ashallen's Bookshelf

  • The flavor profile of this soup is not a kind I crave, so I probably won't make it again. It's pretty earthy without sweetness or acidic brightness, though the ginger lightened it a bit. I chose to use a Punjabi-style garam masala I had on hand for the "garam masala" called for in the recipe, but a brighter, more citrusy garam masala would have worked better. On the plus side, however, it did a great job of immediately settling an upset stomach I had and, given all various greens it contains, is a very healthy soup! Relatively thin-textured, though swirling in yogurt thickens it a bit. Author doesn't mention anything about adding salt for this particular recipe - I ended up adding 1-1.5 tsp.
    about Pureed spinach soup from 1,000 Indian Recipes added on November 26, 2020

  • This is a variation of Julia Child's master recipe for "Chicken Simmered in White Wine" that has you make a cream sauce for the master dish. I entered an EYB note for the master dish, so I'll just comment on the sauce here. The sauce is basically a creamy chicken gravy - always a nice thing! However, we actually preferred the more intensely chicken-y, slightly tangy flavor of the sauce before the cream was added and mellowed everything out. Recipe doesn't specify how concentrated the chicken cooking liquids should be before using it for the sauce. I cooked them down to 3 cups total, at which point they had a nice strong flavor (and seemed like about the right volume for the roux quantity specified in the recipe), but would try 2-2.5 cups if adding cream in the future.
    about Blanquette of chicken in white wine sauce from Way To Cook added on November 19, 2020

  • Very chicken soup-like but with more chicken relative to broth than a typical soup. Nice and pleasant vs. stupendous. Recipe doesn't suggest any particular size pot - I used an 8 quart dutch oven. Recipe says to use "about 1.5 cups" chicken stock but also says to add enough stock to barely cover chicken and veggies. The 1.5 c wasn't nearly enough to cover the chicken, even after I moved the chicken and veggies around in the pot to pack them more tightly. I ended up adding a bunch of water (didn't have more stock) to get the chicken covered - maybe I should have used a 6 quart pot! Even with all the extra water, the final broth was still very nice after cooking and it was easy enough to reduce it further after pulling out the chicken and veggies. Chicken texture was firmer than we prefer after the 30 minutes of simmering suggested in the recipe - I ended up simmering for 1.5 hours to make it more tender. Substituted 2 large fresh thyme sprigs for dried tarragon - worked well.
    about Chicken simmered in white wine from Way To Cook added on November 19, 2020

  • Very good stew - given the basic nature of the recipe, I was actually surprised that I liked it as much as I did! Both the meat and the vegetables come out very nicely tender. Not as sumptuously flavored as one of Julia Child's beef stew recipes, but like TrishaCP, I love that it skips the messy meat-browning step. Easy to pull together overall - trimming the meat of excess fat/membrane was the most fiddly part. Freezes well. [Cross-post Slow Cooker Revolution/Complete Slow Cooker]
    about Hearty beef stew from Complete Slow Cooker added on November 16, 2020

  • Nice pancakes - love the feta - though I still prefer the flavor and texture of my usual recipe (Turkish Zucchini Pancakes from Bon Appetit January 1996). However, I think I lost much of the "fluffing" benefit of the beaten egg whites in this recipe because I kept stirring and adjusting the batter. The first pancakes were too mildly flavored for my taste so I ended up adding a heaping teaspoon of fine sea salt, doubling the fresh mint, and adding more black pepper. Also, the batter seemed thin - maybe my zucchini were extra-juicy or maybe the 650g/23 oz I used was more than the author intended - so I also stirred in a bunch of bread crumbs to thicken it.
    about Zucchini-feta pancakes from Moosewood Cookbook, New Revised Edition added on November 14, 2020

  • We really like this cornbread recipe and have made it many times. I especially love the texture which is high, light (but still substantial), a bit springy, and moist. Not too sweet and good corn flavor. Be careful not to overbake - it dries out. It's definitely best the day it's made, but keeps okay for a day or so. Recipe calls for stone-ground cornmeal but a coarse grind yielded a gritty cornbread - we like a medium or fine grind best. Also works well when doubled and baked in a 9x13-inch pan. [Cross-post for Cook's Ill. Magazine/Cook's Ill. 1995 Annual Edition/ Cook's Ill. Cookbook/ The Complete Slow Cooker/ A Bread a Day blog]
    about Golden Northern cornbread from Complete Slow Cooker added on November 13, 2020

  • We really like this cornbread recipe and have made it many times. I especially love the texture which is high, light (but still substantial), a bit springy, and moist. Not too sweet and good corn flavor. Be careful not to overbake - it dries out. It's definitely best the day it's made, but keeps okay for a day or so. Recipe calls for stone-ground cornmeal but a coarse grind yielded a gritty cornbread - we like a medium or fine grind best. Also works well when doubled and baked in a 9x13-inch pan. [Cross-post for Cook's Ill. Magazine/Cook's Ill. 1995 Annual Edition/ Cook's Ill. Cookbook/ The Complete Slow Cooker/ A Bread a Day blog]
    about Golden Northern cornbread from Cook's Illustrated Cookbook added on November 13, 2020

  • We really like this cornbread recipe and have made it many times. I especially love the texture which is high, light (but still substantial), a bit springy, and moist. Not too sweet and good corn flavor. Be careful not to overbake - it dries out. It's definitely best the day it's made, but keeps okay for a day or so. Recipe calls for stone-ground cornmeal but a coarse grind yielded a gritty cornbread - we like a medium or fine grind best. Also works well when doubled and baked in a 9x13-inch pan. [Cross-post for Cook's Ill. Magazine/Cook's Ill. 1995 Annual Edition/ Cook's Ill. Cookbook/ The Complete Slow Cooker/ A Bread a Day blog]

  • We really like this cornbread recipe and have made it many times. I especially love the texture which is high, light (but still substantial), a bit springy, and moist. Not too sweet and good corn flavor. Be careful not to overbake - it dries out. It's definitely best the day it's made, but keeps okay for a day or so. Recipe calls for stone-ground cornmeal but a coarse grind yielded a gritty cornbread - we like a medium or fine grind best. Also works well when doubled and baked in a 9x13-inch pan. [Cross-post for Cook's Ill. Magazine/Cook's Ill. 1995 Annual Edition/ Cook's Ill. Cookbook/ The Complete Slow Cooker/ A Bread a Day blog]

  • We really like this cornbread recipe and have made it many times. I especially love the texture which is high, light (but still substantial), a bit springy, and moist. Not too sweet and good corn flavor. Be careful not to overbake - it dries out. It's definitely best the day it's made, but keeps okay for a day or so. Recipe calls for stone-ground cornmeal but a coarse grind yielded a gritty cornbread - we like a medium or fine grind best. Also works well when doubled and baked in a 9x13-inch pan. [Cross-post for Cook's Ill. Magazine/Cook's Ill. 1995 Annual Edition/ Cook's Ill. Cookbook/ The Complete Slow Cooker/ A Bread a Day blog]
    about Golden Northern cornbread from A Bread a Day added on November 13, 2020

  • This cake was decidedly "just OK" for me. While parts of it had a light texture a bit like angel food cake, I found other parts to be too heavy/doughy from the moisture from the apples. One of my apples was refrigerator-cold which may not have helped things, though I did bake the cake 5-10 minutes longer than specified to get the tester to emerge cleanly from the center. I used 20.5 oz untrimmed apples to yield the specified 3 cups of grated apple, but my cups were packed - perhaps the author intended those cups to be less packed and for less apple to be used. The cake also wasn't sweet enough for my taste which wasn't helped along by my tart Granny Smith apples. At least I feel OK eating it for breakfast, and a drizzle of honey has added both sweetness and a flavor that works well with the apples.
    about Apple cloud cake from Moosewood Cookbook, New Revised Edition added on November 12, 2020

  • We really enjoyed this (and my husband *loved* it). The sauce has nice brightness from the wine/vinegar/tomato that works very well with the meaty flavors. The herbs and spices were very aromatic early in the cooking process but mellowed considerably by the end. They may have mellowed more than the recipe intended since I simmered everything for a couple of additional hours (we like the meat to be very tender). Using a 6-quart dutch oven to both brown and simmer meat worked fine. Simmered in a 275F oven vs. on stovetop. Note that this recipe requires 2 days of prep if you follow its suggestion to marinate the meat overnight before cooking it. Recipe suggests skimming fat from sauce after reheating on Day 2, but it was easy enough before reheating to lift off the solid fat that formed on the sauce's surface after its overnight chill. The cooked vegetables in the sauce did a great job of thickening it once pureed. I reduced the cooking liquids to ~4 cups total for the sauce.
    about Tyrolean pot roast from Italian Country Table added on November 12, 2020

  • Great comfort food for a cold night. The flavor of the spiced meat mixture with the salty feta is delicious and I enjoyed the springy texture of the homemade noodles. Recipe calls for a "medium-size" casserole dish - I used a 1.5 quart/8x8-inch dish which worked well. I substituted 6 oz drained canned whole tomatoes for the fresh tomato and roughly chopped slivered blanched almonds for the pine nuts - both substitutions worked very well. I was also short on lamb and used 2/3 lamb + 1/3 ground beef. We accidentally ate up all of our yogurt earlier this week and were unable to make the sauce, but the casserole was still great without it.

  • Very nice cake. The light fruitiness and tartness from the pomegranate molasses works really nicely with the butter and cinnamon flavors. The cake base is tender and moist and the crumbs on top have a bit of chew which is great. My cake came out much shorter than I expected from the photo - only 1 inch high for both crumbs and cake. I used the whole big pile of crumbs called for in the recipe (I love crumbs) - maybe their weight crushed the cake! As the recipe headnotes point out, this is a variation on a Cook's Illustrated/America's Test Kitchen recipe for "New York Style Crumb Cake" - the original version doesn't call for pomegranate molasses. The author of this recipe also simplified some aspects of the original recipe (e.g., left out ingredient weights and some assembly details). I went back to the original Cook's Illustrated recipe for that information and also used cake flour (King Arthur unbleached) as specified in that recipe.
    about Pomegranate molasses crumb cake from Food52 added on October 30, 2020

  • A nice, simple side dish. The sauce has a light, clean, gingery flavor that works very nicely with the flavor of broccoli. I made a big substitution in that I used the peeled and slivered stems of "regular" broccoli for this dish - worked well. The sauce was light enough that the broccoli flavor still came through, even with the relatively milder flavor of my broccoli stems.

  • This recipe contains a generous amount (1 tbsp) of black cumin seed (not nigella seed, but rather the black cumin that looks a bit like caraway seed) which I generally like but found to be heavier than I prefer in this dish. I did halve the chicken quantity specified in the recipe - perhaps I would have liked the flavor better had I used the full amount. Potatoes were nicely tender and did a great job absorbing and holding the flavors from the dish. The recipe specifies using cooked potatoes - I simply microwaved them and left the skins on - worked well. Easy dish to make.

  • This basic recipe hasn't changed since my 1965 edition :). My older edition does mention the possibility of using an additional egg and up to 1/2 cup sugar, however, and omitting 2 tbsp from the 2 cups of flour if using all-purpose vs. pastry flour. It also has a variation called "orange muffins" which has disappeared from later editions that calls for mixing in 3/4 c diced candied orange peel. That's the variation I made, using homemade peel I'd packed in syrup that's very tender. I also used the extra egg, the 1/2 c sugar, and an extra 1/4 tsp salt since I thought all that orange peel might need some balancing out. I subtracted the 2 tbsp of flour. These were surprisingly good - the large amount of orange peel was really delicious. The basic cake part did its job supporting the peel and had a slightly springy (but not tough) texture. On its own, it'd be on the plain side, but it's a fine background for various add-ins or spreading with butter and jam.
    about Basic muffins from Fannie Farmer Cookbook added on October 26, 2020

  • This basic recipe hasn't changed since my 1965 edition :). My older edition does mention the possibility of using an additional egg and up to 1/2 cup sugar, however, and omitting 2 tbsp from the 2 cups of flour if using all-purpose vs. pastry flour. It also has a variation called "orange muffins" which has disappeared from later editions that calls for mixing in 3/4 c diced candied orange peel. That's the variation I made, using homemade peel I'd packed in syrup that's very tender. I also used the extra egg, the 1/2 c sugar, and an extra 1/4 tsp salt since I thought all that orange peel might need some balancing out. I subtracted the 2 tbsp of flour. These were surprisingly good - the large amount of orange peel was really delicious. The basic cake part did its job supporting the peel and had a slightly springy (but not tough) texture. On its own, it'd be on the plain side, but it's a fine background for various add-ins or spreading with butter and jam.
    about Basic muffins from Fannie Farmer Baking Book added on October 26, 2020

  • This basic recipe hasn't changed since my 1965 edition :). My older edition does mention the possibility of using an additional egg and up to 1/2 cup sugar, however, and omitting 2 tbsp from the 2 cups of flour if using all-purpose vs. pastry flour. It also has a variation called "orange muffins" which has disappeared from later editions that calls for mixing in 3/4 c diced candied orange peel. That's the variation I made, using homemade peel I'd packed in syrup that's very tender. I also used the extra egg, the 1/2 c sugar, and an extra 1/4 tsp salt since I thought all that orange peel might need some balancing out. I subtracted the 2 tbsp of flour. These were surprisingly good - the large amount of orange peel was really delicious. The basic cake part did its job supporting the peel and had a slightly springy (but not tough) texture. On its own, it'd be on the plain side, but it's a fine background for various add-ins or spreading with butter and jam.
    about Basic muffins from Fannie Farmer Cookbook added on October 26, 2020

  • These are very nice, but then I'm always a fan of raisin-nut-meat dishes! I substituted chopped slivered blanched almonds for the pine nuts which worked OK - they weren't as tender as pine nuts. I roughly chopped the raisins also to disperse them more evenly in the meatball mixture. Salt is "to taste" - I used 3/4 tsp fine salt but would use more next time. Some of my meatballs overshot the minimum cooking temperature for ground beef/lamb (160F) and were less tender and juicy than the more lightly cooked ones, so I'll keep a closer eye on them in the future. We didn't squeeze lemon juice on them as the author suggests but did eat them with pomegranate molasses glazed carrots tossed with cilantro (Melissa Clark recipe) which worked really well.

  • Made these again using White Lily self-rising flour as called for in the recipe and, as promised, they were wonderfully tender (a bit more so than when made with King Arthur's unbleached cake flour). In fact, they were so tender that a couple of them "exploded" into pieces when I inverted the biscuits onto a serving plate. I was moving quickly and must have been too rough - next time I'll handle them more carefully!
    about Touch-of-grace biscuits from Pie and Pastry Bible added on October 23, 2020

  • Made these again using White Lily self-rising flour as called for in the recipe and, as promised, they were wonderfully tender (a bit more so than when made with King Arthur's unbleached cake flour). In fact, they were so tender that a couple of them "exploded" into pieces when I inverted the biscuits onto a serving plate. I was moving quickly and must have been too rough - next time I'll handle them more carefully!
    about Touch-of-grace biscuits from Bread Bible added on October 23, 2020

  • It's been many years since I've made this recipe, but I thought it was pretty good at the time. I substituted fresh herbs for the dried, included the optional parsley and olives, and bumped up the onion quantity a bit for a more strongly-flavored dish.
    about Ratatouille from Moosewood Cookbook, New Revised Edition added on October 22, 2020

  • I'm fond of fruit in savory dishes and of sweet flavors in general, but I didn't love the particular mix of sweet and savory in this dish.
    about Stuffed cabbage from Moosewood Cookbook, New Revised Edition added on October 21, 2020

  • I found this to be just OK and the flavor to be a bit thin/watery. Perhaps it was the quality of my ingredients? Or maybe some cream in place of some of the water/milk called for in the recipe would help...
    about Cream of broccoli from Moosewood Cookbook, New Revised Edition added on October 18, 2020