Brassicas: Cooking the World's Healthiest Vegetables: Kale, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts and More by Laura B. Russell

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Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Roasted broccolini with winey mushrooms

    • lorloff on October 30, 2016

      Great dish we made it with roasted broccoli from the farmer's market and wild mushrooms it was very good.

    • julesamomof2 on April 27, 2020

      This is one of those 'why didn't I think of that' recipes that will be made again and again. The winey mushrooms with a sprinkling of parm elevated it from just plain roasted broccolini.

  • Mizuna salad with cumin-roasted cauliflower

    • Astrid5555 on September 09, 2014

      Used baby arugula as per substitution suggestion. Be careful to ensure that the cauliflower is tender but not mushy. Great with the additional sweetness from the dates!

  • Indian potato and cauliflower curry

    • Astrid5555 on October 01, 2014

      A nice and easy curry. Next time however, I would leave out the part where you cook the potatoes and cauliflower just in oil without any liquid and wait until they soften, which takes ages and not the suggested 6 to 8 minutes. On top 2 tbs water added after they start to soften is not enough liquid to simmer the vegetables until they are tender.

  • Roasted Brussels sprouts with Parmesan crust

    • Astrid5555 on December 25, 2014

      Roasting Brussles sprouts in the oven is a true revelation and with the added Parmesan cheese this recipe is incredibly delicious! This will be the only way how I will cook Brussels sprouts from now on!

    • Lepa on December 21, 2016

      I mostly liked this and the timing was just right BUT my husband complained about the vinegar taste. I used basalmic. I might reduce the amount next time, if I make it again.

    • AllegraLeigh on December 26, 2016

      Made these for Christmas dinner and they were delicious...huge hit. Easy! I used balsamic vinegar and drizzled at the end with balsamic reduction. Seriously yum.

    • Christinalego on January 12, 2021

      Great! Def do again.

  • Sautéed spring turnips with their greens

    • meggan on May 14, 2020

      Fine- nothing to write home about.

  • Chinese broccoli with ginger and oyster sauce

    • meggan on October 01, 2020

      Lovely and simple.

  • Romanesco summer salad

    • hillsboroks on July 14, 2020

      We really enjoyed this salad. Even though I realized at the last minute that I didn't have a red pepper, it turned very tasty. This was a great way to use that strange looking vegetable that came in the CSA box.

  • Keralan-style Brussels sprouts

    • swegener on March 08, 2015

      This was very surprising--I loved the flavor combination. I never would have thought of such a coconut heavy brussels sprout dish. I did add some ginger because I had a ton of it.

  • Lemony broccoli chop

    • sirimaria on December 09, 2015

      Easy to make and it was delicious even though I used frozen broccoli.

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Reviews about this book

  • Boston Globe by T. Susan Chang

    There’s one for every table and every occasion, and this book goes a long way toward easing these healthful greens onto the menu throughout the year.

    Full review
  • Food52

    Q & A with author Laura Russell

    Full review
  • ISBN 10 1607745712
  • ISBN 13 9781607745716
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Apr 10 2014
  • Format Hardcover
  • Page Count 176
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Ten Speed Press
  • Imprint Ten Speed Press

Publishers Text

A cookbook showcasing 80 recipes for the most popular of the world's healthiest vegetables--kale, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, leafy greens, and more--tailored to accommodate special diets such as gluten-free, dairy-free, vegetarian, and vegan.

For a long time, brassicas had a mixed reputation. While a small group of people staunchly adored them, most Americans were not as fond of the vegetables formerly known as "cruciferous" (who doesn't remember a plate of stinky boiled cabbage or President Bush's condemnation of broccoli?). But in recent years, a transformation has occurred. Kale has taken the world by storm and there's hardly a restaurant left that doesn't have cauliflower on the menu. The rising popularity of brassicas is not only due to their extraordinary health benefits and "superfood" status, but also the realization that they can taste delicious when properly prepared. Brassicas shows home cooks how to bring out the flavors of these vegetables without death-by-boiling or burial under a blanket of cheese. When roasted, Brussels sprouts reveal an inherent sweetness. Watercress and arugula add a delightful peppery punch to salads. Caramelizing cauliflower in the sauté pan brings out its best attributes. Celebrating natural flavors rather than masking them, Brassicas both inspires cooks as well as arms them with appetizing new ways to increase their vegetable consumption.



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