Forgotten Skills of Cooking: The Time-Honoured Ways Are the Best: Over 700 Recipes Show You Why by Darina Allen

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Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Onion jam

    • alicemb on November 17, 2017

      Good recipe, nice colour and taste

  • Spaghetti with wild garlic and herbs

    • Astrid5555 on April 15, 2018

      Delicious way to use up my abundance of wild garlic. Very quick to make!

  • Pheasant braised with Cork gin

    • saladdays on February 15, 2014

      A very good recipe which produces a tasty moist pheasant, much better than roasting which means dry meat. Used London Gin rather than Cork, we're not in Ireland! Felt it was just a bit short on liquid for the sauce, next time would add some water or stock as well as the gin and the white wine.

  • Osso bucco alla Milanese

    • saladdays on September 29, 2019

      Haven't cooked osso bucco for ages as it's not often available but this was an easy recipe and absolutely delicious. Cooked it long and slow in a Rayburn oven and served with mashed potatoes, the veal was falling off the bone and very tender.

    • dvajefink on October 29, 2011

      Easy to make, great flavors,served over spinach fettuccine.

  • Mummy's brown soda bread

    • Melanie on March 09, 2014

      Easy and worked well - uses half/half mixture of plain and wholemeal flour which tastes good.

  • Colcannon

    • Melanie on March 09, 2014

      Yum! I used savoy cabbage however the recipe also suggests substituting spring cabbage or kale. Recipe instructs you to use shallots however these are not mentioned in the book's ingredients list and I didn't end up using any.

  • Roasted beets

    • Melanie on March 09, 2014

      Very simple recipe however it's a good reminder to roast beetroot in foil (and rub the skins off later) - keeps them nice and juicy.

  • Beet tops

    • Melanie on March 09, 2014

      Tasty. However, I think I prefer Gwyneth Paltrow's Beet Greens Soup as a way of using up the greens.

  • Seville whole orange marmalade

    • Melanie on August 23, 2014

      I made a half batch of this marmalade, reducing the sugar as I used sweet oranges. This recipe worked really well and was very straight forward - boil oranges, cut and return to pot and then reduce before adding warmed sugar. I ended up warming the sugar up in the microwave - as I was using a reduced quantity it seemed like the easiest approach. I didn't have any muslin and simply left the pips in while boiling, they ended up breaking up so were okay for eating at home. The ginger marmalade variation sounds interesting, might try next time.

  • Bitter orange marmalade

    • Melanie on March 09, 2014

      I had a bit of a disaster with this recipe however still managed to save most of it - the issues I experienced were probably because I made a smaller batch. The water boiled through very quickly during the initial cooking time and I noticed as the bottom of the pan started catching / burning and smoking! However, the taste was still good and I would try and make again, but would pay much closer attention.

  • Fluffy lemon pudding

    • Melanie on June 21, 2014

      Yum. I was a bit worried about my batter (butter was very cold so didn't cream too successfully) but it all worked out well in the end. We didn't dust icing sugar over the top as it was already quite sweet but probably would for presentation purposes if we had guests.

  • Beginner's brown soda bread

    • Melanie on March 09, 2014

      Another easy soda bread - this one had more flavour than Mummy's Brown Soda Bread due to the addition of honey (can substitute with treacle or brown sugar) and the optional seeds (I used sunflower).

  • Pickled peaches

    • Melanie on March 29, 2014

      Very easy and the results taste great. I made half a batch using peaches (the recipe suggests nectarines can be substituted). I thought there would be issues as the method doesn't require you to peel the peaches however everything seemed to stay intact (I used clingstone peaches, not sure if that would have made a difference). I made the stock syrup in a large saucepan and allowed it to cool before adding the rest of the ingredients and then bringing to a boil before reducing to a simmer on the stove top (instead of in the oven as recipe suggests).

  • Calves' livers with caramelized onion

    • jenmacgregor18 on January 23, 2015

      turned out perfect - served with champ & lots of onions fried in butter.

  • Wild blackberry and rose petal sponge cake

    • Barb_N on July 23, 2017

      P 37 in the Foraging chapter as a 'not recipe' - variation on Mrs. Lamb's Layer Cake p. 526. Add whipped cream, blackberries and candied rose petals.

    • lilyrose63 on July 22, 2017

      Impossible to find in the book. Looked under every conceivable word.

  • Hake with tomatoes and Swiss chard

  • Florence Bowe's "crumpets"

    • Mick_P on November 07, 2015

      Appears on p580 of the 2009 edition.

  • Paprika sausages

    • meginyeg on January 13, 2021

      Loved these. I used a combination of hot Hungarian paprika, regular paprika, and smoked paprika.

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Reviews about this book

  • Food52 by Francis Lam

    The 2011 Piglet Tournament of Cookbooks vs. Dorie Greenspan's Around My French Table

    Full review
  • Fine Cooking

    Allen is an astounding teacher, and her enthusiasm for good things and old-fashioned thriftiness is impossible to resist.

    Full review
  • ISBN 10 1856267881
  • ISBN 13 9781856267885
  • Published Nov 12 2009
  • Format Hardcover
  • Page Count 600
  • Language English
  • Countries United Kingdom

Publishers Text

In this much-needed new book, Darina reconnects you with the cooking skills that missed a generation or two. The book is divided into chapters such as 'Dairy', 'Fish', 'Bread' and 'Preserving' and forgotten processes such as smoking mackerel, curing bacon and making yogurt and butter are explained in the simplest terms. The delicious recipes show you how to use your homemade produce to its best, and include ideas for using forgotten cut of meat, baking bread and cakes and even eating food from the wild. The 'Vegetables and Herbs' chapter is stuffed with growing tips to satisfy even those with the smallest garden plot or window box, and there are plenty of suggestions for using gluts of vegetables. You'll even discover how to keep a few chickens in the garden. With over 700 recipes, this is the definitive modern guide to traditional cookery skills.

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