x

Welcome to Eat Your Books!

If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs.

Become a member and you can create your own personal ‘Bookshelf’. Imagine having a single searchable index of all your recipes – both digital and print!

Is There a Nutmeg in the House? by Elizabeth David

Search this book for Recipes »

Notes about this book

This book does not currently have any notes.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Sweet-sour cabbage

    • KissTheCook on February 03, 2016

      2.01.16 - sauteed 3-4 oz chopped bacon end piece first with 3/4 head cabbage and one sliced onion. Terrific.

  • Spiced baked carré of lamb

    • veronicafrance on April 20, 2019

      Simple and quick to do. *Do not* obey ED's instructions to bake the rack for 60-70 minutes! Mine was done (i.e. pleasantly pink in the middle) in 25, as advised by the butcher. The spicing is quite subtle, so up the spices if you'd like it a bit more present. Served with a gratin dauphinois and broad beans.

  • Chicken baked with Italian spice and olive oil

    • veronicafrance on August 30, 2012

      Not bad, and simple to do. But you won't get crispy skin with this method. I think if I did it again I'd take the foil off for the last 20 minutes.

You must Create an Account or Sign In to add a note to this book.

Reviews about this book

This book does not currently have any reviews.

  • ISBN 10 1910690201
  • ISBN 13 9781910690208
  • Published Apr 29 2016
  • Format Hardcover
  • Page Count 336
  • Language English
  • Countries United Kingdom
  • Publisher Grub Street

Publishers Text

This anthology of Elizabeth David's work, originally published in hardback in 2000, is a direct sequel to An Omelette and a Glass of Wine. It again contains a selection of her journalistic and occasional work from four decades. Much of it she had chosen herself for reprinting in this more accessible form. In addition there is a considerable amount of unpublished material found in her own files, or contributed by friends to whom she had given recipes, or to whom she had sent letters, either with notes in answer to queries or giving details of current research. None of the material here appears in any of her other nine books. The emphasis throughout is on the practical aspects of cooking and eating, and the book contains over 150 recipes. These stem from many different countries, but they all have Elizabeth David's unmistakable personal touch a Mediterranean tomato consomme or a typically English raspberry ice cream. Little-known articles on her many and varied likes and dislikes complete a unique picture of what for so long made her the most influential cookery writer in the English language. Her work is always immensely readable, elegant and witty, and she has a wonderful ability to share her sense of season and place, her passionate interest in food, its history, its myriad styles and its role in society. There is much here to enjoy both for dedicated Elizabeth David fans and for those who are new to her writing.REVIEWS This posthumous collection of essays reminds us not only what an intelligent writer she was one of the finest ever composers of long sentences but also how sharp in every sense. This book is a taste of lemon after a diet of sugarplums. Bee Wilson - The New Statesman"

Other cookbooks by this author