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Bistro Cooking by Patricia Wells

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Notes about this book

  • Eat Your Books

    1990 International Association of Culinary Professionals Award Winner

  • Eat Your Books

    1990 International Association of Culinary Professionals Award Winner

  • Eat Your Books

    1990 International Association of Culinary Professionals Award Winner

  • chawkins on June 13, 2013

    Notable recipes per 101 Classic Cookbook: choux rouges braises, daube de boeuf Auberge de la Madone aux cèpes et à l'orange, Gratin Dauphinois Madame Cartet, Gratin Dauphinois Madame Laracine, moules à la Provençale, gigot rôti au gratin de Monsieur Henny, poulet au vinaigre Le Petit Truc, potage aux lentilles avec saucisses de porc, roasted tomatoes Provençales, tarte au citron.

  • abbyhurlbu on January 01, 2010

    I have loved this simple french cook book for years! Deceptively simple but always yummy

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Seasoned couscous salad

    • leswhaley on September 04, 2011

      Make sure vegetable mix is drained and as dry as possible before adding to couscous. Too much extra liquid will make the couscous sticky.

  • Herbed split pea soup

    • djoh437938 on April 16, 2010

      love this soup, as good if not better than my own.

    • Laura on October 11, 2013

      Pg. 26. One of my most favorite recipes was one for split pea soup that I got from my Mom. Because it required a ham bone and I rarely cooked ham (except for holidays), it was a rare treat. This recipe solves the problem of the ham bone by using cubed cooked ham. It's really delicious and even better the second day. I let the soup cook down to the point where the peas lose all form and this creates a smooth soup without having to use a food mill. It also serves to concentrate the flavors more intensely. I try to make this several times every winter.

    • DJM on February 13, 2014

      Simple additions of herbs elevate this recipe to better-than-most split pea soups. It's now the favorite recipe for split pea soup.

    • Rinshin on December 07, 2014

      Fresh tasting split pea soup that showcases subtle herbs taste. I used ham bone from the mini carver ham from Snake River Farms and did not use the ham only. There was enough ham still attached to the bone. I also used homemade pork stock I had on hand and did not use the chicken stock. The best tasting split pea soup I've ever tasted.

    • chawkins on February 24, 2015

      This is just as good as my normal split pea soup recipe from the Culinary Institute of America but much, much easier. No need to dice and sweat the vegetables, you just put everything in a pot and cook for couple of hours. I did use a stick blender to puree it for a little bit before serving.

  • Leek and potato soup

    • westminstr on December 07, 2015

      This soup is an old favorite that I hadn't made in a few years. I wanted to see if it held up, and it did. This soup only has a few ingredients. It is very easy to make, and it is also very good. I love recipes like this!

  • Chick-pea salad from the Auberge D'Aillane

    • Laura on June 28, 2010

      Pg. 39. This is delicious! I highly recommend cooking the beans yourself rather than using canned beans.

  • Chez tante Paulette's salad with garlic

    • shelftotable on July 22, 2015

      This was a very nice, well balanced salad. With bread and wine a great summer supper. Blogged here https://shelftotable.wordpress.com/2015/07/22/bistro-cooking-garlic-salad/

  • Escarole, ham, cheese, and walnut salad

    • westminstr on November 28, 2015

      I thought this salad was really delicious. I served it as a main dish salad and so I included the prosciutto, and it was very tasty too. But you could easily leave it out - just the dressing with cheese and walnuts would be great too.

  • La Mère Besson's mixed summer salad

    • sturlington on March 26, 2013

      A variation on the ever-popular "breakfast" or Lyonnaise salad. This has tomatoes, which is why it's a summer salad. I'm sure you could add bacon if you liked. p55

  • Green lentil salad

    • bching on January 03, 2014

      Needs something crunchy or crisp for textural contrast.

    • Melanie on June 14, 2015

      This salad is delicious. Very easy to make, simple flavours, but not too plain.

  • Tante Yvonne's tossed green salad with vinaigrette

    • wester on July 02, 2017

      A green salad with vinaigrette. Good, but very basic.

  • L'oulette's salad of ham, walnuts, and duck gizzards

    • wester on July 04, 2017

      Simple but good. I used cooked chicken stomachs instead of the duck gizzards. I also added some celery leaves to the greens, which was very good.

  • Layered vegetable gratin

    • sturlington on March 26, 2013

      Easy, summery, absolutely delicious. I added some Parmesan and broiled during the last 5 minutes to put a little "gratin" in my gratin. This also tastes good as a cold salad the next day. p84.

    • twoyolks on October 17, 2013

      The flavors of the vegetables never really melded together well.

  • Félix Benoît's onion gratin

    • wester on July 03, 2017

      I think this could be great with a few tweaks. As written, the onion still had too much bite and there was not enough sauce. More cream and longer baking (at lower temperature) next time.

  • Provençal roast tomatoes

    • leswhaley on September 04, 2011

      Did not care for this version of the dish. It was too soupy and watery. Other recipes for Roast Tomatoes Provencal that call for removing excess liquid and seeds from tomatoes first may yield better results.

  • Maggie's roasted red peppers

    • leswhaley on September 09, 2011

      Use serrano or jalapeno peppers only. Do not use red pepper flakes.

  • Madame Cartet's potato gratin

    • Cheri on November 12, 2010

      Added slices/chunks of ham, sprinkled parmesan on top. Excellent comfort food. Takes a full hour to bake, plus should set a few minutes before serving.

    • hughb on June 19, 2012

      Have made several times, always to acclaim.

    • chawkins on May 13, 2013

      Very good. After rubbing the dish with the garlic, I chopped it up and sprinkled it on top of the potato layers with some black pepper. I sprinkled salt over the first layer, but forgot to do so for the second layer, but it did not turn out bland, I guess the cheese provided ample salt. I also used evaporated milk instead of cream or creme fraiche because I have it sitting in the fridge leftover from some other recipe. After the full assembly I also added a glug of 2% milk because my Gruyere was a little old and and somewhat dry.

    • Rdaihl on April 05, 2014

      I add two cloves of chopped garlic and sprinkle it in with potatoes. My family loves this recipe!

  • Madame Laracine's potato gratin

    • Laura on November 10, 2010

      Pg. 99. This is the first recipe I've made from this book and it's a winner. This is really, really good! And quite easy. It did not take a full hour to cook, closer to 45-50 minutes. Happily, there are leftovers for tomorrow!

    • twoyolks on May 07, 2013

      This recipe is lighter than some gratin recipes because there is less cream in it.

    • chawkins on July 09, 2015

      This is so good. I tasted the potato slices as I was assembling the gratin, they tasted great without the addition of the cheese, nutmeg, pepper and cream. By cooking the potato in the milk/water mixture with salt, minced garlic and bay leaves, they became very flavorful on their own. I made half a recipe in a 9 x 7 x 2 gratin dish, used Jarlsberg cheese because I have a big chunk that needs to be used and baked for 45 minutes.

  • Boiled new potatoes with a gratin of munster

    • twoyolks on September 30, 2016

      This was strange and not in a good way. It was basically melted cheese on top of boiled potatoes with cumin seeds. It just didn't taste very good.

  • L'Ami Louis's potato cake

    • twoyolks on October 10, 2016

      This was pretty rich simply from the poultry fat (I used schmaltz). I had pretty thinly sliced potatoes so they took less time to brown. They also tended to stick to the pan but using a thin spatula to turn them helped a lot. They did end up cooking into a single potato cake. The garlic sprinkled on top really adds something nice.

  • Lyonnaise potato galette

    • chawkins on June 17, 2015

      Potatoes, onions and butter, what's not to like. It was good, but not as good as the version I used to get at the Blue Bell Inn in Blue Bell, Pa. years ago, I'm sure their version used a lot more butter as it was much crispier. I used Yukon gold potatoes, steamed them and smashed them in the pan with the onions.

    • saladdays on November 13, 2016

      Highly recommended for anyone needing comfort food. Easy to make, a bit heavy on butter if you're into healthy eating but the amount can be cut down. Not quite so tasty but still acceptable.

  • Leek tart

    • RosieB on June 28, 2016

      I had some pastry made which I had frozen and wanted to use it. This tart was easy and delicious. I used local ham off the bone and parmgiano cheese. A great mid week dinner with a simple grren salad.

  • Savory swiss chard tart

    • twoyolks on June 16, 2015

      This forms a very thing layer of tart filling over a very thin crust. It's almost pizza-like. The flavor was good but the Swiss chard was a bit too earthy. Dipping it in aioli worked very well.

  • Grilled tuna with herbed tomato, garlic, oil, and lemon sauce

    • twoyolks on August 03, 2014

      The tomato sauce is similar to a fresh tomato salsa. The acidity in the tomatoes really complements the richness of the tuna very well.

    • westminstr on September 11, 2014

      I modified the sauce to use up my cherry tomatoes, and I cut the olive oil, lemon juice and garlic in half. I thought it was quite good and went well with the tuna and a side of farro.

  • Willi's wine bar's grilled porgy with red peppers, capers, and cumin

    • westminstr on November 10, 2015

      From LLM: I love this recipe. it is my favorite from the book. However, I do make some changes. I just use fillets instead of whole fish. I lightly flour them then pan fry. I also sub butter for the olive oil in the sauce - butter, capers, cumin seeds (I leave out the red peppers). I made it as written (except with fillets) the first time, and have gradually adjusted it to my tastes, but that mixture of capers and cumin seeds is really fantastic. You just pour the sauce onto the pan-fried fish. Lovely.

  • Turbot in cider vinegar sauce

    • Laura on July 27, 2014

      Pg. 149. We were not crazy about the cider vinegar butter sauce -- it didn't really add that much to the fish and considering how much butter went into a very small quantity of sauce, it was ridiculous. The method for cooking the fish was very nice -- really simple and quick. I'd be happy to cook turbot or any other flat fish like this again -- but I'd find a tastier and less caloric sauce to serve with it.

  • Chicken with hot peppers, ham, tomatoes, and onions

    • aberne on September 28, 2011

      nice, though the peppers cook down to practically nothing, so the sauce is soupy, though delicious. I would almost think of adding some peppers a bit later to keep their texture.

  • Bistro d'à côté's chicken in wine vinegar

    • westminstr on November 28, 2015

      I expected to love this but it was only ok for me. The vinegar was a bit too dominant/astringent for my taste. Not sure if a better vinegar would have improved it, and I also didn't reduce it enough. I also used blsl thighs but would have preferred a whole cut-up chicken.

    • wester on July 03, 2017

      A nice change from the usual chicken recipes; something to make occasionally.

  • La Camargue's beef stew with black olives

    • westminstr on March 03, 2016

      i would not bother to make this again.

  • Pear pound cake

    • mirage on June 26, 2010

      Very thin.

  • Café du Jura's raspberry tart

    • twoyolks on July 25, 2014

      The custard never setup for me, even after baking longer than specified. The flavor was fine but I think I'd prefer a pastry cream.

  • Sweet swiss chard torte

    • amoule on April 05, 2015

      I absolutely loved this and most of my guests did too, but some did not. It's not really a dessert, it's more of an afternoon snack for teatime. I think if I hadn't tried to serve it for dessert everyone would have loved it.

  • Warm potato salad with herbed vinaigrette

    • twoyolks on September 09, 2014

      The dressing for the potato salad is very similar to a classic French vinaigrette.

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Reviews about this book

  • Running With Tweezers

    This...is ALL substance and no style. No matter, though. Some of my favorite comfort dishes come from this book – nothing like sausages and potatoes cooked in fat to take the edge off on a cold day.

    Full review

Reviews about Recipes in this Book

  • Pied de Cochon's onion soup

    • Running With Tweezers

      It's quite good – but also quite different from most versions of French onion soup that I’ve had. It's much lighter – none of that heavy, beefy, salty taste. Do I mind doing without it? Not at all.

      Full review
  • Le Procope's pasta with lemon, ham, and black olives

    • Tea & Cookies

      ...the main dish was heaven itself. Thin strips of salty prosciutto danced with the tang of lemon zest....It was moist and pungent and full of unexpected textures and tastes. It was divine.

      Full review
  • ISBN 10 0894806238
  • ISBN 13 9780894806230
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Jan 01 1989
  • Format Paperback
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Workman Publishing
  • Imprint Workman Publishing

Publishers Text

IACP and Beard Award! Chosen Cookbook of the Year (1989) by USA Today and selected as an Editor's Choice for the year's top books by Publishers Weekly, Patricia Wells's Bistro Cooking celebrates the return to warm, generous cuisine. Here are over 200 recipes inspired by the neighborhood restaurants of France--adapted and tested for the American table. 2-color photos and illustrations throughout

Other cookbooks by this author