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Fields of Greens: New Vegetarian Recipes from the Celebrated Greens Restaurant by Annie Somerville

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Notes about this book

  • Eat Your Books

    1994 International Association of Culinary Professionals Award Winner

  • Vanessa on May 22, 2011

    I've had this (and the original Greens) for years and didn't use them too much until I got EYB. Since then, I use this frequently. It seems that the ingredients in my refrigerator keep pointing me in this direction! I have always found these two books to be hard to read (literally, difficult to read the typeface). I especially recommend the pastas, risottos, and egg dishes.

  • rathgrith on March 04, 2010

    I've never used this. We are carnivores, but my husband had this for some reason. Maybe I'll actually use it now that I have it in my database!

  • gcottraux on February 01, 2010

    One of my favorite vegetarian restaurants. Always good to have vegetarian recipes that actually use vegetables rather than relying on cheese or other dairy.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Winter greens with pears, walnuts, and warm Roquefort croutons

    • radishseed on October 16, 2012

      This salad is wonderful. Ate it with lentil soup. It's also good if you skip the croutons and just crumble the cheese on top.

  • Mango-papaya salad with citrus-ginger vinaigrette

    • blozoff on August 06, 2018

      Only make if papaya is very ripe. I skipped the orange juice and increased lime juice and Zingerman's vinegar

  • Sicilian salad with roasted eggplant, peppers, and garlic

    • Laura on May 08, 2012

      Pg. 54. With fresh eggplants and watercress from the farmers market, this recipe seemed intriguing. I followed the directions exactly with the exception that I added capers and more kalamata olives than it called for. It took much longer than 15 minutes to blister the red peppers and I thought that the roasting time for the eggplants and garlic was too short as well. I let it marinate on the counter for a couple of hours before serving. We enjoyed it but not so much that I'd go to the trouble of making it again.

  • Spicy corn and chick-pea soup with chilies

    • bloncosky on July 09, 2013

      This is a great soup for the summer corn season. It is really versatile too,you can leave out the hominy and add more fresh corn. You can use your own canned chickpeas and just add 2 cups stock to make up for the bean liquid. A couple hints for omnivorous, you can add a couple pieces of leftover chopped bacon and even substitute chicken for the hominy.

  • Butternut squash soup with apple confit

    • Cheri on January 24, 2010

      Fabulous

  • Mexican lentil soup with roasted garlic and chilies

    • Laura on May 01, 2014

      Pg. 101. This recipe is very labor-intensive, so I was expecting something spectacular. It was good, but it was not so good that it justifies in my mind all of the work and the numerous pots, pans, blenders and grinders. I wouldn't bother to make it again.

    • michalow on December 31, 2012

      Terrific depth of flavor. Roasting and pureeing the garlic and making the chile pastes can seem time consuming, but there's not a great deal of chopping to be done, and this recipe can easily be scaled up and freezes very well. A favorite!

  • Potato soup with pesto

    • Laura on September 03, 2014

      Pg. 102. I made the Light Vegetable Stock recipe (pg. 79) prior to starting the soup, so this was a rather labor-intensive endeavor. I followed the directions to the letter, including using a food mill to puree the cooked potatoes. What I ended up with after milling the potatoes bore a strong resemblance to mashed potatoes and I was fearful that I was on track for a total fail on this recipe. But, after adding 2 more cups of the stock to the potato puree it turned into a thick, but not too thick, soup that had just the right texture and amount of liquid. The diced carrots and potato were a bit too al dente, so I would cook those longer. I also felt that the garlic was too strong, so would cut back on that in future. The pesto (from VCFE, not the recipe in this book) added a nice flavor punch. I'm not convinced the soup was worth all the work -- the result was fine, but nothing special.

    • radishseed on May 02, 2012

      This is a very nice soup. I substituted parsnips for carrots and cooked the onions extra long, till they were more or less caramelized (that was an accident, but it turned out great). I stirred in pesto made from fennel greens at the end, which added a nice herbal flavor.

  • Potato, leek, and celery root soup

    • wester on September 26, 2012

      Not wild about this - a bit bland. I did like the orange crème fraîche though, I might use it in other recipes.

  • Carrot soup with North African spices

    • michalow on September 29, 2018

      This was more subtly spiced than I expected, but it grew on me. Very easy and worth making again. I think I might prefer a sharper citrus than orange juice--will try lime next time.

  • Roman tomato-lentil soup with mint

    • Laura on April 24, 2010

      Pg. 116. This makes a tasty lentil soup, if nothing too exciting. The cook times leave the lentils and vegetables still somewhat crunchy, which we liked; if you prefer less crunch, you'll want to increase the cooking times. I would also increase the amount of mint -- the mint flavor did not come through

  • Tomato-mushroom stock for risotto

    • Laura on September 05, 2012

      Pg. 157. This recipe creates an earthy broth that is darkly reddish-brown in color. Compared with meat-based stocks, this is far less time-consuming, as it simmers for only one hour. It made a great base for the Risotto with Summer Beans, Tomatoes, Peppers, and Basil.

  • Risotto with summer beans, tomatoes, peppers, and basil

    • Laura on September 04, 2012

      Pg. 160. We really liked this dish. We always enjoy a dish when we are able to use a lot of foods from the farmers market: green beans, tomatoes, basil, red pepper, onions. I made the Tomato-Mushroom Stock the day before and I think it is well worth the effort -- it provided a nice earthiness to the dish and, of course, colored it a pale red. I also added the saffron and I think that is a good touch. I waited to add the basil until the dish was done so that the basil flavor would be more prominent. Grated parmigiano-reggiano over the finished dish. I would make this again.

  • Fall risotto with chanterelles and late harvest tomatoes

    • Laura on March 13, 2010

      Pg. 162. Could not resist the sale at my local Whole Foods on Chanterelles ($9.99 /lb!). Consulting EYB, I discovered this recipe and it was quite delicious, although I confess I did not use the tomatoes because they're out-of-season here. Served it with a spinach salad with roasted beets and red onions, ricotta salata cheese and an orange vinaigrette. Edited to add: just had the leftovers for lunch and I believe it's even better today.

    • Cheri on October 15, 2013

      Yumm! We have beautiful wild chanterelles here in the Northwest right now, and this dish shows them off nicely. It's the kind of dish that when you have all the right fresh ingredients it is really superb. I will make this again next fall if the mushrooms are again as plentiful and delicious (and I still have some good tomatoes!) I did reduce quantities, using only 1cup of rice, and 3-3/4 cup broth to meet the qty. of mushrooms that I had. She indicates that the dish will be soupy when finished. I cooked longer and slower to absorb all the liquid, which I would recommend for a more authentic risotto.

  • Winter vegetable curry

    • Laura on December 05, 2010

      Pg. 190. This is very good.

    • radishseed on May 30, 2012

      This curry has a lovely, rich sauce. I would suggest adding a little honey to taste at the end (one or two teaspoons) and some lime juice to highlight the flavors.

  • Gratin of eggplant, roasted peppers, and garlic

    • Vanessa on July 12, 2012

      Awesome. Even though I made it with bottled marinara sauce and used three slightly older (seedy) graffiti eggplants rather than the Japanese eggplants called for me, it was a hit. Husband said "make this any time". Sons (20 and 21, and NOT eggplant fans) both scarfed down their portions too.

  • Warm cannellini beans with sage

    • hyperbowler on October 26, 2016

      The seasonings are great, something I'll make again. However, the bean-cooking technique should be replaced by another recipe--- 35-45 minutes, uncovered, for cannellini beans? Mine took more than two hours, and several replacements of water.

  • Goat cheese, pears and walnuts on toasted sourdough bread

    • radishseed on September 12, 2013

      This is a great, simple tartine. I've made it with fresh pears and with Karen Solomon's Pickled Asian Pears. Both are delicious.

  • Orange-pecan scones

    • radishseed on February 09, 2014

      I used this recipe to make Meyer lemon-hazelnut scones. Nice combination.

  • Oatmeal-raisin scones

    • michalow on May 27, 2013

      Very nice flavor and texture -- tender, buttery, and a little nubby from the oats. A little on the sweet side, especially if using raisins -- I will decrease sugar a bit next time.

  • Ginger-lemon muffins

    • wester on November 21, 2010

      These make your house smell lovely. They taste lightly spicy, not too much. I thought the amount of ginger looked a bit much, so I used one tablespoon less - maybe with the full amount they would get a bit sharp. I made this with yogurt instead of buttermilk. I had to add a bit more to keep the batter thin enough.

  • Cranberry lattice tart

    • michalow on December 03, 2014

      Beautiful and delicious -- excellent value for effort. Added a cinnamon stick and a bit of cardamom to the crans as they simmered. Might try a bit of lemon zest in the pastry next time.

  • Rhubarb-strawberry cobbler

    • michalow on January 01, 2013

      Love the filling and the topping, though biscuit topping does not always cook through, and gummy cobbler is a bummer. Keep dollops of batter small.

    • Laura on May 11, 2010

      Pg. 378. This was very disappointing -- not much flavor at all -- even the orange flavor did not come through.

  • Pickled red onions

    • dkazmercyk on April 17, 2017

      This recipe is quick and easy and the results are fabulous!

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Reviews about Recipes in this Book

  • ISBN 10 0553091395
  • ISBN 13 9780553091397
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Apr 01 1993
  • Format Hardcover
  • Page Count 437
  • Language English
  • Edition 1st
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Bantam Books

Publishers Text

The opening of Greens Restaurant on San Francisco Bay in 1979 changed forever the image of vegetarian cooking in America.  From the restaurant's imaginative mix of casual elegance, exciting tastes, and a subtle message of health and harmony, a distinctive cuisine was born that has continued to bring joy to many thousands of diners every year as well as to the hundreds of thousands of readers who delight in The Greens Cookbook. In its latest incarnation, the restaurant has evolved toward a lighter, leaner, simpler cuisine, one that keeps all the spirit and refinement of the original menu but depends more on the excitement of sparkling fresh produce and its integral relationship to the dishes it inspires.

In close to 300 original recipes, the new Greens style includes exuberant salads, soups, the legendary crusty Greens pizzas, curries and hearty stews, grilled vegetables, and intriguing turnovers made with filo pastry, tortillas, and savory doughs.  And of course there are heavenly breads and the famous desserts, like ginger pound cake with poached apricots and cherries.  This cornucopia of brilliant dishes focuses on tantalizing tastes, with a new simplicity, clarity, and liveliness as its hallmark.

Annie Somerville, the executive chef at Greens, goes right to the heart of the matter: extraordinary produce that's bursting with flavor, color, and texture.  Some of her favorites--like crinkly Bloomsdale spinach, candy-striped Chioggia beets, succulent Rosefir potatoes--are highlighted in the text for gardeners and farmers' market aficionados.  But the Greens style is above all accessible; ordinary red beets will be just fine if more exotic varieties are unavailable.  To help with availability, there's information on locating farmers' markets throughout the country as well as sources for plants, seeds, and local resources.

Because the garden is at the center of this book, readers are encouraged to try their hand, in tiny backyards and windowsill boxes if necessary.  Invaluable growing tips are offered from Green Gulch Farm, the source of much of the stunning produce served at the restaurant.  Other special features include a section on low-fat cooking and another on pairing wine with vegetarian food.

All of the abundance and exuberance that the title Fields of Greens implies is here, for the novice as well as the expert, for simple last-minute meals as well as extravagant occasions.  For truly inspired contemporary vegetarian cooking, Fields of Greens is the essential sourcebook.


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