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Roasted chicken with clementines & arak from Jerusalem (page 179) by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi

  • whole chicken
  • fennel
  • oranges
  • clementines
  • thyme
  • fennel seeds
  • arak
  • whole grain mustard

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Notes about this recipe

  • stef on November 27, 2017

    Another yes for this wonderful dish

  • Astrid5555 on January 10, 2016

    As pointed out by all the other reviewers before, this is an amazing, company-worthy dish with very little hands-on time invloved. Can't wait to make it again!

  • WFPLCleanEating on November 13, 2015

    This a great dish when you need to do the prep ahead as it marinates for up to 24 hours then all gets tipped into a roasting pan. I loved the combination of fennel, ouzo and fennel seeds with the clementines. The anise flavor is more subtle than you would expect from 3 anise ingredients. - Jane

  • Jane on November 08, 2015

    I've been meaning to make this for ages and I don't know why it took me so long. It was so easy and the results were great. Everything is prepped ahead then left to marinate then roasted. Served with a bulghur pilaf, this is one of the best effort to results ratio meals.

  • cultus.girl on September 03, 2015

    Lovely lovely dish and had all guests raving on a cold winter's night. Don't seem to be able to get clementines where we live so substituted honey murcott mandarins which have enough body and sweetness to hold their own.

  • MmeFleiss on April 02, 2015

    6 tablespoons arak = 6 tablespoons plain vodka + 3/4 teaspoons powdered star anise.

  • PFP on April 11, 2014

    This is a wonderful dish for holidays -- I will be serving it for the Seder this year. It is easy to prepare in large quantity, can be made ahead and the slight bitterness of the charred Clementines balances the richness of the flavors and the gravy. I made it last week, put it into vacuum sealed bags -- white meat in some, dark in others -- and I will be able to rehead them in a sous vide bath so that they don't overcook. Makes serving so easy and no pots or pans to clean up.

  • Barb_N on March 25, 2014

    With another snow storm upon us at least we had sunshine looking up at us from the plate. Like TrishaCP I did not find the anise overpowering- just a side note to the citrus. I would definitely make this for company- it's delicious and beautiful.

  • Barb_N on March 25, 2014

    I have been eyeing this recipe for over a year- when I came across a bag of organic clementines, I knew it was time. No arak of course (I have sources who smuggle it in from Lebanon but not recently) so I used Sambuca. Otherwise followed recipe as written. At the 75 minute mark I removed the nicely browned chicken thighs (they were gigantic as thighs go) and left the fennel and clementines for another 30 minutes in the sauce. Only then was the fennel tender. The sauce was not thickened but was covered by an unappealing layer of fat (probably mostly the olive oil from the marinade and a bit of chicken fat). But, by now we were TIRED and ready to eat so instead of reducing said sauce I skimmed it instead and served it over the chicken and purchased Israeli couscous salad with almonds and dried cranberries with a side of golden beet salad with horseradish vinaigrette. A tasty but not quick meal.

  • twoyolks on January 13, 2014

    The best part of this was the sauce; the savory, citrus, and sweet flavors balance well together. I may have overcrowded my baking pan a bit but the chicken skin was flabby and not particularly browned. Not all of the fennel cooked all the way through. I'm still not entirely sure what the purpose of the clementines is (to eat, to add seasoning to the sauce?).

  • stockholm28 on December 31, 2013

    Very good dish. I used ouzo and a cut-up whole chicken. I don't like ouzo, but it is very subtle in this dish. If I made this again, I'd probably use all thighs as the breasts were a bit dry the next day.

  • TrishaCP on June 21, 2013

    If you eat chicken, I can highly recommend this recipe-one of those wonderful Ottolenghi flavor combinations- in this case with citrus and anise. Chicken is marinated in orange and lemon juices with any type of anise liquor- I didn't have arak so used Herbsaint, but Pernod or ouzo would work too. It is then roasted with sliced clementines (I had tangerines so that is what I used) that caramelize and taste so floral and wonderful. Fennel and fennel seeds are added too, but the final anise favor is milder than I would have guessed, so don't let that scare you off. I served with barley couscous, and the nutty sweetness was perfect with this dish.

  • purpleshiny on May 28, 2013

    This is absolutely lovely and really very easy. Used Ouzo as I couldn't find Arak locally. Served with quinoa. My sauce cooked down in the oven to the point where there was nothing to reduce - think I will add more liquid next time. I use a very dark roasting pan - I'm sure that's the reason.

  • westminstr on January 31, 2013

    One of my favorite chicken dishes ever!

  • lilham on January 30, 2013

    I found roasted unpeeled clementines bitter. So I substituted with peeled, sliced clementines. The resulting fruit is sweet and jammy. But we like our food a bit on the sweeter side.

  • Delys77 on January 09, 2013

    Pg 179 We loved this dish. The first major point in its favour is the ease of preparation. Just toss the ingredients into a bowl to marinate and then roast, with a brief reduction of sauce at the end. The flavours compliment each other very nicely, with a great balance between the anise and citrus flavours. I must admit I forgot to reduce the sauce at the end so my chicken was a little under salted, but I believe that had I reduced the sauce it would have given the chicken just the right amount of salt once it had been sauced. The other major advantage is the fact that the dish has you roast chicken and vegetables together, I added a basic israeli couscous and the meal was complete.

  • Breadcrumbs on January 08, 2013

    p. 179 Outstanding dish! It’s a pleasure to prepare, aromatic while roasting and, a sheer delight to eat. • I used 6 bone-in, skin on chicken thighs and wished I’d added more • All ingredients were combined in an extra-large (Ikea) zippered bag and marinated in the fridge for approx 8 hours. We turned the bag twice during this period. • I used ouzo • I likely reduced my sauce by half vs 1/3 as suggested. I wanted to achieve a thicker texture and was very pleased w our results. We thought this was sensational. The sauce was outstanding, citrusy w a strong fennel flavour that we absolutely love. We served this w the Mujadara and drizzled a little sauce atop of that as well. Pure heaven. Honestly.

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