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Salt Sugar Smoke: How to Preserve Fruit, Vegetables, Meat, and Fish by Diana Henry

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Notes about this book

  • Vanessa888 on September 12, 2014

    Love this book. I have a few books on preserving and this is by far the most original and interesting.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Raspberry and violet jam

    • hillsboroks on June 21, 2014

      This is the most amazing raspberry jam I have ever made! I used fresh picked raspberries from the backyard and weighed out 3 lbs per the recipe along with the other ingredients called for and ended up with 7 half pint jars of heavenly jam. I hesitated to boil it just one minute after adding the sugar so I went for 2 minutes hard boil time and the jam set up just right. The violet liqueur does something magical to the flavor of the raspberries. It intensifies the raspberries but does not give a recognizable violet flavor to the jam. If you didn't tell someone you put the violet liqueur in the jam, I doubt if they would notice it but would just think you had used fantastic raspberries. This is going into my file of recipes to make again and again. PS I just made some strawberry jam using berries from a farm stand that weren't as sweet and flavorful as I had hoped they would be. I added violet liqueur to this batch of jam and it worked its magic on the strawberries too.

  • Greengage and Gewürztraminer jam

    • sharifah on November 26, 2018

      I’ve made this jam twice now; and I think this is my most favourite jam ever. :-) I made this summer last year...it was nice. I made a double batch this year and I think I’ve aced it! It’s slightly runny, soft set because of the alcohol quantity that’s added at the end. It also depends on the ripeness of the greengage. I eat this with toast, ice cream, yogurt, porridge, and even on its own by the spoonful! Delicious!

    • veronicafrance on August 05, 2015

      I substituted Muscat for the Gewurtztraminer and this probably wasn't a great idea -- I felt the end result was too sweet (I know this is a bit silly when talking about jam). I like the greengage, orange and walnut jam better.

  • Apricot and lavender jam

    • eeeve on December 14, 2015

      I made this in September with our own Victoria plums. I was a bit afraid to use too much of the lavender, to avoid a "medicinal taste", so only used about half or two thirds of the stated amount. Now the lavender is hardly noticeable, only the bits with actual lavender buds taste of it. Nonetheless, it's a nice tasting (and nice looking - the colour is gorgeous) jam.

    • e_ballad on November 01, 2016

      Under no circumstance should you deviate from the quantity of lavender stated in this recipe. My lavender buds were on the small side so I threw in a bit more. Learn from my mistake: don't do that! When I made the recipe the 2nd time, this jam was beautiful.

  • Apricot and vanilla jam

    • veronicafrance on August 18, 2013

      Perfection. Pretty standard method: although she says to use "jam sugar" (with added pectin), I didn't, because I've never needed to do that with apricot jam before. It set quickly (soft French set) -- only about 5 minutes' boiling needed. This quantity makes just 3 standard jars.

  • Plum, orange and cardamom jam

    • sjwill82 on September 20, 2017

      Fantastic tasting jam. I made a few modifications- I did not have thin skinned oranges as recommended so after softening my quartered slices I removed around half of them after squeezing the remaining juice out. I was worried that it was going to be too bitter! I cooked to just below setting point to give a soft set jam that I like. The result was an usual flavor. Already used in a Victoria sponge cake spiked with orange zest which was very popular!

  • Nick's 'good morning' breakfast marmalade

    • rodillagra on February 02, 2015

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/recipes/8219796/Good-morning-breakfast-marmalade-recipe.html

  • Raj nimboo curd

    • Zosia on November 25, 2014

      Very silky, rich lime curd thanks to all the butter and egg yolks with a good balance of sweet:tart and excellent lime flavour. I cooked it over direct heat in half the time, used 140g fresh lime juice and reduced the butter to 113g. Very good but I prefer a "leaner" curd.

  • West Indian hot pepper sauce

    • Foodycat on October 27, 2014

      Makes about twice the quantity that the recipe says. Very nice hot sauce, quite tangy, not as fruity as I had anticipated.

  • Chinese-style plum sauce

    • Barb_N on September 04, 2014

      I made this with tiny plums from my local market- thus more labor intensive but delicious. I served this with Pork chops with plums and Chinese spices from Pure Simple Cooking. This has more layers of flavor than restaurant plum sauce- a bit saltier for example. Well worth the effort.

  • Tapenade

    • JFM on July 15, 2014

      Gorgeous. I made it with olives that I stoned myself. The stall holder where I bought the olives asked if I was bored...stoning olives myself. But it was worth it!

  • Persian marinated olives

    • JFM on June 26, 2013

      Really the best marinated olives I've ever tasted. Will certainly make again. 22.6.2013

  • Oven-dried tomatoes

    • jameswm on September 28, 2014

      I found these quite vinegary - this was using white wine vinegar

  • Apricot spoon sweet

    • eeeve on October 03, 2015

      I made this with small round yellow plums, not apricots, but found they just fell apart on cooking; therefore the end result is more like a very sweet compote. Which is actually utterly delicious, especially spooned over Greek yoghurt.

  • Chilli vodka (Pertsovka)

    • eeeve on April 02, 2016

      The bright red chilli floating in the clear vodka looked fantastic initially, and it made the vodka very spicy pretty much immediately. Now all the colour has leached out of the fruit, which is now a pale creamy colour and looks like - according to the husband - a dead man's finger. The vodka has now also got an unpleasant "planty" aftertaste. Should have taken the chilli out much sooner - one or two months should suffice!

  • Maple-brined pork chops with pear and juniper relish

    • hillsboroks on July 10, 2014

      I made these for last night's dinner and although it took a bit of planning ahead they were definitely worth it. I made up the brine in the morning and put the pork chops in it before heading to work. When I got home I made the pear and juniper relish and then browned the pork and put it into the oven. A friend who stopped by for a minute was nearly swooning over the luscious aroma of the relish. The finished dish was a bit saltier than we like but I think if I do a better job of rinsing off the brine next time that won't be a problem. This is something I will make again and would make for company too.

    • debkellie on February 20, 2013

      This is really worth trying!

  • Beetroot-cured gravlax

    • rodillagra on January 11, 2015

      http://www.foodrepublic.com/2012/12/05/beet-cured-gravlax-recipe

  • Sweet and sour apple salad

    • hillsboroks on November 05, 2014

      Such simple a salad but one with such sensational fresh taste! Because there are so few ingredients each one has to really play its part with flavor. I used a tart apple fresh from the farmers market and a Walla Walla Sweet Onion from the grocery plus fresh dill from my herb garden. My husband was very skeptical when I told him what I was making but after tasting the salad he was sold. We will definitely make this salad again and often this winter.

  • Scandinavian pickled cucumber

    • eeeve on August 13, 2015

      This is lovely and seems to last forever in the fridge. Used Lebanese cucumbers instead of pickling ones.

  • Eastern-spiced rhubarb relish

    • JFM on May 10, 2013

      Made it without star anise, as I don't like it. Was very good with roasted pork chops.

  • Bread and butter pickles

    • eeeve on January 26, 2016

      Made these in summer with home grown cucumbers and have finally opened a jar. Verdict: they're okay, taste slightly sweet like sweet-pickled gherkins, but I prefer the (slightly more acidic and crunchy) Scandinavian pickled cucumbers from the book. Husband likes them, though, especially with cheese and bread.

  • Cerise au vinaigre

    • Foodycat on July 20, 2014

      A very gentle sweet-sour pickled cherry - fantastic with smoked duck but even better with goose rillettes.

  • Middle Eastern pickled aubergines

    • Barb_N on November 02, 2014

      I made this as one of my first forays into eggplant pickles- unfortunately I don't think I steamed them enough for the brine to reach all the way through. The filling is delicious.

  • Pumpkin achar

    • etcjm on November 06, 2018

      Having now eaten after a while in the fridge, it's very good. Pickly, but sweet with good texture. Don't drop any it's very ORANGE!

    • etcjm on October 10, 2018

      Wanted to cook this after seeing very similar on River Cottage. Very interesting sweet sour flavour and looking forward to eating. Need to use in a month though which may be a downside. Looks so colourful but just wouldn't work as a gift due to the oily rather than thick texture.

  • Apple, cucumber and mint pickle

    • Vanessa888 on October 16, 2014

      SO delicious. The mint gives such a lovely kick.

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Reviews about this book

  • Leite's Culinaria

    In her characteristic lovely manner, Henry presents a pleasing miscellany of carefully chosen recipes varying from the everyday to the relative exotic.

    Full review
  • Bibliocook

    ...her books [are] the most stained in my collection and this brilliant preserving book will be getting the same treatment. She tackles plenty of basic skills, but the recipes often come with a twist.

    Full review
  • Food52 by Chris Ying

    The 2013 Piglet Tournament of Cookbooks vs. Nancy Singleton Hachisu's Japanese Farm Food

    Full review
  • Huffington Post United Kingdom

    This is a beautifully written and executed cookbook with careful instructions for beginners and a lot of more detailed knowledge to keep learning from.

    Full review
  • Oregonian

    ...stands out as one of the most elegant and original. The range of the recipes is astonishing... beautifully simple and yet far more alluring than those in most preserving books.

    Full review
  • ISBN 10 1845336755
  • ISBN 13 9781845336752
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Oct 10 2012
  • Format Hardcover
  • Page Count 282
  • Language English
  • Edition 1
  • Countries United Kingdom
  • Publisher Octopus Publishing Group
  • Imprint Mitchell Beazley

Publishers Text

This comprehensive book takes a fresh look at preserving, offering all the basic information you need, but also featuring inspirational recipes from the store cupboards of the world. It covers everything from jams to cures, and shows you that you don't have to have lots of kit and produce to make delicious preserves - or wait forever before eating them.

There are sections filled with expert advice on choosing ingredients and cooking every type of preserve, from marmalades to jellies to relishes to foods preserved in oil. All the classic recipes are included, and Diana often gives tips for how to make a version of a classic that suits your palette. For example, she includes a sweet and sticky strawberry jam, a more-fruity and less sweet version, and a Swedish 'nearly' strawberry jam (which is more like a conserve and keeps in the fridge for only a couple of weeks).

But this is also a treasure trove of recipes taken from the world's store cupboards. And most of them are luxuries that can be made from cheap ingredients - such as Thai spiced rhubarb relish, Alsace pear and Riesling jam and tea-smoked trout. Many recipes will also offer alternative ingredients - for example, make sloe gin with cranberries or plums.


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