The Malaysian Kitchen: 150 Recipes for Simple Home Cooking by Christina Arokiasamy

Search this book for Recipes »
    • Categories: Sauces, general; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian
    • Ingredients: red jalapeño chiles; shallots; shrimp paste; limes
    show
    • Categories: Sauces, general; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian; Vegan; Vegetarian
    • Ingredients: red jalapeño chiles; shallots; garlic; peanut oil; rice wine vinegar
    show
    • Categories: Sauces, general; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian; Vegan; Vegetarian
    • Ingredients: shallots; kecap manis; limes
    show
    • Categories: Dips, spreads & salsas; Sauces, general; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian
    • Ingredients: liquid palm sugar; rice vinegar; fish sauce; garlic; mint; cilantro; red chillies; green bird's eye chiles
    • Accompaniments: Grilled coconut-lemongrass chicken (Ayam bakar)
    show
    • Categories: Dressings & marinades; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian
    • Ingredients: avocados; tamarind water; honey; fish sauce; rice vinegar; jalapeño chiles; bird's eye chiles
    show
    • Categories: Sauces, general; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian
    • Ingredients: pineapple; tomatoes; red jalapeño chiles; shrimp paste; limes
    show
    • Categories: Dressings & marinades; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian; Vegan; Vegetarian
    • Ingredients: cilantro; mint; green onions; garlic; green chiles; limes; rice vinegar
    show
    • Categories: Chutneys, pickles & relishes; Quick / easy; Malaysian; Vegan; Vegetarian
    • Ingredients: rice wine vinegar; limes; palm sugar; pineapple; English cucumbers; shallots; red jalapeño chiles
    show
    • Categories: Spice / herb blends & rubs; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian
    • Ingredients: fresh ginger; garlic; cilantro
    show
    • Categories: Chutneys, pickles & relishes; Quick / easy; Malaysian; Vegan; Vegetarian
    • Ingredients: tamarind concentrate; fresh ginger; ground cumin; chile powder
    show
    • Categories: Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian; Vegan; Vegetarian
    • Ingredients: tamarind pulp
    show
    • Categories: Sauces, general; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian; Vegan; Vegetarian
    • Ingredients: jalapeño chiles; garlic; shallots; peanut oil; rice wine vinegar; limes
    show
    • Categories: Sauces, general; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian; Vegan; Vegetarian
    • Ingredients: olive oil; garlic
    show
    • Categories: Sauces, general; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian; Vegan; Vegetarian
    • Ingredients: shallots; peanut oil
    show
    • Categories: Spice / herb blends & rubs; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian
    • Ingredients: coconut cream; shallots; lemongrass; galangal; garlic; candlenuts; ground coriander; turmeric; red jalapeño chiles; peanut oil; rice wine vinegar
    show
    • Categories: Spice / herb blends & rubs; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian
    • Ingredients: dried chiles de arbol; shallots; garlic; liquid palm sugar; kecap manis; tamarind water
    show
    • Categories: Spice / herb blends & rubs; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian
    • Ingredients: lemongrass; onions; garlic; galangal; fresh ginger; red jalapeño chiles; shallots; peanut oil; rice wine vinegar; macadamia nuts; ground cumin; turmeric
    show
    • Categories: Sauces, general; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian; Vegan; Vegetarian
    • Ingredients: raw peanuts; garlic; red bird's eye chiles; galangal; turmeric; coconut milk; ground coriander; ground cumin; makrut lime leaves; liquid palm sugar; limes; kecap manis
    • Accompaniments: Chicken satay kajang
    show
    • Categories: Sauces, general; Quick / easy; Cooking ahead; Malaysian
    • Ingredients: tomatoes; red jalapeño chiles; shrimp paste; limes
    show
    • Categories: Soups; Quick / easy; Malaysian; Vegan; Vegetarian
    • Ingredients: red lentils; coconut oil; yellow onions; garlic; tomato paste; tomatoes; paprika; dried chickpeas; dried mint
    show
    • Categories: Rice dishes; Soups; Quick / easy; Malaysian
    • Ingredients: red lentils; basmati rice; coconut oil; yellow onions; garlic; tomato paste; tomatoes; paprika; chicken stock; jalapeño chiles
    show
    • Categories: Soups; Quick / easy; Malaysian
    • Ingredients: seafood stock; galangal; makrut lime leaves; lemongrass; shallots; white fish fillets; rice vermicelli noodles; tomatoes; fish sauce; red jalapeño chiles; shrimp paste; limes; cilantro
    show
  • Yellow lentil soup with cauliflower and spinach
    • Categories: Dressings & marinades; Quick / easy; Soups; Malaysian; Vegan; Vegetarian
    • Ingredients: yellow split lentils; garlic; turmeric; cauliflower; spinach; coconut oil; cumin seeds; black mustard seeds; curry leaves
    show
    • Categories: Dressings & marinades; Soups; Quick / easy; Malaysian; Vegetarian
    • Ingredients: yellow split lentils; yellow onions; garlic; opo squash; dried chickpeas; turmeric; cumin seeds; black mustard seeds; chile powder; garam masala
    show
    • Categories: Soups; Quick / easy; Malaysian
    • Ingredients: peanut oil; garlic; fresh ginger; shiitake mushrooms; opo squash; seafood stock; pompano; soy sauce; cilantro
    show

Notes about this book

This book does not currently have any notes.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Malaysian wok-fried spaghetti with kale and sambal

    • radishseed on February 21, 2022

      This was a bit bland, so I added a little more kecap manis and ate it with some soy sauce-pickled chiles like the ones in the photo. I'd say the recipe's 4 servings is closer to 6-8.

  • Chickpea salad with cumin-lemon dressing

    • kari500 on November 10, 2019

      Made this with two cans of chickpeas, so I doubled the dressing. Love the amchoor powder (which is optional) in this, but you could get the same flavor bang by dicing up some mango and adding that. I didn't double the vegetables. L and I both really like it a lot. Good lunch salad.

  • Tilapia simmered in creamy tomato sauce (Tilapia masak merah)

    • TrishaCP on July 17, 2021

      The recipe notes say this is good for winter, but we made this in the scorching hot summer and it was just fine! I agree that there is way too much liquid- you don’t need all of the fish stock when you are adding all of the coconut milk too. I think if you eyeball the liquid it is fine. We otherwise really enjoyed this dish.

    • Delys77 on June 05, 2017

      For us this had far far too much liquid. It was almost a soup and I found that the fish got lost in it.

    • lkgrover on May 23, 2017

      Flavorful tilapia, almost like a stew. If you don't like spicy (hot) food, you may want to decrease the dried chiles and cumin used. Also, I substituted ground ancho chiles for dried chiles, and macadamia nuts for candlenuts. I served it with this book's Fragrant coconut rice recipe.

  • Baked fish with fennel, turmeric, and olive oil

    • TrishaCP on July 20, 2020

      This is a simple and tasty baked fish recipe. We used barramundi rather than pompano. My fish was fairly thin and only needed 10 minutes to bake rather than 20 minutes. I followed the recipe’s instructions for sprinkling the spices on in order, but I wouldn’t do that again once the turmeric is on, because I didn’t feel like the spices were sprinkled evenly or equally that way. Instead, I would just mix them together before coating the fish.

  • Pineapple sambal prawns

    • L.Nightshade on June 15, 2017

      This recipe starts with a spice paste consisting of dried chiles de arbol soaked in boiling water and drained, a yellow onion, tomatoes, and shrimp paste. These are all puréed together then added to a pan with hot coconut oil. For the tiny amount of shrimp paste called for, I didn’t want to go through the recommended procedure of baking it in tin foil, so I just cooked it in a bit of the oil before adding the rest of the paste ingredients. Once the mixture comes to a boil, chunks of fresh pineapple are added. Everything simmers until the sauce thickens and the pineapple is tender, then the prawns, fish sauce, and sugar are added (I used xylitol instead of liquid palm sugar). Mr. Nightshade had his with rice, I had mine as-is. Alongside I served cucumber-yogurt raita, and sweet mango and cashew salad with chile-lime dressing, both from this book. “Fantastic” was heard more than once at table, and I had to agree. Lovely combination of flavors, and a perfect level of heat.

    • MmeFleiss on June 21, 2017

      Really delicious; we couldn't stop eating it. Definitely a repeater. I deseeded 3 of the chiles de arbol and my mom still found it a bit too spicy, so next time I will deseed more.

  • Sweet mango and cashew salad with chili-lime dressing

    • L.Nightshade on June 15, 2017

      I had one ripe mango! So I only made a third of this salad, which calls for three. It was quite sufficient for two. The dressing is made up of lime juice, liquid palm sugar (I omitted, did not substitute, the mango was super sweet), a bird’s eye chile (not around here, I used a mix of jalapeño and Serrano), and fish sauce. Diced mango and chopped cilantro are tossed together, roasted cashews and fried shallots are added. That’s it, easy as pie, and ever so delicious. I’d really think twice before adding the palm sugar if you have a sweet, ripe mango. It’s just perfect as is with the other seasonings. This was part of last night’s “fantastic” dinner which also included Pineapple Sambal Prawns and Cucumber-Yogurt Raita.

  • Cucumber-yogurt raita

    • L.Nightshade on June 15, 2017

      OK, it’s not terribly photogenic, but it’s quite good. The usual simple prep: stir together yogurt, cumin, cayenne, salt, pepper, and grated cucumber. You’re supposed to sprinkle the cilantro on top, which would have been prettier, but I was rushing through and not paying attention. I just stirred it in. No big deal, the cilantro was evenly distributed, which I felt was an advantage. The one thing I would say about this is that it was a bit too salty for my taste. Mr. NS thought it was fine, however, and he usually likes things less salty than I. It worked beautifully with the Pineapple Sambal Prawns; I only noticed the saltiness when tasting it on its own.

  • Asparagus and coconut salad with citrus dressing

    • L.Nightshade on June 15, 2017

      I wasn’t quite sure about the prep instructions on this one. After instructing to peel the asparagus ends and cut the stalks in half, she says to boil them in a pot large enough to hold them in a horizontal position. If you’d cut them in half, isn’t almost any pot going to be large enough to hold them? Did she mean that one should cut them in half longitudinally? I don’t know. I did it a different way, I cooked the stalks in my asparagus pot, which holds them upright, stems in the water to boil, tops above to steam. I cut them in half after cooking. We liked this, but it didn’t ring our bells. It was a lovely part of our meal, but I doubt I’d make it again. Disclaimer: the only unsweetened coconut we can find is desiccated. Very very desiccated.

    • MmeFleiss on May 13, 2017

      I really liked that she used asparagus in place of something that would be hard to get here. Easy and delicious salad.

    • clcorbi on June 13, 2017

      Easy and pretty good. I think I'd prefer to sautee the shrimp next time rather than boil them. Something about the flavor profile of the dressing was a bit off to me, but not sure what. Still, this made for a tasty and fresh dinner.

  • Sweet and tangy pineapple salad

    • L.Nightshade on June 15, 2017

      SWEET AND TANGY PINEAPPLE SALAD, page 109. This. Is. Perfect. And easy to boot! Diced fresh pineapple, diced cucumber, and chopped basil are tossed with a dressing of lime juice, fish sauce, Thai bird chiles, sugar (stevia here), and salt. Sambal oelek (or Pineapple Sambal Tumis, if you are only slightly more ambitious than I) . Top with peanuts (I didn’t grind mine), and garnish with basil leaves. I made this a little too hot for Mr. NS, but he still couldn’t resist gobbling it up. It’s almost more like a relish than a salad, and would be a great accompaniment to many main dishes, if diced a bit more finely than I diced. Either way, I can just eat it with a spoon. A big spoon.

    • clcorbi on June 19, 2017

      Yum! Echoing L.Nightshade that this is easy and tasty. We did a pretty fine dice and I agree that this would make a really nice relish/condiment type of thing. Since I used storebought sambal oelek, which I know is hotter than the author's recipe, I reduced the amount to 3T rather than 5T. The salad was still quite spicy, perfect for our taste. I subbed cilantro for the basil just because I had a bunch to use up, and it tasted nice, but I'm sure it would have only been better with the basil.

    • jenburkholder on October 01, 2020

      As the other reviews say, this is good!

  • Traditional Malaysian stir-fried noodles (Mamak mee goreng)

    • Delys77 on June 13, 2017

      I also found this good but I am finding that the she has a sweeter tooth than us. I would cut back the kecap manis by half and increase the soy. I also would say that you need a very big wok to manage this, or you should cook half the portion at a time. I also found the eggs disappeared on me in this.

    • MmeFleiss on May 13, 2017

      A definite keeper. Worth the price of the book just for this recipe!

  • Chicken satay kajang

    • Delys77 on June 19, 2017

      We really aren't having much luck with this book. I found this recipe also had far too much turmeric. Having enjoyed my share of satay in Indonesia I found this to be a bit one dimensional other than the slight acrid quality of the turmeric and galangal. Not a winner for us.

  • Tandoori broiled salmon

    • Delys77 on June 19, 2017

      I have attempted a version of this dish a few times and there is something about the tandoori and the salmon that don't work for us. I have rated this one poorly but it might just be about personal preference.

    • Stephenn31 on October 25, 2022

      Delicious and easy!

  • Black hokkien noodles with shrimp and cabbage

    • Delys77 on June 05, 2017

      A bit too sweet with not enough heat or acidity. Also the pansit canton need to be reconstituted very gingerly as mine were mushy.

  • Butter chicken masala

    • Delys77 on June 08, 2017

      This was good. went with a bit over 2 lbs of chicken and made about 4-5 servings. If you have the ginger garlic paste made it is doable on a weekday. Flavour profile is more reminiscent of a classic curry than butter chicken but not in a bad way.

  • Cashew chicken

    • Delys77 on June 13, 2017

      I was pleasantly surprised by the thai roasted chile paste as it was very spicy and had a lovely sweet/heat/funk to it. Overall this dish was good but I would much prefer it with thighs and i would also add some vegetable such as green beans. A possible repeat.

    • jenburkholder on October 01, 2020

      My notes in the book are "good, easy". I like the chili paste flavor - a lot of easy bang for your buck in a recipe. I always prefer thighs in this sort of thing. It's pretty much all meat so a good veg side dish or two is a must! Or adding beans or greens here would also be good, maybe reduce the chicken or up the chili paste.

  • Fried tofu and tomatoes in sweet soy sambal

    • meggan on March 02, 2021

      I made this with canned tomatoes and fried my own tofu. It’s easy and delicious. Could benefit from the addition of some veggies.

    • jenburkholder on August 12, 2020

      This is astonishingly delicious. In our house it’s just known as “The Tofu,” and we eat a lot of tofu. If you bake the tofu or buy pre-fried, it’s almost laughably easy. A winner for sure.

  • Grilled lamb chops with rosemary-garlic pesto

    • lkgrover on November 11, 2022

      Delicious lamb chops.

  • Broccoli, cauliflower, and shiitake combination

    • lkgrover on March 14, 2019

      A great side dish for an Asian meal; will make again.

  • Fragrant coconut rice

    • lkgrover on May 23, 2017

      "Fragrant" is an appropriate name for this recipe. If you enjoy coconut, I highly recommend this flavored rice. It cooks just as easily as normal rice too (in the rice cooker or stovetop). I served it with this book's Tilapia simmered in creamy tomato sauce recipe (which also contains coconut milk).

  • Pineapple fried rice with chicken and cashews

    • lkgrover on September 21, 2017

      Excellent! I substituted pork for chicken, and added broccoli. Fried rice is my Indonesian former roommate's comfort food. This closely matches her version. (She adds whatever leftover vegetables are in the refrigerator: broccoli, carrots, peas, spinach, mushrooms were common additions. And everything was garnished with Sriracha sauce, which is too spicy for me.)

    • jenburkholder on October 01, 2020

      Very good. I subbed ham for chicken since that's what I had. Didn't need a whole pound of meat, and the cashews are a must. This one is definitely a must.

  • Village fried rice with chicken and spinach

    • lkgrover on January 14, 2019

      Delicious! I added a julienned carrot, and substituted a jalapeno chile for the green bird's eye chiles.

  • Salmon in creamy tikka masala

    • lkgrover on September 06, 2017

      Excellent salmon dish; spicy but not too hot. I served it with sticky rice.

  • Fried rice with anchovies, shrimp, and cabbage (Nasi goreng)

    • lkgrover on January 29, 2018

      This is a light version of fried rice. The heat from the sauce and chiles gets absorbed by the rice, so it is not overwhelming. It cooks quickly, especially if you use leftover rice. I substituted commercial Thai chile-lime sauce for the sambal belachan/sambal ulek. I left out the dried anchovies and the sugar.

  • Stir-fried Asian greens with garlic and oyster sauce (Sawi goreng)

    • lkgrover on February 25, 2022

      Made with baby bok choy. Good side dish, made to accompany a spicier stir fry.

    • jenburkholder on October 01, 2020

      Good. It's on the rich/savory side with the shiitakes, oyster sauce, and a fair amount of oil so we thought it paired best with something sharp as a contrast.

  • Stir-fried vermicelli with chicken (Bihun goreng)

    • MmeFleiss on August 23, 2021

      Very quick and very tasty dinner. Even my picky child willingly ate this.

  • Ginger-sesame chicken wings

    • MmeFleiss on May 13, 2017

      Really easy weeknight dish. It really would make a great appetizer for a party. I wish I had doubled it as the full recipe wasn't enough for 4 adults.

  • Braised pork belly with soy garlic sauce

    • MmeFleiss on May 13, 2017

      Another really easy and delicious recipe that is 99% hands off. Great with rice and a bland veg side due to the strong flavor.

    • jenburkholder on May 26, 2022

      Very easy and delicious. Only made a half recipe with a nice lean piece of pork belly - a normal one would have probably been too fatty for us. Had with stir-fried celtuce and a sharp tomato salad (+ rice). Will make again.

  • Malay-style chicken omelet sandwich (Roti john)

    • clcorbi on June 19, 2017

      I was very intrigued by the idea of this sandwich. I subbed ground pork for chicken and used white sandwich-sized potato buns rather than white bread, but otherwise followed the recipe as written. I found the instructions to be pretty flawed, and as I was reading them I didn't think they'd work, but I tried anyway. Theoretically, you pour the omelette mixture into a hot oiled pan and then place your buns directly onto the raw egg, and then scrape the egg mixture underneath the bread until it's cooked through and is the same shape as the bread. What actually happened was that the egg never cooked all the way through so the bread was covered in raw egg, while the bottom layer started to get burnt. It's also pretty impossible to form the raw egg into a round bun shape. If I were to repeat these I'd just cook the mixture like a normal omelette and then cut it up for each sandwich. A good swipe of mayo is really necessary here. These were all right but I don't think I'd bother to repeat.

  • Malaysian chili prawns

    • clcorbi on June 27, 2017

      My favorite recipe I've tried from this book so far. The sauce here is just luscious! Following the author's instructions, it won't turn out as thick as the photo, but the flavor is still amazing. I will note that I had to omit the curry leaves, which I'm sure would have only made this more delicious. The ketchup balances the spiciness of the sambal oelek perfectly. We served this over rice with some sliced, marinated cucumbers, but I think that the author's suggestion of serving with crusty bread would have been even better. One caveat about the recipe instructions--the author mentions in the headnote that these prawns develop a nice sear from the wok, but she then never has you cook them over higher than medium heat. You also add the chile sauce at the same time as the prawns. There is no way they can get seared like that! This didn't really affect the final outcome of the dish for me, but it did fit with my general impression that the instructions in this book can be iffy.

  • Fried rice with shrimp, bacon, and eggs

    • jenburkholder on October 01, 2020

      What's not to like about this? Son #1 prefers to avoid meat, and won't eat shrimp so he skipped it. Son #2 and I thought it was very good, to the extent that he asked me to make it again (very unusual occurance). I think I skipped the ground pork, feeling that bacon/shrimp/eggs was enough protein. The veg in it is needed as it's a pretty rich fried rice.

  • Tilapia baked in coconut sambal

    • jenburkholder on January 10, 2022

      Tasty; light and aromatic, the seasonings enhance the fish nicely and the baking time was spot on. Given that it’s a bit of a hassle, though, and the results are only good, probably won’t repeat.

  • Penang's famous char kway teow

    • jenburkholder on October 01, 2020

      Good, but plain-ish with the main seasoning of sweet soy and soy sauce (I didn't use authentic kecap manis b/c I had Thai sweet soy around). The shrimp got overcooked using her method, I'd take them out next time before stir-frying the noodles and sauce, though might work her way if my shrimp were larger (I used 31-40s). I used XL dried rice noodles, soaked then briefly dipped into off the boil water to get them to perfect stir-fry texture. Worked well, and I'd make again but maybe a little different method.

  • Tamarind fish curry

    • jenburkholder on October 01, 2020

      This was good, but not tamarind-y enough for us (we love "sharp" flavors). Next time I'd make a stronger tamarind water from my block of tamarind. It's very rich, which I think I wasn't expecting - could even do light coconut milk which I usually avoid. I'd make again but potentially riff on it a bit, changing the veg in it (not a big eggplant fan) and making the tamarind stronger.

  • Portuguese debal prawns

    • jenburkholder on August 22, 2021

      Good and so easy, would definitely make again. Used leftover sambal from the same book.

  • Cabbage sautéed with eggs, turmeric, and curry leaves

    • jenburkholder on October 01, 2020

      Good, easy, different than the "normal" cabbage dish but definitely a repeater.

  • Stir-fried asparagus with sambal belachan

    • jenburkholder on October 01, 2020

      This one was okay. My son liked it better than I did. Something about the long spears of asparagus with the sambal just didn't do it for me. Different veg? Even chopped instead of longer spears? Not sure, and I didn't like it enough to repeat.

  • Red lentil and chickpea soup with mint

    • jenburkholder on October 01, 2020

      Very good, very easy. Using dried chickpeas it took longer than 35-40 minutes to cook (which was expected because... chickpeas!). A nice and satisfying soup.

  • Yellow lentil soup with cauliflower and spinach

  • Malaccan-Portuguese spicy halibut soup

    • jenburkholder on June 08, 2022

      Good, but not super distinctive. Had with white rice and sautéed asparagus.

  • Butternut squash soup in lemongrass coconut milk

    • jenburkholder on October 01, 2020

      As she says - comforting and creamy. If you like these flavors, this will be very satisfying and the "results to effort" ratio is reasonable. We added cilantro because it seemed appropriate (and we love it).

  • Sambal ulek

    • jenburkholder on October 01, 2020

      The first time we made it we used Fresnos as red jalapenos weren't available - not sure if this is normal, but it was SO HOT - much hotter than I would have expected with jalapenos. Delicious, but we cut down the amount used. Second time was a blend of Fresnos and a milder chili, which allowed for usage in the larger quantities she has in some recipes.

  • Oven-baked chicken tandoori

    • jenburkholder on September 20, 2022

      A rare miss from this book. I followed the recipe, though using chicken drumsticks instead of thighs. Marinated 24 hours. The chicken came out a bit mushy and not very enjoyable to eat, and the oven baking didn't give it any crispy edges that can help offset that texture. Would not repeat.

  • Stir-fried cabbage with soy sauce

    • Stephenn31 on October 25, 2022

      Delicious with minimal ingredients. The white pepper has a surprising kick

You must Create an Account or Sign In to add a note to this book.

Reviews about this book

  • Eat Your Books by Jenny Hartin

    This beautifully photographed book will transport you to Malaysia with simple recipes that focus on flavor.

    Full review
  • ISBN 10 0544809998
  • ISBN 13 9780544809994
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Mar 21 2017
  • Format Hardcover
  • Page Count 352
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Publishers Text

Irresistible Malaysian recipes for the American home cook, including curries, noodle bowls, stir-fries, street foods, and more

A delicious and informal mashup of Southeast Asian and European influences, Malaysian cooking is full of flavor and easy to love. Chef and author Christina Arokiasamy brings it into the American home kitchen. This cuisine borrows from the traditions of Thailand, India, China, and Portugal for dishes as varied as Chili Prawns, Salmon Tandoori, Hainanese Chicken Rice, and Grilled Lamb with Rosemary Pesto. Christina gives recipes for authentic Malaysian favorites like Beef Rendang and Char Kway Teow Noodles, while also sharing her own modern iterations, such as Wok-Fried Spaghetti with Kale. An assortment of sambals and chili sauces—simply thrown together in a blender—get you started on your way to these dishes but are so tasty and versatile you’ll find yourself using them in the rest of your everyday cooking. Vivid on-location photography takes the reader into the spice markets, coffee houses, fishing villages, and kitchen gardens that inspired each recipe.


Other cookbooks by this author