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The Silver Palate Cookbook by Julee Rosso and Sheila Lukins

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Notes about this book

  • featherbooks on April 19, 2013

    Notable Recipes according to 101 Classic Cookbooks (2012): Chicken Marbella, p. 501, Chili for a Crowd, Curried Butternut Squash Soup, p. 348, Decadent Chocolate Cake, Pasta Puttanesca, p. 444, Roast Lamb with Peppercorn Crust, Salmon Mousse, p. 322, Six Onion Soup, Tarragon Chicken Salad, p. 369, Tomato, Montrachet and Basil Salad.

  • nomadchowwoman on January 17, 2010

    With this book, published just as I was teaching myself to cook, I became obsessed. I learned to care about ingredients, appreciate olive oils, vinegars, fresh herbs. I've probably made more recipes from The Silver Palate than any other in my collection.

  • crjoburke on December 26, 2009

    Historic and authentic Italian recipes. Every Italian bride receives this book

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Phyllo triangles: spinach-feta

    • kkillebrew on January 01, 2015

      Lynne made these for New Year's Eve 2014. Yum!

  • Tapenade dip

    • CorgiMom on January 14, 2013

      This recipe is easy as can be and makes a tapenade which blows the socks off what you can buy commercially. I usually skip the tuna and add a couple more anchovies, and skip the mayo and basil.

  • Minted sweet pea and spinach soup

    • ellabee on May 26, 2014

      Excellent. Lunch guests 28 May 2014 asked for recipe (served w Smitten Kitchen asparagus-stuffed eggs). Used two 9-oz pkgs spinach, one 12-oz peas, and 3.5 cups homemade chicken stock; also squeezed thawed spinach v thoroughly before cooking. Didn't do separating etc, just buzzed with immersion blender until smooth enough. In retrospect, having recently read tip from Judy Rodgers of Zuni Cafe on immersion blending, would follow SP advice because my all-at-once approach took way too long to reach desired smoothness. Made day before; removed from fridge an hour ahead of gentle reheating, which took 20 minutes.

  • Blue cheese soup with bacon

    • Katielang on January 08, 2017

      Really lovely soup with a lot of character. I have made it as-written several times to great success. This time, I added a tsp dry mustard and a few dashes of Worcester sauce as well as freshly ground black pepper. Oh, and a few bay leaves for the simmering portion. Much easier to make if you have an immersion blender! I would also suggest withholding salt until the very end of the recipe, as the chicken stock and blue cheese add quite a bit.

  • Chicken Marbella

    • Laura on November 05, 2010

      I know this is a really popular dish, howver, I have to say, I'm just not crazy about it.

    • KarenS on September 18, 2011

      Love this recipe! The play of sweet, sour, salty, savory flavors is marvelous. Plus it's a great make ahead dish for a crowd -- marinate it the night before, dump on a baking sheet and stick in the oven. I use a generous variety of dried fruits, especially apricots, not just prunes, and I quarter them so they scatter more nicely. I use skinless, bone-in chicken thighs rather than a whole chicken. I'm pretty generous with the capers and olives. And I never put the brown sugar on (which isn't even on the EYB list) -- I accidentally left it off the first time, and thought the dish was plenty sweet without it.

    • ellabee on December 22, 2012

      This is excellent made with skin-on thighs. Original recipe is several times too sweet; restrict sugar to amt needed to dust the skins sitting above the braising liquid (so that they glaze and crisp; if necessary, run them under broiler to do so).

    • jenn on December 23, 2012

      As others have written, this is a great go-to recipe, but it is much better with only a small amount of brown sugar sprinkled over the top before baking.

    • lorloff on May 02, 2016

      Excellent dish used a combination of prunes and apricots. Doubled the garlic and used about 1.5 X the olives. A real winner delicious. used only chicken thighs bone in with skin

    • damazinah on June 28, 2016

      I wasn't crazy about this. It was really just another marinated chicken recipe.

  • Raspberry chicken

    • Salt on May 24, 2011

      Although the name and flavor of this might seem unusual or unconventional.... it is divine and a flavor/dish not to be forgotten. Our go to chicken dish for years. A real keeper. I am always surprised that chicken marbella gets the spotlight..this is much superior and complex flavor! Try this one!

  • Chicken Dijonnaise

    • DKennedy on February 23, 2015

      This has been a go to recipe of mine for many years. It is wonderful topped with artichoke hearts, reminiscent of a dish that once on the menu at The Cheesecake Factory. I prefer to use boneless, skinless chicken breasts.

  • Braised short ribs of beef

    • Laura on November 14, 2009

      Pg. 129. Made this last night and it was quite good, although I expect it will be even better as leftovers tonight as the flavors will have had more time to deepen.

  • Chili for a crowd

    • Salt on May 24, 2011

      This chili is outstanding! The use of sausage in it is wonderful. We have been making this for years without the beans...I always add a little extra mustard. Terrific flavor - even better the next day.

    • Rachaelsb on October 30, 2013

      Great straightforward chili--not too complex. Easy and quick to make. Could even add more sausage.

    • Lee on January 10, 2015

      Very nice chili. Some wanted it to be hotter, but it is a great base recipe that can be tweaked.

  • Navarin of lamb

    • Laura on April 14, 2011

      I have owned this book for at least 20 years and yet I had never made this recipe before. I chose it as a way to use up some homemade beef stock that has been in my freezer since January. This is a nice, light spring stew, not to be confused with a hearty stew. The sauce was, as intended, quite thin, although tasty. It did not have the depth of flavor of a heartier stew, it was more delicately flavored. I realize that the snow peas were intended to compliment the spring-like nature of the stew, but they really didn't work for me. I'd replace them with mushrooms and new potatoes. I'd also add more pearl onions.

  • Black bean soup

    • PinchOfSalt on November 13, 2013

      I used only 4 quarts of water instead of six. The soup was just right - a little on the thick side, like split pea soup. Six quarts would have been watery. Also, omitted the red pepper because I didn't have any and did not miss it.

  • Marinated garbanzo salad

    • Ivy on December 13, 2012

      page 216 must be marinated for 24 hours

  • Creamy coleslaw

    • AgusiaH on May 02, 2012

      Nice flavour. I added napa cabbage instead of green cabbage, some finely chopped celery and substituted natural yogurt for sour cream.

  • French dressing

    • damazinah on January 05, 2016

      Fantastic dressing, so much better than store bought!

  • Grandma Clark's soda bread

    • PatriciaAnn on February 20, 2013

      I make this every St. Patrick's Day. It's delicious. It's more cake-like than bread-like and is not dry, but melt-in-your-mouth buttery. For even more flavor, serve with Irish butter. We serve it for breakfast, wrap the extra and serve it again along with our dinner. It keeps for a few days.

  • Black walnut cookies

    • hillsboroks on December 22, 2016

      This cookie recipe is a waste of time and ingredients. My black walnuts had turned rancid so I substituted toasted regular walnuts but even so the cookie should have been at least edible. For the first time ever I tossed out a complete batch of cookies after my husband suggested it. I followed the recipe to a T except for the substitution of the walnuts but the results were terribly bland and tasteless. I tried baking them a bit longer to add some crispness which didn't work and even made a lemon glaze to try to give them a flavor boost. Alas none of it worked. I love the Silver Palate cookbooks and this is the first recipe fail I have encountered in more than 25 years of using them.

  • Chunky apple walnut cake

    • jzanger on September 27, 2010

      This cake has it all: it's moist, full of apple flavor, and it's got booze goin' on! Really, it's consistently impressive and delicious. 09/12 addition: because there is so much apple be sure to cut cubes between 1/2 and 3/4 inches. I've also decided that next time I will try using only 1 and 1/4 cups sugar baked into the cake

  • Lime mousse

    • bgbmus on December 22, 2015

      The mousse in this book is good. Easy to create, in addition.

  • Chocolate hazelnut cake

    • bgbmus on December 22, 2015

      Of course, I made this on a sweltering late September afternoon as a birthday gift for someone. It feels like hours, peeling hazelnuts. Was it worth the effort? In a word yes.

  • Creme brulee

    • Smokeydoke on January 06, 2017

      Someone else rated this two stars, so good, it wasn't just me. Ha. Yeah, was excited to see this book at the thrift store and tried their creme brulee. I don't know if this is how they ate it in the eighties, but my creme curdled, was flavorless, and no one makes it in ramekins anymore. Also there wasn't enough sugar to create a proper crust. So many better variations out there now.

  • Bismarcks

    • mike245 on December 04, 2012

      I made the Bismarck in a seasoned, cast iron skillet and reduced the butter to 1.5 tablespoons. It turned out well (and rose beautifully, almost like a souffle), but still had excess butter that I had to pour off after it cooked. I can't imagine how greasy it would have been with a whole stick. Next time, I'll use just enough butter to barely coat the pan before adding the batter.

  • Hummus bi tahini

    • Bloominanglophile on June 13, 2013

      I have been making this recipe for almost 20 years now. Store bought hummus cannot compare to this. I confess to using canned chickpeas for a quick evening meal--someday I will try it with dried chickpeas. Anyway, I just use 2 cans of chickpeas instead of ending up with a partially used can--works out fine. I also toast the cumin seeds before grinding for more flavor. Do add the lemon juice gradually--I usually use less than called for. I serve this with pita bread, carrot and celery sticks, red pepper and cucumber for a light meal. This is also great for a picnic--travels well.

    • adukeman on March 01, 2015

      I made the recipe as directed. I used dried chickpeas, cooked in a pressure cooker therefore skipping the usual overnight soaking. I put them in the food processor bowl while still warm. This made for a smooth-as-silk hummus. I was surprised the recipe needed all the lemon and garlic, but it most certainly did. Perfect batch!

  • Salmon mousse

    • mamacrumbcake on March 25, 2016

      Love this! I remember making it for the first time 25 years ago--I felt so accomplished and grown up. The flavors of the salmon, herbs, and Tabasco are delicious and well balanced. I never make this anymore because this type of dish is not the current fashion. Too bad! It is so good and deserves a comeback!

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Reviews about this book

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Reviews about Recipes in this Book

  • Salad Nicoise

    • Tea & Cookies

      I’ve since made this dish for a million potlucks and picnics, always to great acclaim. It may not be absolutely traditional, especially in the olive department, but it’s really quite good.

      Full review
  • Linzer hearts

    • Tea & Cookies

      I have a soft spot in my heart for Linzer Torte, from my time living in Austria, and these cookies play off the traditional flavors of nuts and fruit jam.

      Full review
  • ISBN 10 0894802046
  • ISBN 13 9780894802041
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Jun 30 1991
  • Format Paperback
  • Page Count 384
  • Language English
  • Edition New edition
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Workman Publishing
  • Imprint Workman Publishing

Publishers Text

With over 2.2 million copies in print, the widely acclaimed "The Silver Palate Cookbook" is firmly established as a contemporary classic. Originally published in 1982, the book's elegant, innovative recipes and emphasis on pure, fresh, ingredients ushered a new passion for food and hospitality into the American consciousness. The lively collection of clear, step-by-step recipes ranges from sublimely refined traditions-Pesto, Manhattan Clam Chowder, and Stuffed Artichokes-to original creations certain to become the topic of conversation at any dinner party. There's Paté de Campagne with Walnuts and Juniper Berries. Fruit-Stuffed Cornish Hens. Caviar Eclairs. Blueberry Bisque. Plus over 300 more recipes for hors d'oeuvres, dips and sauces, picnic fare, entrSes, salads, soups, breads, desserts. Throughout the book are valuable menu and serving suggestions, literary quotes, food guides, food lore, and whimsical illustrations. Selection of the "Book-of-the-Month Club," "Quality Paperback Book Club," "Book-of-the-Month Club's HomeStyle Books," "Better Homes & Gardens Family Book Service," and the "ABA Basic Booklist," A James Beard Book Awards and IACP inductee into the cookbook Hall of Fame.

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