ashallen's Bookshelf

  • I found this to be just OK and the flavor to be a bit thin/watery. Perhaps it was the quality of my ingredients? Or maybe some cream in place of some of the water/milk called for in the recipe would help...
    about Cream of broccoli from Moosewood Cookbook, New Revised Edition added on October 18, 2020

  • These are delicious! Nice tender texture, too. My husband was initially skeptical but became a fan after first bite. Thanks to everyone's notes, I carefully weighed my zucchini and hand-squeezed the shreds to remove some moisture. I also pan-cooked the burgers over medium-low heat and skipped the oven step. I accidentally left out the garlic, but they were still very flavorful. The sauce was also very tasty and creamy, but I found it obscured some of the herb/spice flavors in the burgers for me (which I really liked tasting), so I used it as a dressing for chopped fresh tomato instead which I served on the the side - worked well.
    about Turkey & zucchini burgers with spring onion & cumin from Jerusalem added on October 18, 2020

  • This is a very good and very dependable angel food cake recipe. I've made it many times over the years, and it has always come out light, tender, and moist. This is despite the fact that I've strayed from the recipe instructions at times, e.g. substituted all-purpose flour for cake flour (somewhat heavier texture, but still very good), skipped sifting the flour, reduced the sugar by 1/4 c, and/or substituted lime juice for lemon juice. [Cross-post for Cook's Ill. Magazine/ Cooks Ill. 1993 Annual Edition / Cook's Ill. Cookbook / Science of Good Cooking]

  • This is a very good and very dependable angel food cake recipe. I've made it many times over the years, and it has always come out light, tender, and moist. This is despite the fact that I've strayed from the recipe instructions at times, e.g. substituted all-purpose flour for cake flour (somewhat heavier texture, but still very good), skipped sifting the flour, reduced the sugar by 1/4 c, and/or substituted lime juice for lemon juice. [Cross-post for Cook's Ill. Magazine/ Cooks Ill. 1993 Annual Edition / Cook's Ill. Cookbook / Science of Good Cooking]
    about Best angel food cake from Cook's Illustrated Cookbook added on October 15, 2020

  • This is a very good and very dependable angel food cake recipe. I've made it many times over the years, and it has always come out light, tender, and moist. This is despite the fact that I've strayed from the recipe instructions at times, e.g. substituted all-purpose flour for cake flour (somewhat heavier texture, but still very good), skipped sifting the flour, reduced the sugar by 1/4 c, and/or substituted lime juice for lemon juice. I bake it at 325F and the crust doesn't darken beyond tan/light-medium brown. The cake definitely needs to be released from the cake pan sides with a knife, which sometimes causes a bit of "shagginess" in the crust - I lightly press any crumbs that get raised up during the cake's release back into the cake's sides. [Cross-post for Cook's Ill. Magazine/ Cooks Ill. 1993 Annual Edition / Cook's Ill. Cookbook / Science of Good Cooking]
    about Angel food cake from Science of Good Cooking added on October 15, 2020

  • This is a very good and very dependable angel food cake recipe. I've made it many times over the years, and it has always come out light, tender, and moist. This is despite the fact that I've strayed from the recipe instructions at times, e.g. substituted all-purpose flour for cake flour (somewhat heavier texture, but still very good), skipped sifting the flour, reduced the sugar by 1/4 c, and/or substituted lime juice for lemon juice. [Cross-post for Cook's Ill. Magazine/ Cooks Ill. 1993 Annual Edition / Cook's Ill. Cookbook / Science of Good Cooking]

  • Great cake!! I picked this recipe to use up the last of some homemade candied citron and was expecting a typical spice cake but it has a really nice dark, spicy flavor brightened by the diced raisins and citron. I'll look forward to trying it with candied orange peel. Texture was moist without being dense. I used King Arthur's unbleached cake flour and baked the cake in a 10-inch angel food cake pan instead of the loaf pan called for in the recipe. Removed from oven once center reached 205F after 40-45 minutes. King Arthur's recipe is a lightly modified version of a recipe in the 1965 edition of The Fannie Farmer Cookbook. The Fannie Farmer version calls for a bit more milk and molasses (2/3 cup each), a bit more sugar (3/4 cup vs 1/2) and 2 vs 3 eggs. I used the Fannie Farmer ingredient amounts and the King Arthur baking instructions which are more detailed/helpful than those in Fannie Farmer. Keeps well.

  • Great cake!! I picked this recipe to use up the last of some homemade candied citron and was expecting a typical spice cake but it has a really nice dark, spicy flavor brightened by the diced raisins and citron. I'll look forward to trying it with candied orange peel. Texture was moist without being dense. I used King Arthur's unbleached cake flour and baked the cake in a 10-inch angel food cake pan instead of the loaf pan called for in the recipe. Removed from oven once center reached 205F after 40-45 minutes. King Arthur's recipe is a lightly modified version of a recipe in the 1965 edition of The Fannie Farmer Cookbook. The Fannie Farmer version calls for a bit more milk and molasses (2/3 cup each), a bit more sugar (3/4 cup vs 1/2) and 2 vs 3 eggs. I used the Fannie Farmer ingredient amounts and the King Arthur baking instructions which are more detailed/helpful than those in Fannie Farmer. Keeps well.
    about Molasses pound cake from Sift Magazine, Holiday 2016 added on October 06, 2020

  • Almond Poppy Seed Bread (p. 246): Very nice - rich, moist, tender, close-crumbed. Definitely a cake versus a bread! The orange juice concentrate-based glaze works really well with the almond and poppy seed flavors. I made half the recipe (1 loaf vs. 2) and that worked fine. The batter's pretty liquidy and the top of the cake was well-browned by the time the cake center finished setting but didn't turn bitter. Some of my ingredients were cooler than room temperature so that probably contributed to the center taking a bit longer to set. Doesn't have a ton of poppy seeds - I'll probably double or triple them in the future since I like their flavor and the cake is moist enough to handle extra without drying out. Recipe says to mix glaze to "spreading" consistency and spread it on top of the cake. Mine was definitely a "pouring" consistency and there was more than would coat/soak into the top of the cake, so I coated the sides with it, too.
    about Savor the Flavor of Oregon added on October 02, 2020

  • This recipe has many fans on the NYT website, but it came out just OK for me. On the plus side, it was quick and easy. I thought the flavor of the pomegranate molasses dabbed on the meatballs was OK but not fabulous - I would have preferred more of a cooked, reduced glaze. Normally I would have stuck them back under the broiler to cook the glaze a bit, but I had already overcooked the meatballs. They're small and they cook fast! I was able to dab 1-1.5 tbsp pomegranate molasses on the meatballs before it started to slide off, so there was about 1.5-2 tbsp unused molasses. I would have also liked the meat to have been more strongly seasoned and/or flavored (e.g., more orange zest, herbs).

  • I agree with okcook that this recipe doesn't specify a long enough cooking time given that it has you cut the carrots into 2-inch "nuggets" (halved only if carrots are large). I prefer Melissa Clark's "Pomegranate Roasted Carrots" recipe which specifies cutting the carrots into longer, thinner pieces, squeezing fewer carrots onto the baking pan, and roasting for a longer time. Since I'm a sugar fiend, however, I did enjoy the addition of honey and the slightly larger ratio of pomegranate molasses-to-carrot in this recipe's glaze.

  • I agree with fprincess that this is an excellent recipe to use up egg whites since it uses quite a few (1 cup/~8) and comes together quickly. Very nice almond-butter flavor. We also really enjoyed the texture which was a a bit crispy-chewy on the outside and moist-tender on the inside. These bake at a relatively high temperature (425F) and it's good to keep a close eye on them - the cakes in my lighter-weight muffin tin were ready a few minutes before the time specified in the recipe. Stated recipe yield is 12 cakes, but I think that might be a typo because there was enough batter to fill 24 standard-size muffin tin cups halfway as specified in the recipe (yay - more cakes!). Butter the tins generously - the cakes stick a bit.
    about Rich almond cakes (Financiers) from Country Cooking of France added on September 28, 2020

  • A great pot roast-style dish with very tender beef and a thick, flavorful sauce. The tomatoes and large amount of wine added a tart edge to the sauce which differed from some other braised beef dishes I've made where earthier flavors (e.g., mushrooms) dominated. Delicious with egg noodles. Actually, I thought the sauce was a bit too tart once first reduced, but it adjusted well with some honey and soy sauce. It also mellowed further during storage overnight. I used a tart Cabernet Sauvignon instead of Barolo which might explain the tartness! Butcher was out of chuck eye roast, but since we were eating the dish with pasta, we didn't care so much about getting coherent meat slices, so regular chuck roast worked fine. I cut it into chunks for trimming and didn't bother to tie it back together in roast form. [Cross-post Cook's Ill. Magazine/ Cook's Ill. 2005 Annual Edition/ Cook's Ill. Cookbook/ Leite's Culinaria website]
    about Beef braised in Barolo from Cook's Illustrated Cookbook added on September 27, 2020

  • A great pot roast-style dish with very tender beef and a thick, flavorful sauce. The tomatoes and large amount of wine added a tart edge to the sauce which differed from some other braised beef dishes I've made where earthier flavors (e.g., mushrooms) dominated. Delicious with egg noodles. Actually, I thought the sauce was a bit too tart once first reduced, but it adjusted well with some honey and soy sauce. It also mellowed further during storage overnight. I used a tart Cabernet Sauvignon instead of Barolo which might explain the tartness! Butcher was out of chuck eye roast, but since we were eating the dish with pasta, we didn't care so much about getting coherent meat slices, so regular chuck roast worked fine. I cut it into chunks for trimming and didn't bother to tie it back together in roast form. [Cross-post Cook's Ill. Magazine/ Cook's Ill. 2005 Annual Edition/ Cook's Ill. Cookbook/ Leite's Culinaria website]
    about Beef braised in Barolo from Cook's Illustrated Magazine, Mar/Apr 2005 added on September 27, 2020

  • A great pot roast-style dish with very tender beef and a thick, flavorful sauce. The tomatoes and large amount of wine added a tart edge to the sauce which differed from some other braised beef dishes I've made where earthier flavors (e.g., mushrooms) dominated. Delicious with egg noodles. Actually, I thought the sauce was a bit too tart once first reduced, but it adjusted well with some honey and soy sauce. It also mellowed further during storage overnight. I used a tart Cabernet Sauvignon instead of Barolo which might explain the tartness! Butcher was out of chuck eye roast, but since we were eating the dish with pasta, we didn't care so much about getting coherent meat slices, so regular chuck roast worked fine. I cut it into chunks for trimming and didn't bother to tie it back together in roast form. [Cross-post Cook's Ill. Magazine/ Cook's Ill. 2005 Annual Edition/ Cook's Ill. Cookbook/ Leite's Culinaria website]
    about Beef braised in Barolo from Leite's Culinaria added on September 27, 2020

  • A great pot roast-style dish with very tender beef and a thick, flavorful sauce. The tomatoes and large amount of wine added a tart edge to the sauce which differed from some other braised beef dishes I've made where earthier flavors (e.g., mushrooms) dominated. Delicious with egg noodles. Actually, I thought the sauce was a bit too tart once first reduced, but it adjusted well with some honey and soy sauce. It also mellowed further during storage overnight. I used a tart Cabernet Sauvignon instead of Barolo which might explain the tartness! Butcher was out of chuck eye roast, but since we were eating the dish with pasta, we didn't care so much about getting coherent meat slices, so regular chuck roast worked fine. I cut it into chunks for trimming and didn't bother to tie it back together in roast form. [Cross-post Cook's Ill. Magazine/ Cook's Ill. 2005 Annual Edition/ Cook's Ill. Cookbook/ Leite's Culinaria website]
    about Beef braised in Barolo from Cook's Illustrated Annual Edition 2005 added on September 27, 2020

  • Very good, very flavorful noodles. Also rich, meaty, starchy and quite "brown," so I liked balancing it out with simply cooked vegetables (chopped up steamed broccoli worked well). Makes enough sauce to generously coat noodles. Not super-spicy as written (and I'm no chili fiend). I'll try adding the optional Sichuan pepper next time for some additional zing. Leftovers kept well. [Cross-post The Cook's Ill. Cookbook / Cook's Ill. Annual Edition 2001/ Cook's Ill. Magazine]

  • Very good, very flavorful noodles. Also rich, meaty, starchy and quite "brown," so I liked balancing it out with simply cooked vegetables (chopped up steamed broccoli worked well). Makes enough sauce to generously coat noodles. Not super-spicy as written (and I'm no chili fiend). I'll try adding the optional Sichuan pepper next time for some additional zing. Leftovers kept well. [Cross-post The Cook's Ill. Cookbook / Cook's Ill. Annual Edition 2001/ Cook's Ill. Magazine]

  • Very good, very flavorful noodles. Also rich, meaty, starchy and quite "brown," so I liked balancing it out with simply cooked vegetables (chopped up steamed broccoli worked well). Makes enough sauce to generously coat noodles. Not super-spicy as written (and I'm no chili fiend). I'll try adding the optional Sichuan pepper next time for some additional zing. Leftovers kept well. [Cross-post The Cook's Ill. Cookbook / Cook's Ill. Annual Edition 2001/ Cook's Ill. Magazine]
    about Spicy Sichuan noodles from Cook's Illustrated Cookbook added on September 19, 2020

  • Very nice cake. Texture is substantial and moist without being overly dense or gummy. There's a bit of a crunch from the plentiful poppy seeds. Not super-sweet. I used 1 teaspoon vanilla + 2 teaspoons almond extract since I like the combination of almond and poppy seed flavors. Used 3/4 cup sour cream mixed with 1/4 cup buttermilk. Baked in a 10-inch angel food cake pan with a removable bottom since my springform pan tends to ooze butter. Removed from oven once center reached 195-200F which took 35 minutes. Recipe available online at https://www.thewednesdaychef.com/the_wednesday_chef/2012/05/deborah-madisons-poppyseed-cake.html
    about Poppyseed cake from Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone added on September 19, 2020

  • Ooops, should have followed the recipe more closely! Recipe said to bake cakes in mini cupcake papers sprayed with non-stick cooking spray. I didn't have papers and thought the cakes would be buttery enough to release OK from a buttered non-stick baking tin but unfortunately they stuck tight. Their texture is relatively light and tender, so they really didn't like being pried out. I also made each cake ~1.5x bigger than the recipe specified. That wasn't a good idea either since the tops ended up being very flat vs. domed and the tops oozed and merged into one another during baking. The (mangled) cakes have a nice light texture, moderate almond flavor, and aren't super-sweet - the glaze suggested in the recipe would be a nice addition. My larger-than-specified cakes were done by the time specified for smaller cakes, so it'd probably be good to check the smaller cakes early.
    about Butter almond tea cakes from Cupcakes! added on September 15, 2020

  • I chose this recipe to use up some bits and pieces of things and wasn't expecting much, but it's a deeply flavorful and savory dish. Risotto-like, but with a lower proportion of rice than most risottos I've made - the rice here is more like a creamy binder for the other ingredients. The dish is, however, very rich and a small amount goes a long way, so even though each serving as specified by the recipe is less than 1 cup, that's enough for me! I'd experiment in the future to see how much the oil/butter could be reduced without compromising the flavor. I used mostly plain ground pork instead of the sausage specified in the recipe and would do that again in the future since it's less fatty. Used homemade chicken stock and Arborio rice. Cooked in a saucepan, but I'm guessing the recipe was tested in a pan with a broader base since my onions took longer than the specified time to turn golden and there was some excess liquid to cook off after the rice finished cooking. Leftovers kept well.

  • The flavors in this pudding were nice and nicely balanced. I used clover honey and Ceylon cinnamon so the honey and cinnamon flavors didn't clobber the other flavors. It came out thicker than I prefer, though - thick enough to support a spoon standing upright immediately after cooking despite partially covering with a lid and adding some extra milk about half-way through. Leftovers thickened further after chilling - I reheated it and stirred in some more milk to get it back to a pudding-like consistency. The recipe has a higher ratio of rice to milk than some other recipes I've made - had I noted that before cooking, I would've cooked it at a more gentle simmer.

  • Very nice stir-fry with comforting, savory flavors - I always think of chicken noodle soup when I eat this dish! With a relatively short ingredient list and no "stages" in the stir-frying, it comes together pretty quickly. Uses *lots* of celery which is super since I always seem to have more than I need in the refrigerator. Recipe says to dice celery - I did a 1/4" dice which worked well and still had some crispness after cooking. When I first looked at the book photo, I thought the large green chunks were celery and I thought "that's a big dice!," but looking more closely, I think they're probably green peppers - recipe headnote mentions adding a pepper as an option.
    about Mrs. Miu's stir-fried chicken with cashews from Breath of a Wok added on September 07, 2020

  • Mmmm, these are decadently delicious string beans. Super-flavorful, sweet and sour, gingery. Definitely oily (like many dry-fried dishes), but because they're so flavorful, a modest serving works and makes a great accompaniment for a more simply-flavored dish. I like the flavor of string beans, but this happens to be a good dish for those who don't care for it much since it's buried beneath all of the other flavors. Recipe recommends using "young" string beans. I was able to get local, in-season beans but they were neither very slender nor "garden fresh" - still came out great!
    about Virginia Yee's dry-fried Sichuan string beans from Breath of a Wok added on September 02, 2020