x

Welcome to Eat Your Books!

If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs.

Become a member and you can create your own personal ‘Bookshelf’. Imagine having a single searchable index of all your recipes – both digital and print!

The French Market Cookbook: Vegetarian Recipes from My Parisian Kitchen by Clotilde Dusoulier

Search this book for Recipes »

Notes about this book

This book does not currently have any notes.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Avocado and radish mini tartines (Mini tartines radis et avocat)

    • annapanna on August 30, 2013

      The recipe is very simple and it only took 10 minutes to make these but the result was excellent. The tray with the tartines looked really pretty too. Good idea for an appetizer when you don't have a lot of time.

    • Rutabaga on January 26, 2017

      With "avocado toast" everywhere, these aren't anything unexpected, but the combination of avocado and radish with a hint of cumin is a very good one - and easy, too.

  • Very green salad (Salade toute verte)

    • Rutabaga on January 30, 2017

      I was disappointed with how little flavor this salad had. Maybe this is the sort of dish you should only make with the freshest possible ingredients. As it is, I left out the asparagus since it is out of season, but otherwise followed the recipe as stated. I feel like the dressing really got lost here; maybe it just wasn't enough. Despite my disappointment, I'd like to try this in the spring with farm fresh lettuce, peas, and asparagus, and double the amount of dressing for more flavor. I would also add some finely chopped shallot the dressing or some large shaving of parmesan for a flavor boost. Hopefully that will give it the taste I'm craving.

  • Radish-top pasta (Pâtes aux fanes de radis)

    • Rutabaga on June 12, 2017

      It's nice to find a way to use radish tops, but on its own this dish is a little bland. To be fair, I only had one rather large bunch of radishes, so it would have been tastier with more. I also made the mistake of chopping the leaves to finely; leaving them almost whole would lead to a more dynamic dish.

  • Asparagus buckwheat tart (Tarte asperge et sarrasin)

    • Zosia on May 22, 2014

      This tart had great flavours and textures. I loved the dual treatment of the asparagus: roasted and in a crisp and lemony raw salad topping. The buckwheat crust complemented the fried onions and asparagus well. I found that both the roasted asparagus and the crust took less time to bake (15 and 20 minutes respectively) than suggested in the recipe.

  • Shaved fennel salad with preserved lemon (Salade de fenouil cru au citron confit)

    • bwehner on September 26, 2013

      Super easy

  • Green bean, red rice, and almond salad (Salade de haricot verts, riz rouge et amandes)

    • Emily Hope on July 18, 2013

      Used black Japonica rice, and it turned out pretty well (though the rice was a bit chewy)--a nice healthy weeknight main course salad. I used basil instead of parsley, and think I might prefer it that way. Also added in some shaved pecorino, as I felt like it was missing a savory, salty note. Served with a cold cucumber yogurt soup.

    • dawndm99 on July 01, 2017

      I used sprouted red rice - cooked in rice cooker. Added additional citrus to dressing, lime and lime zest as well as lemon juice. Thinned dressing, as needed with hot water. Added a splash of siracha to dressing. Added some red "green onions" to salad. Garnished with Aleppo pepper. Served on bed of greens splashed with rice wine vinegar. Left out parsley, cilantro would have worked with the Thai theme. Awesome!

  • Chickpea galette (Socca)

    • Zosia on March 04, 2014

      Easy to make and really very tasty especially topped with the sprinkling of black pepper the author refers to in the headnotes. Mine were thinner than the recipe intended since my pan was larger (30cm), so baking time was only 9 minutes with another minute under the broiler.

  • Tomato mustard tart (Tarte tomate et mostarde)

    • vickster on July 14, 2017

      Easy, quick to make, tart. But next time I will use a different tart shell recipe because the pastry came out tough.

  • Corsican bell pepper stew (Pebronata)

    • TrishaCP on September 14, 2013

      Red bell peppers are slowly braised with caramelized red onions, tomatoes, garlic and some unusual spices. (Rosemary and juniper berries- which were subtle in flavor, adding a bit of piney flavor, but in a good way.) Though Clotilde calls it a stew, it is really not a stand alone dish- it needs to be served with an assertive grain (I used whole wheat couscous) or a protein (didn't try eggs, but I think they would work well). Also, her cooking times are going to leave you with fairly firm pepper pieces. Just up the cooking time if that is a problem for you.

  • Ratatouille tian (Tian ratatouille)

    • mjes on May 04, 2018

      This is a simple tian recipe using pre-mixed herbes de Provence rather than seeking out fresh herbs. It does have the unexpected addition of sage; I was suspicious but one bite made me a convert. I prefer to use Japanese eggplant here as it keeps the slices of similar size for filling the dish. I am more familiar with ratatouilles that have garlic and bell peppers (and maybe fennel), but this simple recipe is so good that I'm glad to call it ratatouille.

  • Pebronata canéles (Canéles à la pebronata)

    • Cotonqueen on June 24, 2015

      Excellent! Only savory canele I have seen. I used half the pebronate recipe and mixed that with the canele part. Made 14 regular silicone mold size canele. Inhaled by my guests. I used the other half of the pebronata as a base for a cioppino like stew. Added a 28 oz can fire roasted tomatoes, 14 quahogs, i lb mussels, 1/2 lb scallops, 1/2 lb haddock. Excellent combination.

  • Peach, almond, and cardamom clafoutis (Clafoutis de pêches, amande et cardamome)

    • chawkins on August 23, 2014

      Peachy, light, not too sweet and very easy to put together. Love the cardamom. Did need a few minutes longer in the oven to get the center set.

  • Shocking pink pasta (Pâtes rose vif)

    • cilantrolime on October 09, 2014

      I substitute soy milk for cream, sunflower seeds for almond, and cilantro for parsley. Came out great. Easy too.

  • Pear and chestnut cake (Fondant poire et châtaigne)

    • TrishaCP on October 27, 2013

      I really liked the combination of chestnut flour and pears, and I also liked that this recipe was heavy on the fruit- with just enough batter to coat the pears. However, keep an eye on the cooking time- the color of the chestnut flour can make the cake appear closer to being done than it may actually be and following the recipe time, the center of my cake came out raw.

    • Zosia on November 25, 2013

      Fantastic cake with a nice texture and amazing flavour. But, this is the second thing I've baked from this book - the peach clafoutis was the first - where I found the baking time to be way off. The cake needed an additional 20 minutes in the oven before it was done. Make sure when you test for doneness with a knife that you're going through batter and not just piercing pieces of fruit.

    • RosieB on September 28, 2014

      I recently made this cake as a desert for a French inspired dinner party and it was beautiful. The chestnut flour give the cake a really interesting flavor with the pears. I served it with a walnut praline ice cream which complimented the cake perfectly.

    • DKennedy on December 28, 2014

      I am coming back to amend my review of this cake to make a point of saying the timing for this cake is way off. Probably the measurements too. To be fair, I subbed GF flour for the ap flour so that might have had some impact. I took it out of the oven after 40 minutes and it looked done. I put the stick in in several places and it appeared clean but on closer inspection, it was still raw throughout. I let it cool for 40 minutes and popped it out of the pan. That is when I realized it wasn't cooked through. Put it back in, this time on a sheet pan. I baked it, and baked it, but it never fully cooked through. Pity b/cuz this is a lovely cake with an ethereal quality, an, I can't quite put my finger on it quality, owing to the chestnut flour. Try cutting down on the yogurt next time or using greek yogurt?

  • Assorted savory puffs (Gougères assorties)

    • Rutabaga on January 01, 2017

      These were great fresh from the oven, but unfortunately they really softened up after sitting around for a couple or hours. That, I suppose, is partly just the nature of choux pastry, but I wonder if I had frozen the puffs after baking them (I baked them a day ahead), before popping them back in the oven to reheat for serving, if that would have helped them stay crispier.

  • French endive, orange, and walnut salad (Salade d'endives à l'orange et aux noix)

    • Delys77 on February 04, 2016

      As much as I have tried I simply don't like endive.

  • Mushroom and chive quiche (Quiche au champignons à la ciboulette)

    • Delys77 on February 04, 2016

      There is a ridiculous amount of paprika in this. The result is an orange quiche.

  • Lentil croquettes (Croquettes de lentilles)

    • DKennedy on December 11, 2014

      Made these using TJ's pre-cooked lentils. The balls did not come together easily but once formed they toasted up nicely in the oven and held up well. They were dry and somewhat bland on their own, but served warm with duck confit over an arugula salad, they offered a nice contrast to the rest of the ingredients. Good, but I'm not sure I would make them again.

  • Yogurt tart dough (Pâte à tarte au yogurt)

    • Zosia on May 22, 2014

      I was quite concerned that the olive oil and buckwheat variation of this recipe was too soft and moist to work with even after refrigeration. A light dusting of flour on parchment was all it took to roll out beautifully. It baked up crisp and golden with an earthy flavour and a slight tang....it would make great crackers. I used it for the Asparagus Buckwheat Tart (page 40).

    • amandacooks on January 17, 2017

      I really love this tart dough. It is tender and has a slight tang from the yogurt. This recipe has become by go-to for savory tarts and quiches. I like to make it with olive oil and substitute white whole wheat flour for some of the AP flour (in approximately the same ratio as the buckwheat variation); the whole wheat flour gives it a pleasant nutty flavor. The dough comes together quickly with a dough whisk and rolls out easily. I'd like to try the butter version the next time I make a dessert tart.

  • Olive oil tart dough (Pâte à tarte à l'huile d'olive)

    • vickster on July 14, 2017

      This dough came out tough and wasn't very tasty. It may have been me, but most tart dough recipes I try are much better. It is healthier, though, with only 1/4 cup olive oil. But I probably won't make again.

  • Harissa

    • swegener on February 08, 2015

      I think I like this better than the last recipe I used--though I doubled the amount of spices and added some cinnamon.

You must Create an Account or Sign In to add a note to this book.

Reviews about this book

  • Chocolate & Zucchini

    I celebrate the love story between French cuisine and vegetables, with my most vibrant seasonal recipes and lots of tips to grow your skills in your kitchen. (Also: my best-selling book!)

    Full review
  • Chocolate & Zucchini

    Author announces sale ($1.99 f0r digital edition) and talks about her book.

    Full review
  • Oregonian

    There are beautiful photos showing almost every dish in the book; the recipe headnotes filled with the personal stories behind them, almost making you feel like you're at a Parisian cafe.

    Full review
  • Tasting Table

    The recipe notes possess Dusoulier's charming--but not condescending--Parisian tone, making us wish we were baking a tomato-mustard tart or shaving fennel for a salad in a Marais kitchen, like her.

    Full review
  • Oprah.com

    ...while "healthy French food" may sound like an oxymoron... [she] promises veggies don't have to be doused in cream or mixed with a pile of pasta to taste delicious.

    Full review
  • Amateur Gourmet by Adam Roberts

    A wide ranging recorded conversation with Clotilde.

    Full review
  • Slate

    It is clever, and it is ambitious but deliberately unfancy... It is vegetarian and seasonal, and so you open it expecting to have seen it all before, but you keep being surprised.

    Full review
  • The Kitchn

    From dishes inspired by traditional regional cooking to newer twists, everything feels fresh, colorful, and special without being overly complicated.

    Full review
  • Boston Globe by T. Susan Chang

    ...as a resident of Paris...she loves vegetables in that romantic, no-holds-barred way that’s not surprising to encounter among those who live around well-stocked urban farmers’ markets.

    Full review
  • Serious Eats

    ...is not a heavy-handed cheese-filled book. Many of the dishes go light on the dairy, but even the rich ones are full of bold flavors and bright colors.

    Full review

Reviews about Recipes in this Book

  • ISBN 10 0307984826
  • ISBN 13 9780307984821
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Jul 02 2013
  • Format Paperback
  • Page Count 224
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Random House USA Inc
  • Imprint Clarkson Potter

Publishers Text

Cook from the farmer’s market with inspired vegetarian recipes—many of which are gluten-free and dairy-free—with a French twist, all highlighting seasonal produce.

Beloved ChocolateAndZucchini.com food blogger Clotilde Dusoulier is not a vegetarian. But she has, like many of us, chosen to eat less meat and fish, and is always looking for new ways to cook what looks best at the market. In The French Market Cookbook, she takes us through the seasons in 82 recipes—and explores the love story between French cuisine and vegetables.

Choosing what’s ripe and in season means Clotilde does not rely heavily on the cheese, cream, and pastas that often overpopulate vegetarian recipes. Instead she lets the bright flavors of the vegetables shine through: carrots are lightly spiced with star anise and vanilla in a soup made with almond milk; tomatoes are jazzed up by mustard in a gorgeous tart; winter squash stars in golden Corsican turnovers; and luscious peaches bake in a cardamom-scented custard. With 75 color photographs of the tempting dishes and the abundant markets of Paris, and with Clotilde’s charming stories of shopping and cooking in France, The French Market Cookbook is a transportive and beautiful cookbook for food lovers everywhere.



Other cookbooks by this author