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French Provincial Cooking by Elizabeth David

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Notes about this book

  • Tiffinbitesized on February 20, 2016

    Also links to 1971 Penguin reprint ISBN 00140460993

  • featherbooks on April 18, 2013

    Notable Recipes per 101 Classic Cookbooks (2012): Cassoulet de Toulouse, Chocolate Cake, La Bouillabaisse, p.351, Poulet a l'Estragon, p.504, Quiche Lorraine, Tarte a l'Oignon, or Zewelwai, p. 416, Terrine de Campagne, p. 560.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Potage bonne femme

    • jodies on January 30, 2014

      Excellent! My favorite potato leek soup recipe.

  • Tunnyfish omelette (Omelette au thon)

    • wester on June 07, 2011

      Simple and good, even though the technique is a bit elaborate. The herbed butter is a nice finishing touch.

  • Sausages with sweet peppers and wine (Saucisses à la Navarraise)

    • veronicafrance on March 23, 2012

      Good score on the effort versus results scale -- tastes nice and is very easy to do, especially if you have a jar of Navarran piquillo peppers to hand -- less than half an hour. I used merguez instead of chorizo and upped the amount of red peppers -- I used 3 out of the jar (piquillos are small). A glug of Pedro Ximenez sherry in the sauce was not unwelcome.

  • Carrots with cream sauce (Carottes à la crème)

    • emiliang on July 31, 2013

      A great side-dish, loved by everyone in the family. Easy to make, too.

  • Chanterelles with parsley butter (Chanterelles maître d'hôtel)

    • wester on October 15, 2011

      Very basic, and very good. Great with an omelet and a salad.

  • Endives stewed in butter 1 (Endives au beurre 1)

    • KissTheCook on August 13, 2015

      Leeks also excellent prepared the same way.

  • Provençal meat and wine stew (La daube de boeuf Provençale)

    • chriscooks on August 01, 2011

      Good any time but particularly in the winter. It is worth doing the layering and cutting the way she describes. I have never flamed the wine and I often cook it slowly on top of the stove (electric burners).

    • tui on February 11, 2013

      A beautiful recipe. So easy and so delicious. I don't flame the wine either.

    • KissTheCook on July 30, 2016

      This must be the recipe E.D.'s friend Jill Norman says "unimprovable... works for everybody and is so good". Quote from Rachel Cooke, The Guardian, 12/07/13

  • Pork noisettes with prunes and cream sauce (Noisettes de porc au pruneaux)

    • adrienneyoung on September 20, 2013

      Stupendous. Gorgeous. Hideously bad for you. You won't much care.

    • Foodycat on July 09, 2014

      Very rich, but such a classic. Use good pork - cheap pork makes it woolly and not as good.

    • MmeFleiss on August 18, 2017

      So simple but so good.

  • Chicken with cream and cheese sauce (Émincés de volaille au gratin)

    • veronicafrance on December 26, 2011

      I absolutely love this recipe; it's one of my favourites for using up cooked chicken, guinea fowl, or turkey. Do follow ED's directions for the sauce even if they seem unnecessarily fiddly -- they make all the difference.

  • Peaches in white wine (Pèches au vin blanc)

    • wester on July 31, 2011

      This one is more of a real dessert than her version in Italian cooking. Very good either way.

  • Apricot ice (Glace à l'abricot)

    • Foodycat on August 16, 2014

      Very sparse instructions - you already need to know how to make a custard. It doesn't need an ice cream machine, but freezes quite hard so you need to take it out of the freezer about 10 minutes before serving to make it scoopable. I would have preferred a stronger apricot flavour: if I make it again I will add half a dozen dried apricot halves to the fresh ones when I cook them.

  • Peach jam 1 (Marmelade de pêches 1)

    • KissTheCook on November 07, 2016

      p. 458 - Agree wholeheartedly with emiliang's note. Gauge sugar on peaches. I used 1/3 recipe amount and still on the sweet side.

    • emiliang on July 22, 2013

      This softly set preserve is just about the simplest approach to capturing the flavors of summer. 18 peaches yielded 5 jars of preserves. No lemon juice and no pectin -- just ripe peaches and sugar. Heavenly on fresh bread, croissants, or cheesecake.

  • Morue à la Provençale

    • veronicafrance on June 21, 2013

      This wasn't bad at all, a bit different from the usual ways of cooking bacalao/salt cod. No quantities are given, but you need quite a lot of onions and shallots to thoroughly cover the fish. It has a tendency to be a bit dry, but this could be solved by serving it with a tomato side dish -- baked or stewed in olive oil for example. Don't over-soak the cod; it still needs to taste a bit salty. Also -- forgot to mention the most important thing -- the recipe suggests you bake the cooked salt cod for an hour. Far too long. I baked the onion mixture for about 20 minutes, covered in foil, then added lightly poached cod and breadcrumbs and baked for a further 20 minutes uncovered.

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  • ISBN 10 0140467831
  • ISBN 13 9780140467833
  • Published Oct 30 1986
  • Format Paperback
  • Page Count 528
  • Language English
  • Edition New edition
  • Countries United Kingdom
  • Publisher Penguin Books Ltd
  • Imprint Penguin Books Ltd


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