x

Welcome to Eat Your Books!

If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs.

Become a member and you can create your own personal ‘Bookshelf’. Imagine having a single searchable index of all your recipes – both digital and print!

The New Basics Cookbook by Julee Rosso and Sheila Lukins

Search this book for Recipes »

Notes about this book

  • Eat Your Books

    See Lisa Is Cooking's take on Basic pizza dough from this book.

  • Eat Your Books

    See Lisa Is Cooking's take on Basic pizza dough from this book.

  • Foodelf on May 27, 2012

    The New Basics Cookbook. Although I no longer have this book (loaned and never returned), I've been making the Split Pea and Ham Soup for at least a couple decades. It's the best and can be dressed up (add a splash of sherry) or simply a flavour-filled soup on a chilly winter evening. Don't skip adding the spinach just before serving. The soup freezes beautifully.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Spiced party nuts

    • WendyKinney on January 03, 2012

      This was really ho-hum. Not worth the effort. Much better options.

  • Berta's chopped liver

    • ellabee on July 08, 2013

      p.10. Cook the onions a bit more -- 25-30 minutes rather than 20. Added a splash each of cream and cognac when buzzing with immersion blender. Used as basis for calves liver pate summer 2013; also excellent.

  • Guacamole is hot!

    • chawkins on May 16, 2014

      Very good guacamole, interesting that lemon juice is used rather than lime, but then the chicken fajitas that this goes with has tons of lime juice in it.

  • Black bean pesto

    • chawkins on May 16, 2014

      Very good, the house was filled with the wonderful aroma of jalapenos and cilantro. I made this as part of the chicken fajitas recipe.

  • Clark Wolf's bruschetta

    • hillsboroks on September 19, 2015

      This is the recipe that I wait all summer for vine ripe tomatoes to make. I have had guests say that they could just eat the whole bowl of this bruschetta topping for dinner and be happy. The quality of the tomatoes makes all the difference here so try to use garden ripe tomatoes and heirloom tomatoes from the farmers market to make this dish magic.

  • Alice Waters' bruschetta

    • SandJ on August 30, 2014

      Delicious and simple.

  • Tomato lentil soup

    • jlockwood0 on January 10, 2010

      very yummy. made some changes - noted in cookbook

  • Baked winter squash soup

    • Lee on October 26, 2014

      I didn't have mace on hand and substituted garam masala - nice.

  • Split pea and ham soup

    • Cheri on June 01, 2011

      This is good, tarragon adds nice variety to flavor. I would make this again.

  • Pasta dough

  • Broccoli and garlic penne

  • Molly's vinaigrette

  • Red cabbage braised with vinegar and bacon

    • kith51 on April 10, 2014

      The three tablespoons of brown sugar was _way_ too much; I cut it down to about a tablespoon and still thought the dish was too sweet (but my household disagreed). And I don't use the raisins.

  • Creamy fresh corn

    • Bloominanglophile on September 15, 2013

      My notes from 2006 say that this recipe is "good, easy". I did underline the word "fresh" in reference to the corn. Any age to the corn that results in tough kernels will also result in a less than satisfactory dish.

  • Sesame snow peas

  • Scalloped ham and potatoes

    • vhague on February 03, 2016

      This is a decent, basic recipe but it needs a little more flavor. Next time I make it, I will likely increase the amount of salt and utilize garlic powder in lieu of simmering garlic slivers in the heavy cream. The faint taste of garlic was nice, but was somewhat overpowered by the ham.

  • Spaghetti squash cassserole

    • Laurendmck on October 05, 2014

      p. 290. This is a microwave recipe.

  • Basil barley Provençal

    • Laura on May 16, 2010

      Pg. 309. This was really good. I would not make any changes.

  • Full of beans soup

    • Laura on March 13, 2010

      Pg. 322. Had some wonderful all-natural kielbasa from my local purveyor at the farmers market, so decided to make this soup. Used flageolets, kidney beans, garbanzos, and black beans. Made some changes: significantly increased the spices as the amounts seemed way too low; used cilantro instead of parsley, as I think it pairs better with chili powder and cumin. The soup turned out very spicy, which we like. Served it with grated pecorino romano, chopped cilantro, sour cream.

    • ctweebee on November 02, 2013

      I love chili and soup and this recipe is the perfect combination. But I don't like ham hocks or kielbasa so in I increase the beans (1 cup white, 2/3 cup red, 2/3 cup blackeyed peas, 1/3 black beans, 1/3 mixed yellow and green split peas) and after soaking overnight and rinsing, simmer them with a pound of sliced bacon (naturally smoked) in 12 cups of water, lid off, for 2 hours, then remove bacon (reserve for other use or throw away), add a little water if too thick, then 28 oz. Marzano tomatoes blended 1/2 a minute with handblender added to the beans with chopped onion, 1 heaping tablespoon of chili powder, 2 tsps. ground cumin, red pepper flakes to taste, and, instead of lemon, 4 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar, 1/2 cup chopped parsley and 1/4 tsp. of salt. Simmer for another hour, stirring frequently, until is thick as you like. For a hardy nutritious meal add shredded poached chicken, diced avocado and shredded cheddar cheese, etc.

  • Penelope Wisner's white beans with star anise and chicken

    • peachy on November 24, 2013

      A wonderful chicken dish for cold weather dining.

  • Black and white bean salad

  • Tartar sauce

    • Lindalib on November 10, 2012

      Excellent basic recipe!

  • Ellen's fried chicken

    • Cheri on June 01, 2011

      This is a really great fried chicken recipe. My basic go-to when I get this craving.

  • Chicken breasts Positano

    • Breadcrumbs on June 10, 2010

      p. 408 - cornmeal crusted flattened chx breasts w a chiffonade of arugula tossed in a pressed tomato and lemon dressing

  • Moroccan chicken

    • peachy on November 24, 2013

      I've been making this recipe for over 20 years and it never fails to please. My husband loves it.

  • Bourbon turkey

    • hillsboroks on June 20, 2016

      This is one of our all-time favorite grilling recipes. We have never made this with a whole turkey but have used turkey parts instead. We especially love it with either turkey legs or turkey thighs. For 2 legs or thighs I just make 1/4 of the marinade and 1/4 of the glaze. I penciled in the 1/4 version of the recipe in my cookbook years ago. We try to leave the turkey in the marinade at least 8 hours, turning it over once or twice. The resulting turkey meat is savory, moist and a bit reddish on the inside from the red wine in the marinade and the glaze gives it a lovely mahogany coating on the outside. There is always a bit of glaze left over and next time we will hold out part of the glaze as a dipping sauce after maybe reducing it a bit to make it more syrupy. The thighs and legs take about 40-45 minutes on the charcoal grill over indirect heat . We turn them every 20 min. and remove them to rest when the instant read thermometer reads 165 F.

  • Smoked salmon and leek frittata

  • Buttermilk waffles

    • Alowishs on March 31, 2016

      Used a maple/butter syrup inspired by the orange butter recipe next to this one in the book. A big fat yummo! I also added some orange zest to the dry ingredients of waffle recipe and that added great flavor as well.

  • New Basic chicken fajitas

    • chawkins on May 16, 2014

      Kind of involved if you make the black bean pesto and guacamole that goes with it, but well worth the effort. I only used half of the called for oil to cook the onions and it turned out well. I did not char-grilled the chicken breasts, I gas-grilled them. The bean pesto is a good idea, if you spread it on the tortilla before piling on all the fillings, the tortilla won't fall apart no matter how much you overstuff it.

  • Bill's planked salmon

  • Grand gaucho paella

    • BelleB. on September 14, 2014

      Use Spanish chorizo instead of the Italian sausage and add lots of saffron!

  • Sliced sirloin with shallot wine sauce

    • unrealmeal on March 13, 2011

      1. Make sure that the fat in the pan is good and hot and sizzling before adding meat or it won't brown. 2. Don't go just by suggested cooking time -- use a meat thermometer to judge internal temperature. Also, keep in mind that meat will continue to cook a little after removed from heat. 3. 2# of meat for four people is 1/2 lb of meat each, which can be a lot for some people. A 1# steak fed three nicely in my house. If you're trying to eat more healthily or watch calories or whatever, cut back on the amount of protein here and supplement with some extra veg on the side.

  • Corned beef and cabbage

    • Laura on March 13, 2010

      Pg. 497. I've been making this for St. Patrick's Day every year since the cookbook was published. Has it really been 20 years?! It's super simple and very tasty. I suggest making way more than you think you'll need -- people eat a lot of it and it's great as a leftover. Serve with Irish beers - Harp is a favorite at our house.

  • Italian stuffed flank steak

    • Cheri on June 02, 2011

      This is Excellent. Good cold or warm. Spirals are pretty (red/green/white).

  • Vegetable chili

    • stockholm28 on February 21, 2014

      This is my go to chili recipe. I've been making it a couple times a year for 20+ years. I think it is as good as any chili with meat. I reduce the olive oil by half.

    • lizard on February 09, 2017

      Just made this last night. Really fantastic. Like stockholm28 I used half the oil.

  • Confetti corned beef hash

    • chawkins on March 18, 2014

      It was a good hash, both in taste and in appearance. The addition of thyme is different but in a good way. You're supposed to put a plate on top of the hash and weighed it down with something, while cooking. I could not think of anything I could put on top of the plate to weigh it down and covered the pan at the same time, so I skipped that process, I also sub dried parsley for fresh as I just got back from the store and I forgot to buy some.

    • hillsboroks on March 22, 2014

      This is a very good corned beef hash recipe. I hadn't made corned beef hash before and just had to try it after seeing all the notes and comments about various hash recipes. The thyme really adds a lovely flavor note and the peppers add color as well as flavor. I also used Yukon Gold potatoes. I used a heavy oven proof plate to weigh the hash down in the pan and didn't worry about another lid. I took a tip from David Leite's hash recipe and near the end of the cooking time made four holes in the hash in the pan and cracked four eggs into the holes. Then I covered it for about 4 minutes to let the eggs cook and served it at once. My husband, who has always said he didn't like hash because his mother made it dry and salty when he was a kid, absolutely loved this version and said he would eat it again any time.

  • Lemon and ginger pork loin

    • Cheri on June 02, 2011

      I have made this many times with good success. Generally very well liked by different taste palates. Lemon marmalade is tough for me to find, so I always stock up when I find it, just for this dish!

    • quinns on November 27, 2012

      I agree with Cheri, lemon marmalade is very tough to find. But Rose's Lime Marmalade is very easy to find and it substitutes well.

  • Pork chops and scalloped potato casserole

    • hjm on October 13, 2012

      After making this recipe twenty years ago for the first time, it has become my standard scalloped potato recipe (minus the pork chops). The meaty version is delicious, but time-consuming. Potato scallop made this way never fails to earn praise. It seems to call for a lot of mustard, but you can safely use the full amount as it mellows deliciously during baking. I have used many mustards but I always try to use one that is sweet and one that is rough--usually a honey mustard and a coarse Dijon. I now skip the par-boiling step for the potatoes, but I make sure to cook the dish the full recommended time. Al dente scalloped potatoes are not what you want!

    • chawkins on April 13, 2015

      Made this based on the star rating. As my husband said, what's not to like with pork, potatoes, onions and mustard. Even though it is supposed to be one-pot meal, the preparation is not all that simple, you do have a few pots to clean. First you have to reduce the cream with the garlic slices steeping in it, then you have to blanch the sliced potatoes and dry them and brown the pork chops before assembly. I halved the potatoes but only made two pork chops instead of six. I put everything in a 9x5 loaf pan and baked for only half of the time call for and everything was done. I also did not have enough cream and augmented with 2% milk.

  • Ginger ale pork chops

    • unrealmeal on March 27, 2011

      This is a really not-terribly-gingery dish, which was a little disappointing.

  • Carnival feijoada

    • Breadcrumbs on March 14, 2010

      March 2010 - Haven't made this....put off by rec when looking in book. Calls for 1/2 lb slab of bacon and 1lb sausages to be cooked (whole) in pot w other ingredients. Once cooked, the liquid is separated out and refrigerated overnight so fat (which I'm imagining will be plentiful!) can be removed. Remaining liquid is then heated and served over rice with cut up meats and beans. Sounds like too drawn out a process for the results I'm imagining. I'll let someone else try this one and let me know if I've got it wrong.

  • Asian baby back ribs

    • Laura on January 24, 2011

      Pg. 553. This dish had good flavor, but the cooking instructions really need to be revised. At an oven temperature of 400 degrees, the sugary marinade began to burn well before the halfway point. I had to lower the heat significantly and pull the meat out well before the stated time of 1-1/4 hours. Fortunately, the meat was cooked adequately at that time. Unfortunately, I don't think I can salvage the pan that I cooked it in -- there is a thick layer of burned marinade that I doubt I can remove. I won't be making this again, but if I did, I'd significantly lower the oven temperature, cook longer, and not baste until the very end.

  • Herb-crusted lamb with roast potatoes

    • Bloominanglophile on September 15, 2013

      Looking at a recipe you made notes on can definitely take you back. I made this in 1998 while we were living in Iceland (lamb aplenty there!) for a new family that we were sponsoring. My first experience cooking lamb, and for Easter, and it turned out quite well for this novice cook!

  • Minestrone

    • Laura on August 15, 2010

      Pg. 583. I usually think of minestrone as a cold-weather dish. However, I had a lot of vegetables from the farmers market to use up and this recipe came up -- along with the fact that it's been a rainy, rather cool day here in Maryland. Anyway, it was pretty tasty, if not exceptional. I'd make it again, although I'm still on the search for a great minestrone recipe. Maybe it will be better tomorrow after the flavors have had a chance to deepen.

  • Schiacciata con l'uva (Tuscan grape bread)

    • dondell on September 13, 2013

      hard to kneed in all the raisins. irish soda bread texture - and dense. good with sweet grape topping. used biter mini grapes with seeds, after backing he seeds dissolved and grapes were sweet.

  • Pheasant pot pie

    • ellabee on December 28, 2013

      Didn't make this exact dish, but used guidance on rolling and cutting puff pastry tops for chicken pot pies in 16-oz ramekins. For next time, if using frozen store-bought puff pastry: overnight fridge thaw preferable to counter, because sheet stays at the ideal rolling stage, flexible yet chilled, while the various components get prepared. With my slowpoke style, it's hard to time it just right for the 40 minutes thawing at room-temp.

  • Hot and sassy cornbread

    • Laura on November 06, 2010

      Pg. 626. It took a long time for the center to cook. Also, while it tasted good, the texture was gritty. I doubt that I would make this again.

  • Raspberry angel food cake with raspberry Amaretto sauce

    • Deborah on February 01, 2010

      This is a super easy and very impressive dessert; you can use an angel-food cake mix instead of making a scratch cake (esp. if you're low on eggs) and it comes out just as well. The raspberry amaretto sauce is to die for; make extra and serve it on ice cream when the cake's all gone...which will be instantaneous!

  • Rhubarb strawberry sauce

    • canderson on May 12, 2012

      Totally delicious, and it could not be easier! Perfect for ice cream, desserts, and pancakes too. I like it for breakfast over fresh yogurt with a little granola. Delicious!

    • lorloff on June 16, 2013

      Great really delicious

  • Sunny lemon sherbert

    • groovyspoon on December 22, 2015

      Never Fails; I have been making this for over a decade in a Donvier. substituting limes is just as good

  • Chunky applesauce

    • MsB on March 28, 2011

      This is my go to applesauce. It is quick, easy and most importantly my boys love it.

You must Create an Account or Sign In to add a note to this book.

Reviews about this book

This book does not currently have any reviews.

  • ISBN 10 0894803417
  • ISBN 13 9780894803413
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Jan 10 1989
  • Format Paperback
  • Page Count 849
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Workman Publishing

Publishers Text

It's the 1.8-million-copy bestselling cookbook that's become a modern-day classic. Beginning cooks will learn how to boil an egg. Experienced cooks will discover new ingredients and inspired approaches to familiar ones. Encyclopedic in scope, rich with recipes and techniques, and just plain fascinating to read, The New Basics Cookbook is the indispensable kitchen reference for all home cooks.

This is a basic cookbook that reflects today's kitchen, today's pantry, today's taste expectations. A whimsically illustrated 875-recipe labor of love, The New Basics features a light, fresh, vibrantly flavored style of American cooking that incorporates the best of new ingredients and cuisines from around the world.

Over 30 chapters include Fresh Beginnings; Pasta, Pizza, and Risotto; Soups; Salads; every kind of Vegetable; Seafood; The Chicken and the Egg; Grilling from Ribs to Surprise Paella; Grains; Beef; Lamb, Pork; Game; The Cheese Course, and Not Your Mother's Meatloaf. Not to mention 150 Desserts! Plus, tips, lore, menu ideas, at-a-glance charts, trade secrets, The Wine Dictionary, a Glossary of Cooking Terms, The Panic-Proof Kitchen, and much more.



Other cookbooks by this author