Louisiana Real & Rustic by Emeril Lagasse and Marcelle Bienvenu

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  • Crispy-fried redfish

    • Breadcrumbs on April 25, 2013

      p. 123 - Truly scrumptious pan-fried fish recipe that was a bit of a revelation. Normally I dust fish w seasoned flour for pan-frying but Emeril has you dust w flour then dip in egg then back in the flour again. The result is a light, subtly seasoned crispy crust that almost shatters like glass under the weight of your fork. I used fresh perch from Hooked. A favourite recipe that will now become a standard. Photos here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/899414#8038008

  • Shrimp and okra gumbo

    • PennyG on November 03, 2013

      This is a great, light gumbo. Nice way to use some okra. I sometimes make it without the shrimp, then take it for lunch and add "salad shrimp" when I'm warming it up.

  • Great chicken salad

    • okcook on May 19, 2015

      This is delicious. I had made some Creole mustard so of course used that. We just had it on the side of a green salad and a quiona/corn side.

  • Egg salad

    • nicolepellegrini on August 11, 2019

      No fuss no muss just a darn good classic egg salad recipe, should you need one.

  • Southern greens

    • nicolepellegrini on November 08, 2015

      Excellent. I've been wanting to learn to make Southern-style greens properly for ages and this was just what I was looking for.

  • Rabbit gumbo

    • nicolepellegrini on November 15, 2014

      Easy, flavorful, but - I think something is way off in the amount of water called for in preparing the gumbo (3 quarts.) Not only would that not fit in most cast iron pans as called for but it would result in a seriously watery gumbo. I only used 1 quart and it was completely sufficient, especially with the 1 hour cooking time.

  • Steak in Creole mustard sauce

    • nicolepellegrini on November 08, 2015

      Pretty good for a change of pace from typical grilled rib eye steaks. I didn't have bones to make the veal stock so I just used some freshly made vegetable stock instead. Meat was very tender; be careful not to overcook if using thinner steaks.

  • Round steaks and onions

    • nicolepellegrini on July 03, 2018

      This had a very homey, familiar taste—like something I could have seen my grandmother making with a tougher, cheaper cut of steak to give it some flavor and tenderness, but nothing too fancy. If anything I think it would be better using some stock instead of just water for the slow simmering.

  • Turkey bone gumbo

    • cafespice on October 16, 2011

      Need stock

    • chawkins on December 16, 2012

      Excellent gumbo. I followed the recipe to a T with the exception of the roux, I just could not for the life of me, sorry Emeril, put a cup and couple of tablespoons of oil in my gumbo, so I just made a roux with about a quarter cup of oil and the gumbo was plenty thick after simmering uncovered for three hours.

  • Cedar plank trout

    • slimmer on April 19, 2014

      I used this with red trout, so it will work with salmon as well. Cooked it in the oven at 400 F on a sheet pan lined with foil. Skin didn't crisp up, but no worries because my dogs like the skin cooked any old way.

  • Daube glacée

    • mjes on August 28, 2021

      I cut the recipe in half and still felt it was a large recipe. I nearly didn't make the drive to find veal but am glad I did -- it helps that the beef and veal roasts contrast. I made the recipe to share with a friend who loves to mock aspics. This changed her opinion -- aspics can be delightful in texture and taste.

  • Shrimp and ham jambalaya

    • Baxter850 on April 23, 2020

      I may have messed this one up, but one cup of rice seemed insufficient with all the meat, so I added another 1.5 cups. The recipe does not call for the addition of any water/stock, which appears to be an error. Needs a 2:1 ratio of water to rice.

  • Crawfish pie

    • Baxter850 on January 18, 2018

      Nice flavor but the filling was soupy and the crust was soggy. Granted, I used a store bought crust, but it nor the recipe said to bake it before use.

  • Spiced butter cookies

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  • ISBN 10 0688127215
  • ISBN 13 9780688127213
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Sep 12 1996
  • Format Hardcover
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher HarperCollins Publishers Inc
  • Imprint William Morrow

Publishers Text

Nowhere else have I found the passion for flavor that encompasses the lives of Louisianians, day in and day out, writes Emeril Lagasse. In Louisiana Real & Rustic , the prize winning New Orleans chef, cookbook author, and television cooking personality presents the great dishes of his adopted state in 150 down-home recipes--authentic versions of some of Americas favorite regional dishes, gathered from generations of Louisiana cooks. Fricassees, itouffies and grillades, meat pies and oyster fries, red beans and rice, and jambalayas and gumbos in endless, mouthwatering variety--each recipe is spiced with the unabashed joy of cooking and eating that makes every Louisiana meal a feast.

On a delicious tour of back roads and bayous, from country cabins in Acadia to the refined town houses of Creole aristocracy, Emeril, accompanied by co-author Marcelle Bienvenu, finds that Louisiana is more than a geographical state--it's a culinary state of grace.

Louisiana's colorful history has made it an extraordinary culinary crossroads, where the cooking customs of France, Spain, Africa, and the Caribbean meld into a unique New World Cuisine. In charming tales and tempting recipes, Emeril traces the roots of Creole and Acadian (or Cajun) dishes, and honors the pioneer cooks who blended traditional tastes and techniques with the region's native ingredients. He shows how gumbos can use French roux, African okra, or fili from the indigenous Indians and he features Chicken and Oyster, Duck and Wild Mushroom, Shrimp and Okra, and Rabbit, or even collards, kale, mustard, and turnips. Emeril's explorations reveal that the spirit of culinary improvisation still thrives today. Nowhere else have I found the passion for flavor that encompasses the lives of Louisianians, day in and day out, writes Emeril Lagasse. In Louisiana Real & Rustic, the prize winning New Orleans chef, cookbook author, and television cooking personality presents the great dishes of his adopted state in 150 down-home recipes--authentic versions of some of Americas favorite regional dishes, gathered from generations of Louisiana cooks. Fricassees, itouffies and grillades, meat pies and oyster fries, red beans and rice, and jambalayas and gumbos in endless, mouthwatering variety--each recipe is spiced with the unabashed joy of cooking and eating that makes every Louisiana meal a feast.



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