robm's Bookshelf

  • This book leans toward Anglo-Jewish recipes but it includes choices from other countries. The recipes are good (it even has one for the mysterious – to Americans – "stuffed monkeys." It includes most of the Ashkenazi classics. Best of all, this book is close to, although not technically, a volume in LARGE PRINT. If you are looking for a Jewish cookbook for someone with vision problems, this is your choice!
    about Jewish Cooking from Around the World added on June 11, 2021

  • This book is BILINGUAL Italian-English. The recipes are in both languages.
    about Mangiare Veneto -Veneto Cookbook added on June 08, 2021

  • mama_c is correct: this wonderful book was reissued under the title "Sicilian Food." It's otherwise the same book, it seems. This is an invaluable addition to the library of anyone interested in seeing how foods and cooking methods have come down to us from antiquity and medieval times. Most people, I dare say, have no idea just how old some of the dishes we eat today really are. Simeti does a wonderful job tracing and describing contemporary recipes as far back as the days of ancient Greece and Rome. She does sometime take a somewhat authoritarian tone, like some other well-known cookbook authors ("Do it exactly the way I say or don't bother even trying this.") But her history and research are impressive and illuminating. Some of her recipes are more "modern." Pasta came to be known in Italy as much as 1000 years ago, and tomatoes and New World ingredients nearly 500 years ago. So all of these foods have long pedigrees!
    about Pomp And Sustenance added on June 03, 2021

  • Hundreds of authentic tapas recipes that are vegetarian or vegan (or can easily be veganized). Many of the tapas can also become main dishes. Most of the authentic ingredients are easily found outside Spain these days and most of the others have possible substitutions (cardoons, for example, are usually available only seasonally, but they have a flavor similar to artichokes, to which they're related, so artichoke hearts or bottoms could replace them if you can't get cardoons). I recommend this and I'm sure his other books are equally thorough and authentic (the author lives and farms in a region of Andalucía).
    about Traditional Vegetarian Tapas Recipes of Spain added on May 20, 2021

  • To paraphrase a famous advertising pitch, you don't have to be gay (or Jewish) to enjoy this book! Lots of tasty dishes, with multiple versions of brisket and kugel and other favorites, reflecting the extremely varied backgrounds of the congregants at Sha'ar Zahav who contributed these recipes.
    about Out of Our Kitchen Closets added on May 03, 2021

  • Updated versions of The Settlement Cook Book from at least 1965 up to the radical 1990s Charles Pierce Version modernize the format and layout, but keep virtually all the original/classic recipes, with some subtle additions (like a recipe for Sour Cream Coffee Cake) and nods to new techniques/appliances. Generally they hew closely to Mrs. Simon Kander's versions, though.
    about Settlement Cook Book added on April 17, 2021

  • Along with "The Joy of Cooking," and "Fannie Farmer," this is one of the great standard American cookbooks. It originated in a 1901 cookbook prepared for an immigrant settlement house in Milwaukee, to teach American food ways to new arrivals. However, the cookbook also includes many ethnic dishes, especially German and Jewish specialties, which reflects the immigrant community in Milwaukee at the time the book was originally published. Full of excellent, well-tested, tried-and-true recipes. My mother and grandmother both cooked extensively from this book, which is how they earned their reputations as great cooks and bakers! The baking chapters of the Settlement Cook Book are legendary, with every classic Mittel-European cake, torte, kuchen, and confection you could hope for! Subsequent editions are in a larger format and reorganized more logically but keep virtually all the original recipes. The 1990s Charles Pierce revision DOES NOT. It does make an excellent partner for the original.
    about Settlement Cook Book added on April 17, 2021

  • Along with "The Joy of Cooking," and "Fannie Farmer," this is one of the great standard American cookbooks. It originated in a 1901 cookbook prepared for an immigrant settlement house in Milwaukee, to teach American food ways to new arrivals. However, the cookbook also includes many ethnic dishes, especially German and Jewish specialties, which reflects the immigrant community in Milwaukee at the time the book was originally published. Full of excellent, well-tested, tried-and-true recipes. My mother and grandmother both cooked extensively from this book, which is how they earned their reputations as great cooks and bakers! The baking chapters of the Settlement Cook Book are legendary, with every classic Mittel-European cake, torte, kuchen, and confection you could hope for! Subsequent editions are in a larger format and reorganized more logically but keep virtually all the original recipes. The 1990s Charles Pierce revision DOES NOT. It does make an excellent partner for the original.

  • The New Settlement Cookbook is an outstanding cookbook, but if you're looking for the original book or something close to it, this ISN'T the version you're looking for. The New Settlement is a drastic revision and updating of the classic cookbook, and many of the original recipes (perhaps half?) have vanished from this version, particularly savory dishes. The sweets have done better. Most of the famous cakes and kuchen and tortes have survived. In short, if you're looking for the book your mother or grandmother cooked from, you will need an earlier edition. This revision makes a good partner to the classic book -- between the two of them you will find endless good recipes, clearly explained. If you're searching for the classic book, you'll need to buy an edition from the 1940s or 50s, or the 1965 revision and update which reorganizes the earlier version into a more modern style and larger format but keeps virtually all the beloved original recipes.
    about New Settlement Cookbook added on April 17, 2021

  • The New Settlement Cookbook is an outstanding cookbook, but if you're looking for the original book or something close to it, this isn't the version you're looking for. The New Settlement is a drastic revision and updating of the classic cookbook, and many of the original recipes have vanished from this version, particularly savory dishes. Perhaps half of them? The sweets have done better. Most of the famous cakes and kuchen and tortes have survived. In short, if you are looking for the book your mother or grandmother cooked from, you will need an earlier edition. This revision makes a good partner to the classic book -- between the two books you will find endless good recipes, clearly explained. If you're searching for the classic book, you'll need to buy an edition from the 1940s or 50s, or the 1965 revision and update which reorganizes the earlier version in a more modern style and format but keeps virtually all the original recipes plus newer ones.
    about New Settlement Cookbook added on April 17, 2021

  • Florence Greenberg was the long time food editor/writer for the British "Jewish Chronicle," and her book is a virtual bible of Anglo-Jewish cookery. What is Anglo-Jewish? An interesting combination of heritage recipes from the Sephardim who were the first Jews allowed to resettle in England and the much later Ashkenazi immigrants. Sephardic influences include egg-lemon sauces, fried fish, and almond desserts (check out the unusual "stuffed monkey") which includes no monkey at all! This book is very well presented and laid out, with all recipes shown in metric/Imperial/American measurements and a brief glossary in the introduction with British and American names for kitchen ware. Definitely a "must have" for anyone interested in Jewish cooking!
    about Florence Greenberg's Jewish Cookbook added on March 24, 2021

  • Vegan Jewish cookbooks are always welcome, especially those like this that focus on widely popular traditional dishes that need a vegan makeover. Many such dishes would seem to be easy to veganize, given existing Jewish dietary customs, and they are, but a few are tough to convert successfully, like matzo balls and gefilte fish, both very popular Ashkenazi favorites (these are dumpling/quenelle-type preparations that normally are bound with egg). Recipes for Passover are especially difficult because many vegan ingredients are "off-limits" due to extra-strict kashrut rules. Alfond tackles matzo balls, and her technique would probably work on a vegan gefilte "fish." My main quibble is that Alfond's recipes are almost obsessively oil-free. If you crave the additional richness even a bit of oil can add to dishes, I would add a small amount to many of these recipes. Even a small amount of oil/fat can trick the tastebuds into thinking a dish is much richer than it actually is!
    about Beyond Chopped Liver added on March 13, 2021

  • In addition to the magisterial cookbooks by Najmieh Batmanglij, this book, by Professor M.R. Ghanoonparvar is an excellent compendium of Persian cuisine with recipes from many regions of Iran. The recipes are unfussy and straightforward, with many illustrations, so it's easy to see what the finished dish should look like. Although not to the extent that Batmanglij does, the good professor includes notes on explaining the history and cultural context of many dishes as well as menus for traditional celebrations. This is a very worthwhile addition to your cookbook library if you are interested in the varied and fascinating cuisine of Persia (Iran). This volume includes many recipes for fish dishes, pickles, and vegetable dishes, and it's worth nothing that many of the dishes including meat or dairy can easily be made vegetarian or vegan with small adaptations.
    about Persian Cuisine added on March 09, 2021

  • A beautifully illustrated volume of Anglo-Jewish recipes. Many are updated versions, so there's not as much nostalgia as advertised, but even in those recipes nods are given to the older ways of preparing the dishes. There are many Sephardi/Middle Eastern dishes that have grown in popularity in the Anglo-Jewish community in recent years as well as the more familiar Ashkenazi favorites that dominated Jewish tables in our parents' and grandparents' generation. A fine addition to your bookshelf, particularly for American cooks who can learn some variations from the way many of these foods are prepared on this side of the Atlantic.
    about Warm Bagels & Apple Strudel added on February 26, 2021

  • This is a very useful book to have on your shelf. It includes all the "big hits" of the cooking of the many ethnic communities that settled in Minnesota. The recipes are "authentic" and designed for home cooking. Communities represented range from the Ojibway, the various Scandinavian peoples, Jewish, Mexican, Greek, and more, including the more recent Hmong community. Because of the date of publication, this book misses the recipes of the more recent Somali and Sudanese communities that are also prominent now in Minnesota. Maybe a revised, updated version can include those. But this is a fine cookbook as is.
    about Minnesota Ethnic Food Book added on February 26, 2021

  • Only about 30 recipes but the book is illustrated and the recipes authentic. It seems to have been translated, clunkily, from the original Portuguese, so some of the text will seem a bit weird or obscure unless you are already familiar with Portuguese cooking and/or know some Portuguese.
    about Azorean Cuisine added on February 21, 2021

  • Lots of wonderful old-world recipes, including a number of unusual ones from the Crimean Tatars, a separate ethnic group in Ukraine that has had a long historical and cultural influence. A surprising recipe is one for what can only be described as Tatar chili con carne, made with ground meat, tomatoes, white beans, and hot chili flakes! However, the book also has many recipes for authentic borschts, vareniki and pierogi, roast stuffed ducks and geese, kasha, and more!
    about New Ukrainian Cookbook added on August 07, 2020

  • A lovely book that subtly updates and adapts Polish cooking for modern tables, lightening dishes and incorporating the occasional unexpected ingredient to give a dish a fresh taste or look.
    about Wild Honey and Rye added on July 22, 2020

  • A terrific collection of authentic Mexican recipes, creatively veganized. Many of the ingredients and techniques can be adapted to cuisines other than Mexican, so this is a particularly useful book to own if you are vegan or into plant-based cooking. One "tweak" to the recipes: the author uses lemon juice and probiotic powder as a way to sour dairy analogues like cheeses and cream and give them that cultured "tang." It's likely possible to substitute vegan lactic acid (available online) to achieve the same effect without having to wait for the cheese or cream to ferment. Try it both ways to see which you prefer.
    about Vida Verde added on May 22, 2020

  • This is more of a curiosity than a useful cookbook. It will give you an idea of the dishes eaten in American Jewish households in the 1870s, but Mrs. Levy is not a great cookbook writer. Many of the "recipes" are really her own personal memory-joggers and not complete instructions for preparing a dish. Ingredients and key steps are missing in many of the recipes, so unless you can find versions of them in other books from the period there is no way to reproduce them at home. Still, it's interesting. One surprise is that, as in British cookbooks from this period, lots of strong spices are used in savory dishes: cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, ginger, pepper, curry powder, and cayenne! By the end of the century seasonings had toned down considerably. I'm not clear what caused that shift in tastes, but by the time many of our own grandparents were born food was much blander. Or, shall we say, more subtly spiced?
    about First Jewish-American Cookbook added on May 17, 2020

  • This book is a stunner: the recipes, based on the bounty in Israel's public markets, come from the cooking traditions of Mizrahi Jews (those whose origins are in the Middle East and North Africa). For most non-Israelis the recipes will be new and original, and absolutely everything looks and sounds irresistibly delicious. Be careful not to drool on the pages!
    about Shuk added on November 15, 2019

  • Amazing book! Every recipe in it begs to be cooked right away, and the illustrations of each dish are so alluring you just want to lick the page! Most of the recipes are vegetarian and can easily be adapted to be vegan. Even the meat recipes would be easy to adapt in most cases.
    about Persiana added on September 19, 2019

  • This is an outstanding collection of American recipes, providing a very thorough snapshot of American food in the early part of the 21st century. The book is notable because it includes many popular regional dishes that are not necessarily well-known in other parts of the country (but deserve to be) and that usually aren't included in other comprehensive American cookbooks. All the usual classics are included -- the only omission I've spotted is Brunswick Stew, although its close cousin, Kentucky Bergoo, is featured. This cookbook is a terrific complement to other classic American cookbooks like "The Joy of Cooking," Fannie Farmer, "The New Doubleday Cookbook," James Beard's "American Cookery," etc.
    about America: The Cookbook added on July 19, 2019

  • Although a relatively slim volume, it successfully packs in all the "top hits" of Brazilian cookery mixed with a number of updated and innovative dishes based on traditional Brazilian ingredients and techniques. You couldn't ask for a better basic collection of Brazilian recipes.
    about Brazilian Kitchen added on August 06, 2018

  • If I'm ever sent to the firing squad, this will be the last meal I request! You'll never taste anything better! It needs a more glamorous name -- this is one of the most luxurious and delicious dishes ever invented! I've made this at home and risked substituting fake crab. Sacrilegious as it is, It came out quite well. I used large pieces that I whizzed in the food processor to make large crumbles. I also used small salad sized shrimp. (Lots of it.) You want lots of seafood in this stuffing! To cook the eggplants initially, you can use the microwave. 4 large eggplant halves took about 8 - 10 minutes to be cooked and soft enough to scoop out of the shells. To fill and serve the eggplant skins, an easy way is to put one skin in an individual sprayed oval gratin dish and then fill. Filling should be high and domed.
    about Stuffed eggplant from Leon Galatoire's Cookbook added on July 19, 2018