Gok Cooks Chinese: Over 80 Fabulously Simple Dishes from Gok's Family Recipe Book by Gok Wan

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  • My perfect fried rice
    • Categories: Rice dishes; Side dish; Chinese
    • Ingredients: groundnut oil; dried Chinese sausages; long-grain rice; peas; water chestnuts; canned anchovies in oil; light soya sauce; spring onions
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  • Spicy stir-fried prawns with cashew nuts
    • Categories: Stocks; Stir-fries; Main course; Chinese
    • Ingredients: ginger root; king prawns; groundnut oil; garlic; spring onions; celery; red chillies; Shaoxing rice wine; light soy sauce; fish sauce; cashew nuts; sesame oil
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    • Categories: Dressings & marinades; Main course; Chinese
    • Ingredients: hoisin sauce; ginger root; whole star anise; Chinese five-spice powder; honey; pork loin
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    • Categories: Stir-fries; Side dish; Chinese
    • Ingredients: groundnut oil; red chillies; ginger root; spring onions; tinned water chestnuts; peanuts; dried shrimp; Shaoxing rice wine; French beans (haricots verts); fish sauce; light soy sauce; white pepper; sesame oil
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    • Categories: Chutneys, pickles & relishes; Sauces for meat; Main course; Chinese
    • Ingredients: broccoli; sesame oil; groundnut oil; ginger root; spring onions; fermented black beans; sirloin steaks; red chillies; white pepper; Shaoxing rice wine; light soy sauce; rice vinegar; caster sugar
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    • Categories: Quick / easy; Stir-fries; Main course; Chinese
    • Ingredients: groundnut oil; onions; eggs; white pepper; light soy sauce; fish sauce; peas; white crabmeat; spring onions; pea shoots
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    • Categories: Stir-fries; Main course; Chinese
    • Ingredients: potato flour; white pepper; chicken thighs; groundnut oil; garlic; spring onions; Shaoxing rice wine; soy sauce; caster sugar
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    • Categories: Quick / easy; Soups; Chinese
    • Ingredients: white crabmeat; creamed corn; tinned sweetcorn; light soy sauce; white pepper; sesame oil; spring onions
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    • Categories: Stir-fries; Main course; Chinese
    • Ingredients: potato flour; white pepper; sirloin steaks; groundnut oil; ginger root; spring onions; carrots; light soy sauce; caster sugar; sesame oil; rice vinegar; chilli flakes
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    • Categories: Stir-fries; Main course; Chinese
    • Ingredients: Shaoxing rice wine; light soy sauce; chicken breasts; groundnut oil; dried chillies; Sichuan peppercorns; spring onions; dark soy sauce; toasted sesame oil; peanuts; coriander leaves
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    • Categories: Sauces for fish; Stir-fries; Main course; Chinese
    • Ingredients: groundnut oil; king prawns; onions; green peppers; Shaoxing rice wine; light soy sauce; yellow bean sauce; cashew nuts
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    • Categories: Soups; Entertaining & parties; Chinese
    • Ingredients: vegetable stock; mushrooms; dried chilli flakes; light soy sauce; bamboo shoots; ginger root; rice vinegar; chives
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    • Categories: Pasta, doughs & sauces; Stir-fries; Main course; Chinese
    • Ingredients: egg noodles; sesame oil; groundnut oil; prawns; mangetout; Shaoxing rice wine; light soy sauce; dark soy sauce; white pepper; spring onions; carrots
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    • Categories: Small plates - tapas, meze; Entertaining & parties; Chinese
    • Ingredients: prawns; scallops; canned water chestnuts; white pepper; sesame oil; chives; wonton wrappers; groundnut oil; light soy sauce; chilli oil
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    • Categories: Salads; Stir-fries; Small plates - tapas, meze; Entertaining & parties; Chinese
    • Ingredients: squid; spring onions; groundnut oil; red chillies; white pepper; cucumbers; rice vinegar; caster sugar; salt
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    • Categories: Small plates - tapas, meze; Main course; Entertaining & parties; Chinese
    • Ingredients: pork ribs; black beans; ginger root; spring onions; white pepper
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    • Categories: Stuffing; Small plates - tapas, meze; Entertaining & parties; Chinese
    • Ingredients: dried lotus leaves; glutinous rice; dried shiitake mushrooms; groundnut oil; ginger root; spring onions; peanuts; dried scallops; Shaoxing rice wine; light soy sauce; fish sauce; oyster sauce; cucumbers; caster sugar; chilli oil
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    • Categories: Dips, spreads & salsas; Sauces for poultry; Small plates - tapas, meze; Entertaining & parties; Chinese
    • Ingredients: minced chicken; spring onions; leeks; ginger root; sesame oil; Shaoxing rice wine; white pepper; groundnut oil; honey; light soy sauce; chives
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    • Categories: Small plates - tapas, meze; Entertaining & parties; Chinese
    • Ingredients: minced pork; spring onions; ginger root; Shaoxing rice wine; sesame oil; fish sauce; light soy sauce; white pepper; egg yolks; prawns; gyoza wrappers; groundnut oil
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    • Categories: Stir-fries; Small plates - tapas, meze; Entertaining & parties; Chinese
    • Ingredients: king prawns; water chestnuts; toasted sesame oil; white pepper; groundnut oil; ginger root; spring onions; cucumbers; fish sauce; rice vinegar; light soy sauce; chilli oil
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    • Categories: Small plates - tapas, meze; Entertaining & parties; Chinese
    • Ingredients: minced beef; ginger root; coriander stalks; coriander leaves; Chinese five-spice powder; light soy sauce; white pepper; Shaoxing rice wine; carrots; chilli oil
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    • Categories: Rice dishes; Breakfast / brunch; Chinese
    • Ingredients: short-grain rice
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    • Categories: Egg dishes; Main course; Chinese
    • Ingredients: minced pork; ginger root; spring onions; light soy sauce; fish sauce; sesame oil; eggs; white pepper; red chillies
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    • Categories: Egg dishes; Main course; Chinese
    • Ingredients: eggs; light soy sauce; toasted sesame oil; spring onions; white pepper; tiger prawns
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    • Categories: Bread & rolls, savory; Main course; Small plates - tapas, meze; Entertaining & parties; Chinese
    • Ingredients: groundnut oil; pork tenderloin; Shaoxing rice wine; yellow bean paste; hoisin sauce; light soy sauce; plain flour; active dry yeast; caster sugar; sesame oil
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Notes about this book

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Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Braised aubergine with pork

    • helengeoghegan on December 14, 2013

      delicious & straightforward, -but hold back on the oil.

    • Ro_ on July 09, 2020

      Very nice dish, flavoursome and easy to do. The only reason I'm not favouriting this is because I know that as much as I love it, it's not really my family members' favourite sort of thing.

  • Carrot salad with sesame seeds

    • tekobo on April 01, 2017

      Super simple and super tasty. Grated the carrot and stored in fridge for a few days, adding dressing just before I served it.

    • Ro_ on May 22, 2020

      This was nice, worth doing if you have carrots to use up and want an Asian-flavoured side.

  • Lap chong and squid

    • tekobo on March 27, 2017

      Super simple to make and a lovely combination of slightly sweet sausage and soothing soft squid.

  • Aromatic wok-fried beans

    • Nancarrow on December 27, 2021

      available online here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/5pX69Fjsc04G4NlfkwrfkTn/wok-fried-beans

  • Poppa Wan's all-time favourite beef noodle soup

    • JocelynIL on October 17, 2016

      Made with thinly sliced ribeye that was on sale. Simmered less time. Use 3 not 4 tblsp rice . Careful to not add too many salty ingredients, the amount called for is good. Added mushrooms for a really rich broth. Toward the end added baby bok choy, enocki noodles, chrysanthamum leaves, a touch of seame oil and tbsp of sugar. Fabulous, fabulous.

  • Pork and radish pancake buns

    • Ro_ on November 01, 2020

      These were easy to make, and very tasty. My main issue is that they are quite large, and as such it's hard to know in what context you'd serve them - they're too big to be finger food, but don't really seem like something you'd serve on a plate with a salad or noodles or something either. For this reason if I made them again, I think I'd make 8 smaller buns rather than the 4 big ones Gok suggests, and have them as part of a dim sum.

  • Poppa Wan's show-stopping twice-cooked melting pork

    • Ro_ on November 12, 2020

      Interesting, as the previous twice-cooked-pork-belly recipes I had tried had all been served with a sauce, whereas this one is served with just a glaze, and no liquid. (I tried to use the leftover braising liquid to cook rice in, but it didn't work out that well). It was extremely tasty, I loved the various sweet notes coming from the anise, ginger and honey and the texture was definitely melty. The only issue I had was that my pork belly had some bones running through it which made slicing it in the prescribed way a bit tricky (in the end some pieces we had to eat with our hands around the bone). I'd make this again if I was serving with e.g. a saucy vegetable dish or a soup to provide some "wetness" to the meal, I don't think it would work so well just on its own with rice.

  • Poppa Wan's easy Peking duck with pancakes

    • Ro_ on June 02, 2020

      I loved the flavours of this duck, the seasoning came through really nicely. Obviously however this recipe doesn't give you the typical texture of Peking duck as served in most Chinese restaurants. I think it's a good recipe for when you want something quick and simple, but for my next attempt I will try out one of the more complicated and long recipes for a more authentic Peking duck. Also, I didn't make the plum sauce, I used a readymade hoisin that I needed to finish up. For the pancakes I used a Ken Hom recipe.

  • Poppa Wan's simple soy-glazed chicken

    • Ro_ on November 04, 2020

      I didn't have massively high hopes for this very simple recipe, but it really exceeded my expectations! We both really enjoyed the sticky glaze on the on-the-bone chicken, which was full of flavour. I even scraped up some of the leftover glaze and sediment from the wok to serve over the rice, which was very tasty. Just be careful when reducing the glaze: the instructions say to boil on a high heat for 5m with a lid on the wok, but I caught mine JUST at the point of starting to burn after about 3 minutes, so did the rest of the reduction on a lower heat with the lid off. I guess this may depend on your wok.

  • Prawn and scallop moneybag dumplings

    • Ro_ on November 01, 2020

      I didn't have water chestnuts, so chopped up some beansprouts instead and used those. I also didn't use chives to "tie" up the dumplings, they stuck together fine without them. The interesting thing about these was that they don't actually have any chinese seasonings in them, so the prawn and scallop come through unadulterated, which is perfect for seafood lovers but perhaps not exactly the taste you might expect from such a dumpling. I liked the guidance on making them in advance and then just steaming at the last minute: that's what I did and it was very handy.

  • Poppa Wan's amazing pork ribs

    • Ro_ on June 13, 2020

      The technique of steaming the ribs was new to me, but it definitely gave very tender meat. I simply lined my bamboo steamer with greaseproof paper and cooked them like that (in two stacked steamers) as I didn't have any bowls/plates the right size to fit in the steamer and accomodate a good quantity of ribs. The only problem with the steaming method is that ribs have layers of thick fat, and steamed fat isn't very appealing - some bits end up needing to be cut off so you can get to the good meat underneath. This was billed as a very light, clean-tasting dish and I'd agree with that, going so far to say as they were a bit too plain for me, I'd have liked a little more flavour.

  • Chicken and leek magic potstickers

    • Ro_ on October 25, 2020

      My first time making posticker dumplings at home, and I was quite pleased overall. The filling is nice but not the most flavourful ever, I think there's a reason why pork is a more common filling for these type of dumplings and I will probably use a pork recipe next time. For the cooking method, it worked well but I think next time I would cook them for a bit longer in the pan to get more of a crispy coating, and maybe flip them so that the sides go a bit crispy too, before adding the water and finishing with a steam.

  • Steamed beef and coriander balls

    • Ro_ on April 26, 2020

      These looked quite cool, but they tasted underwhelming. Also it's very easy to overcook the beef: mine ended up a little dried out so I'd steam for less time if I made them again...which I probably won't.

  • Char siu pork buns

    • Ro_ on October 25, 2020

      My first time making this type of dim sum - it's really hard to tell when the bun is cooked, I think I learned that it can still look kind of raw on the outside but actually be completely cooked through on the inside, so not to leave it in the steamer too long! The char siu filling and sauce was absolutely delicious. I was worried that the buns would pop open during steaming as my filling/sealing technique was not great, but actually they were fine and stayed together well. The main issue here was that my buns ended up absolutely HUGE, and I think this is because I didn't have enough plain flour so ended up having to use some self-raising flour to get the full quantity needed. I will definitely make this recipe again, with only plain flour, and a bit more knowledge about the whole process.

  • Steamed mushroom dumplings

    • Ro_ on October 25, 2020

      These went down very well in my house, I was surprised that they were probably the favourite item of all the dim sum I made, and they were also the only thing that was vegetarian - this is in a household of confirmed meat eaters! There was so much flavour in the mushroom filling, it really was delicious.

  • Ginger beef

    • Ro_ on June 18, 2020

      Ultimately, while this was perfectly nice a) it didn't taste that ginger-y and b) the attempt to replicate a crispy beef dish but lighter by just shallow-frying the beef doesn't quite work. It just made me want a proper crispy beef dish where the meat is properly deep fried.

  • Garlic chicken

    • etcjm on July 05, 2018

      Works every time. Keep chicken smaller to cook quicker. This is not a saucy dish so don't expect to have liquid to go with your rice. It is so tasy though and has become a regular. I use extra spring onions and have done the recipe with both breast and thigh. Be careful not to dry it out if you use breast. Leftovers, if there are any, are even better.

  • Prawn chow mein

    • etcjm on December 06, 2020

      Cooked this 'plain' as an addition to two other recipes. Omitted the prawns and used peas instead of mangetout (my daughter hates man-get-OUT). I can't attest to how it tastes because I can't eat egg noodles and had plain rice instead, however it went down a storm and leftovers have just been eaten for lunch. I halved the recipe. So, so easy for a dish you could any add any leftovers to. Cheap, quick - no need at all to buy take-away.

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Reviews about this book

  • Yum.Fi

    This was a pleasurable, unpretentious book that gives the total beginner (and the more experienced gastronome) many interesting recipes and a wonderful springboard to experiment further...

    Full review
  • Fuss Free Flavours

    It delivers a broad range of accessible, straightforward and seriously tasty dishes as well as some challenges for rainy days.

    Full review
  • ISBN 10 0718159519
  • ISBN 13 9780718159511
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published May 10 2012
  • Format Hardcover
  • Page Count 240
  • Language English
  • Countries United Kingdom
  • Publisher Penguin Books Ltd
  • Imprint Michael Joseph Ltd

Publishers Text

Not only is Gok Wan one of the UK's top fashion stylists, but he can cook too! Gok's fantastic new book, "Gok Cooks Chinese", contains 80 personal and family recipes, which are not only delicious and healthy but incredibly simple to make. His love and passion for Chinese food and cooking techniques shine through from every page. From his unique perspective he gives us his personal and modern take on the Chinese food that he grew up eating, drawing on his Chinese heritage to give us a different angle on how to eat - for Gok, it's all about sitting down, tucking into fantastic food that is fuss-free and relaxed. Gok's food is about balance, health, flavour and fun. From his absolute favourite recipe for Prawn Wonton Noodle Soup (which he calls 'happiness in a bowl') to Perfect Fried Rice or classics like his dad's Honey-glazed Char Siu Pork, through chapters on Dim Sum, Street Food, One Pot Wonders and Feasting, you will find recipes for all occasions and moods, whether entertaining friends or enjoying a meal at home by yourself. Above all, Gok Wan will demystify Chinese ingredients and equipment. "Gok Cooks Chinese" shows us how easy it is to shop and cook just like him. Thanks to the overwhelming success of his "Channel 4" series, "How To Look Good Naked", acclaimed fashion stylist and on-screen consultant, Gok Wan, is now an institution on our screens. Not only has Gok appeared in a further six series, he has also hosted three of "Gok's Fashion Fix" and the follow-on, "Gok's Clothes Roadshow", is into its second series. Gok has also made a moving documentary on child obesity, "Too Fat Too Young", and explored the modern day issues our teenagers are facing in "Gok's Teens: The Naked Truth". He has written four books, including his bestselling autobiography, "Through Thick and Thin". His women's wear collection for Sainsbury's broke UK sales records upon its release in October 2011, allowing women up and down the country to fulfill their dreams and get well and truly Gok'd.

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