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Quiches, Kugels, and Couscous: My Search for Jewish Cooking in France by Joan Nathan

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Notes about this book

  • robm on December 20, 2010

    Fascinating look at Jewish cooking in France. French Jewish cooking has become very varied, especially following the large post-war migration to France of Jews from North Africa. Now, specialities from the Maghreb mingle with classic French dishes, all adapted to the rules of kashrut, of course. Nathan traveled all over the country researching this book, so it contains recipes from the varied regions of France. She also writes about the Jewish contributions to French cuisine -- did you know that it was probably the Jews who introduced foie gras to France? Or that cassoulet is probably a variation of the traditional bean pots that Jews prepared for the Sabbath? This is a very welcome addition to the Jewish cookbook shelf!

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  • ISBN 10 0307267598
  • ISBN 13 9780307267597
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Nov 02 2010
  • Format Hardcover
  • Page Count 416
  • Language English
  • Edition 0
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Alfred A. Knopf

Publishers Text

What is Jewish cooking in France? In a journey that was a labor of love, Joan Nathan traveled the country to discover the answer and, along the way, unearthed a treasure trove of recipes and the often moving stories behind them.

Nathan takes us into kitchens in Paris, Alsace, and the Loire Valley; she visits the bustling Belleville market in Little Tunis in Paris; she breaks bread with Jewish families around the observation of the Sabbath and the celebration of special holidays. All across France, she finds that Jewish cooking is more alive than ever: traditional dishes are honored, yet have acquired a certain French finesse. And completing the circle of influences: following Algerian independence, there has been a huge wave of Jewish immigrants from North Africa, whose stuffed brik and couscous, eggplant dishes and tagines--as well as their hot flavors and Sephardic elegance--have infiltrated contemporary French cooking.

All that Joan Nathan has tasted and absorbed is here in this extraordinary book, rich in a history that dates back 2,000 years and alive with the personal stories of Jewish people in France today.



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