x

Welcome to Eat Your Books!

If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs.

Become a member and you can create your own personal ‘Bookshelf’. Imagine having a single searchable index of all your recipes – both digital and print!

Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book by Jane Grigson

Search this book for Recipes »

Notes about this book

  • FeastsandFestivals on June 22, 2012

    Jane Grigson can do no wrong as far as I'm concerned, this and the companion fruit book have been my kitchen standbys for years. So much more than just recipe books, inspiring, unpatronising, thorough, thoughtful and a reminder that food is about so much more than just eating.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Asparagus and chicken gratin

    • chriscooks on July 30, 2011

      This is a standby of mine. It does not need the cream.

  • Parmigiana di melanzane

    • tekobo on September 26, 2018

      Very good indeed. More cheesy than auberginey but great.

  • French bean and almond soup

    • wester on September 03, 2010

      A lovely light soup. I made it without the savory and I did not miss it at all.

  • Beans with corn and pumpkin (Porotos granados)

    • chriscooks on July 30, 2011

      This is one of many similar recipes that make a soup/stew of corn, beans, and winter squash. Easy to modify, like by making it more spicy. Good for cool weather.

  • Beetroot and orange salad

    • wester on September 03, 2010

      Not much of a recipe, but this sure is a wonderful combination. These two complement each other perfectly. I always ignore the serving arrangement she suggests though. I think it looks much better when they are mixed together and the beetroot gives some of that lovely color to the oranges.

  • Broad beans and rice

    • Avocet on July 28, 2011

      Very good. Nice as a side dish with grilled salmon and cucumber riata. Amount of butter called for is excessive. Used 2 T and that was quite adequate.

  • Professor Van Mons' Brussels sprouts

    • JLDuck on December 23, 2017

      It may have come from 1818 but it is delicious. I sliced the Brussels and steamed them.

  • Stuffed cabbage in the Trôo style

    • wester on September 03, 2010

      Peasant cooking. Plain, simple, delicious. It does need two hours in the oven.

  • Cabbage kulebiaka

    • Yildiz100 on March 04, 2018

      Uses dried dill, not fresh. Like most of the recipes in this book, this recipe provides an overview of the steps to making the dish but leaves the cook to figure out a lot of the details for themselves, so it isn't very useful if you dont have some cooking experience to rely on. In this case she doesnt specify how to cook the cabbage (temperature, with a lid or without, time) so I cooked it over low heat with a lid until it reached the desired texture. She also gives no recipe for the pastry. I used store bought from Picard and it was just the right size for the filling. I used 4 eggs (she states 4 to 5) and thought the egg really brought the dish together. Next time will use 5. Also reduced the butter quite a bit. It is nicer on the side as the pastry stays crisp. Baking times and temps were just right.

  • Cardoons with anchovies (Cardons aux anchois)

    • wester on November 03, 2014

      The first time I tried cardoons, and well worth repeating. The slightly bitter taste of the cardoons combines well with the umami of the anchovies and the richness of the butter. Maybe the next time add a tiny splash of wine or vinegar.

  • Crécy soup (Potage Crécy)

    • wester on September 03, 2010

      A bit bland. Probably good baby food.

  • Carrot salad with raisins

    • wester on December 10, 2010

      Very basic, but good.

  • Cauliflower in the Polish style (Choufleur à la polonaise)

    • wester on September 03, 2010

      A nice different way of cooking cauliflower, adding some crispness without becoming overly complicated.

  • Danish celery and cheese soup

    • chriscooks on August 01, 2011

      Blue cheese and celery! what more do you need? You can cook it till the celery is mush, or leave it a tad al dente.

  • Celeriac soup

    • wester on September 03, 2010

      A nice sturdy soup. The ceps are a nice touch, but my husband thought there was too much sour cream in it, even though I had already toned it down quite a bit. It also needs more liquid. A ladleful of water plus 300 ml of cream does not really make a pan of soup.

  • Fennel baked with Parmesan cheese (Finocchio alla parmigiana)

    • Tommelise on May 29, 2010

      So simple - so good - this is one of my favorite dishes with fennel

  • Jerusalem artichokes en daube (Adobo de patassoùn)

    • wester on April 26, 2010

      A good vegetable stew. I do wish they had told how long it needs to stew, as that is very long actually - about one hour after the wine has been added.

  • Betty Bolgar's leek and mushroom tart

    • veronicafrance on April 26, 2013

      Easy, cheap, delicious. What more can you ask? I'd happily serve small ones as a substantial first course for a dinner party.

  • Curried parsnip soup

    • veronicafrance on December 26, 2011

      If you must eat parsnips, this is the way to do them -- a much-copied recipe. A really good winter soup. This version is a bit more elaborate and spicier than the one in English Food, which just uses a dash of curry powder.

  • Gratin Dauphinois

    • chriscooks on August 01, 2011

      Works well. Variations -- a generous pinch of thyme in the milk, about 1/2 c each of finely diced ham and finely diced raw onion, romano and breadcrumbs on top, fresh or sauteed or reconstituted dried mushrooms with the potatoes.

  • Gratin aux cèpes

    • veronicafrance on October 04, 2013

      Delicious, rich and creamy. I used fresh ceps -- put in as many as you can afford, but not necessarily the 3/4 kg suggested by Jane, unless you've had a bonanza mushroom hunting session.

  • Potato moussaka

    • mcvl on March 27, 2015

      Nice. Better left over than straight from the oven.

  • Eggs, ham or sole Florentine (Oeufs, jambon ou sole à la florentine)

    • wester on September 30, 2013

      Very simple and basic recipe, but always nice to have around. Most of the ingredients in the list are for the sauce Mornay, and are not really necessary. Just make a cheese sauce according to your favorite recipe. I didn't find any difference in taste between soft-boiled eggs and poached ones, and I found it impossible to shell eggs that are as soft as I want them in this recipe. So, either poach them or have hard-boiled eggs.

You must Create an Account or Sign In to add a note to this book.

Reviews about this book

This book does not currently have any reviews.

  • ISBN 10 0718116755
  • ISBN 13 9780718116750
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Nov 06 1978
  • Format Hardcover
  • Language English
  • Countries United Kingdom
  • Publisher Penguin Books Ltd
  • Imprint Michael Joseph Ltd

Publishers Text

Written with all the author's customary warmth and erudition, here is a modern kitchen guide to the cooking of vegetables, from the well-loved cabbage and parsnip to the more exotic chayote and Chinese leaf.

Other cookbooks by this author