Herbivoracious: A Flavor Revolution with 150 Vibrant and Original Vegetarian Recipes by Michael Natkin

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Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Middle Eastern bread salad (Fattoush)

    • jaelsne on July 08, 2021

      Excellent, easy recipe from an excellent cookbook.

  • Crispy polenta cakes with white beans and morels

    • jaelsne on October 14, 2012

      My family LOVED this dish! I don't remember having used morels before, but they will be a welcome addition to my future meals. The mushrooms were meaty, and gave a wonderful flavor to the broth. When I make it again, I will probably double the amount of beans.

  • Middle Eastern rice and lentil pilaf (Mujadara)

    • jaelsne on August 30, 2013

      This was absolutely delicious. Followed the recipe almost exactly. My husband dislikes caramelized onions, so we did the "quick" option of frying them over higher heat. I also added a miniscule amount of extra seasoning after tasting. I like the fact that the seasoning is light--it makes it a very fresh-tasting dish.

  • Chana masala with mushrooms

    • jaelsne on September 18, 2012

      This recipe may not suit every taste, but our family decided that this was the best chana masala recipe that I've made. It is highly fragrant, not at all like some of the watered-down-for-American-taste chanas that I've tried. We thought it might taste too strongly spiced until we added the final layer of mustard seeds and oil. Fabulous!

  • Caramel-cooked tofu

    • jaelsne on September 23, 2020

      Another winning recipe from this cookbook. My husband devoured it and pleaded for me to make it again. I followed the recipe exactly, using four fresh Thai chilis. It could have used a little more spice. The sauce was sweet, as it had to be for caramelization to take place. Very easy recipe, though I’m glad I’m not the one to clean the pan I

  • Brussels sprout and apple hash

    • jaelsne on October 03, 2020

      I made this dish for a potluck dinner party and it was well received. I think it’s absolutely delicious. I made it per the recipe, using apple cider vinegar rather than champagne vinegar and added tart Montmarcy cherries. I don’t give five stars often!

    • radishseed on October 30, 2012

      This is really good. I made mine with some Asian pears instead of an apple, and added some sweet potatoes because I was craving them. It was great as a dinner side dish, and all by itself for lunch the next day.

  • Banana raita

    • radishseed on October 21, 2013

      Mmmm. I love this.

  • Chiang mai curry noodles (Khao soi)

    • radishseed on November 06, 2012

      As written, I thought this recipe was too rich to eat as a soup (so much coconut milk), except in very small portions. However, it made a great curry sauce, eaten over rice, and it was good as a soup after thinning it with broth. I added cooked broccoli and mushrooms to the leftovers, because I wanted some vegetables in there.

  • Red curry delicata squash

    • MelMM on February 01, 2019

      10-5-2017 Used my own homemade curry paste. The delicata squash cooks quickly and doesn't need to be peeled, so this is a nice weeknight dish.

  • Kimchi stew with shiitake and daikon (Kimchi jigae)

    • Emily Hope on February 09, 2013

      This was good, straightforward and relatively quick to make. Pretty close in taste to kimchi chigae that I've had in restaurants, if lacking a bit of funk. My kimchi was pretty spicy, so I didn't need to add any extra chili. I also only used 1 tbsp of soy sauce and it was plenty salty. Served with pan fried rice rolls.

  • Chili borracho

    • Emily Hope on March 25, 2013

      In the end, this turned out to be a very nice vegetarian chili with great depth of flavor--but I felt like I really had to wrestle it to the ground to get it to turn out well. His suggestion of 33 minutes in the pressure cooker wasn't enough time--not surprising given the salt and acid included in the recipe (which can toughen bean skins). I made a double batch, so I tried 40 minutes in the p.c. for the second round, and that worked well. However, I felt that the beans hadn't really absorbed the flavor of the sauce, so rather than reducing the sauce separately as he suggests, I cooked the beans and sauce together until the sauce reduced, which took quite a while (at least an hour). I'm also wary of chilis that call for beer as I tend to find the hops make them bitter, so I reduced the amount of beer (carefully chosen for non-hoppiness) by about 1/3, and the chili was still a bit bitter and needed a pinch of sugar. But, it was highly praised by the vegetarians at the superbowl party!

  • Sichuan dry-fried green beans and tofu

    • Emily Hope on July 17, 2013

      As vegetarian stir-frys go, this was a pretty tasty one--the grean beans get a nice sear, and the sichuan preserved vegetables add a pleasantly funky note (they were, however, challenging for me to find at the asian grocery store--check the refrigerated aisle!) Perhaps not quite as good as the Chinese restaurant that used to be up the street from us in SF, but close, and a little less greasy. However, it did seem to take quite a while to make, between the veg prep, the chopping, and the multiple sautéing steps, so don't expect a quick meal, at least the first time out. Served with brown rice and shredded carrots with lime juice/fish sauce/roasted peanut oil.

  • Argentine parsley sauce (Chimichurri)

    • Krisage on July 29, 2017

      Nice as is. Used white wine vinegar. Also added a small seeded jalapeno and 1 tsp Mexican oregano with good results.

  • Tempeh-filled potstickers (Gyoza)

    • blozoff on May 17, 2020

      I would prefer less sesame oil

  • Red lentil and kabocha squash soup with harissa oil

    • br22 on April 05, 2016

      Make sure you use the cilantro as garnish. The flavor combination is pretty spectacular. I'm going to try it chopped next time so there's both more of it and it in every mouthful! The color of the soup and the suggested oil accompaniment isn't nearly as attractive as the pic in the book but the taste is good. I'll make this whenever I have a kabocha squash.

  • Spaghetti with garlic and oil (Aglio e olio)

    • Njacovina on February 19, 2021

      Great recipe when you have nothing but pantry items. I doubled the garlic, made panko bread crumbs and grated some Parmigiano- Regianno on top. I know it's supposed to be just garlic and oil, but some toasted pine nuts couldn't hurt either.

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Reviews about this book

  • Mercury News (San Jose)

    Both the book and his blog share the same name and the same philosophy, that vegetarian cooking should be a riot of bold, bright flavors and global influences dancing upon the palate - also interview.

    Full review
  • Herbivoracious

    Errata sheet for this book on the author's website. An EYB note has also been made on each affected recipe.

    Full review
  • Kitchn

    His recipes are meatless, yes, but in a way that is persuasive and engaging even to cooks who find it hard to put the meat away. ...the vegetarian book I most want to cook out of this holiday season.

    Full review
  • RecipeGirl

    I love this book because I don’t often think of preparing a vegetarian main dish for my family- but this book smack full of great ideas.

    Full review
  • Knit and Nosh

    Calling it a book of vegetarian food is too limiting. This is a book full of great food, period... I know that it is going to become one of my most favorite go-to cookbooks.

    Full review
  • NPR by T. Susan Chang

    ...if you embrace a certain globe-trotting ethos of meatlessness this is an easy choice...photographs are colorful, the headnotes informative, and the attitude more flavor-forward than right-minded.

    Full review
  • Austin American-Statesman

    Instead of meat substitutes or a preachy subtext, you'll find 150 recipes that are inspired by Natkin's world travels,...meticulous, straightforward directions...guide even less-accomplished cooks.

    Full review
  • examiner.com

    Even in today’s nutrition-concious environment, vegetarianism has a reputation of being "hippie food" that’s not appetizing. Michael Natkin...hopes his new book will change that perception.

    Full review

Reviews about Recipes in this Book

  • ISBN 10 1558327452
  • ISBN 13 9781558327450
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published May 08 2012
  • Format Hardcover
  • Page Count 368
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Harvard Common Press

Publishers Text

Some of the most creative new minds in the kitchen and the most exhilarating new voices in food writing come from the world of blogs. Michael Natkin, creator of the wildly popular Herbivoracious.com, indisputably fits both of those descriptions. In Herbivoracious: A Vegetarian Cookbook for People Who Love to Eat, Natkin offers up 150 exciting recipes (most of which have not appeared on his blog) notable both for their big, bold, bright flavors and for their beautiful looks on the plate, the latter apparent in more than 80 four-color photos that grace the book. This is sophisticated, grown-up meatless cooking, the kind you can serve to company—even when your guests are dedicated meat-eaters.

An indefatigable explorer of global cuisines, with particular interests in the Mediterranean and the Middle East and in East and Southeast Asia, Natkin has crafted, through years of experimenting in his kitchen and in loads of intensive give-and-take with his blog readers, dishes that truly are revelations in taste, texture, aroma, and presentation. A third of the book is taken up with hearty main courses, ranging from a robust Caribbean Lentil-Stuffed Flatbread across the Atlantic to a comforting Sicilian Spaghetti with Pan-Roasted Cauliflower and around the Cape of Good Hope to a delectable Sichuan Dry-Fried Green Beans and Tofu. An abundance of soups, salads, sauces and condiments, sides, appetizers and small plates, desserts, and breakfasts round out the recipes.

Natkin, a vegetarian himself, provides lots of advice on how to craft vegetarian meals that amply deliver protein and other nutrients, and the imaginative menus he presents deliver balanced and complementary flavors, in surprising and utterly pleasing ways. The many dozens of vegan and gluten-free recipes are clearly noted, too, and an introductory chapter lays out the simple steps readers can take to outfit a globally inspired pantry of seasonings and sauces that make meatless food come alive.



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