16, 2021 9:58:42 PM(UTC)

Boy am I glad that I posted this question to EYB about a year ago. I saw it again this past Monday - the whitish cruciferous vegetable that looks like cauliflower, broccoli and broccolini, but most of all like a giant Queen Anne's lace.


It was at the same stand where it was last year, and then as now there was a lot of it near closing time, either because a lot of vegetable shoppers don't know what to do with it or because the farmers brought a super truckload of it to market.


Next time I see it in a farmers' market I'm going to remember this thread.

#14 Posted : Thursday, September 16, 2021 10:33:46 PM(UTC)

It's interesting to see how the different names are being picked up in cookbooks and magazines. There are just 5 recipes in the Library for flowering caaliflower or fioretto - all online recipes.  And I just had to add caulini to our ingredient database for the first time for this recipe from the new issue of Delicious Magazine Australia. So it has not spread very far yet in recipes. 

#15 Posted : Friday, September 17, 2021 3:36:02 AM(UTC)

Wow - a seventh name for the same vegetable. This is why databases have controlled vocabularies.


Thanx, Jane.

#16 Posted : Friday, September 17, 2021 5:55:30 AM(UTC)

I think fioretto look beautiful.  I can see this grilled next to nicely charred protein source.  Regular cauliflower just won't look the same.  I wish I can find this in Bay Area.  You are lucky you can find all these wonderful variations. 

#17 Posted : Friday, November 5, 2021 8:14:27 PM(UTC)

Sort of lucky. One day it shows up at the market, next week it doesn't. I should learn to seize the day.

#18 Posted : Sunday, November 7, 2021 11:02:28 AM(UTC)

I'd never heard of it, but it looks similar to the cauliflower I've seen in SE Asia which is pulled apart into little floret, then stir fried often in noodle dishes

#19 Posted : Sunday, November 7, 2021 6:02:47 PM(UTC)
Originally Posted by: StokeySue Go to Quoted Post

I'd never heard of it, but it looks similar to the cauliflower I've seen in SE Asia which is pulled apart into little floret, then stir fried often in noodle dishes



This got me curious what you saw. Since cauliflower or fioretto require cool weather to grow, it seems unlikely grown in hot southeast Asia unless it was being imported. I wish I can see the veggie you remember seeing.
#20 Posted : Monday, November 8, 2021 1:30:48 PM(UTC)

Originally Posted by: Rinshin Go to Quoted Post
This got me curious what you saw. Since cauliflower or fioretto require cool weather to grow, it seems unlikely grown in hot southeast Asia unless it was being imported. I wish I can see the veggie you remember seeing.


I saw it in Myanmar (Burma), the hills in the Shan state are cool in winter (very cold sometimes)  and cauliflwers grow well there. The local variety is quite yellowish, and the ladies in the market pull apart the heads (which tend to be large) to create delicate, slender, florets, which look a bit like they might have sprouted, and then sell them by the tin (roughly equivalent to a measuring cup)


Cauliflower is not common throughout Myanmar, but the Shan do cook with it and make fresh pickles.


Here's a recipe from MiMi Aye, though the photograph was taken in London made with ordinary British cauliflower; I ate something very similar in Myanma.


https://www.greatbritish...ower-egg-scramble-recipe

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