x

Welcome to Eat Your Books!

If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs.

Become a member and you can create your own personal ‘Bookshelf’. Imagine having a single searchable index of all your recipes – both digital and print!

Flavor Flours: A New Way to Bake with Teff, Buckwheat, Sorghum, Other Whole & Ancient Grains, Nuts & Non-Wheat Flours by Alice Medrich

Search this book for Recipes »

Notes about this book

This book does not currently have any notes.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Basic pancakes

    • stockholm28 on June 14, 2015

      I made the version with oat flour. These pancakes are a little more delicate than pancakes made with wheat flour so be careful when flipping.

  • Peach crumble

    • TrishaCP on August 29, 2016

      This was really delicious and received raves, though I would personally reduce or eliminate the nutmeg next time. The method of cooking the crumble topping separately kept it really crisp. I didn't have rice flour, so ended up using AP flour instead. I also changed the proportions to be half AP/half toasted oat flour, and I was satisfied with the result.

  • German chocolate cake

    • helskitchenvt on July 04, 2016

      The Carrot Cake from this book was featured in the Piglet Tournament as the reviewer's new go-to carrot cake, but my money is on this German Chocolate Cake. I really don't see how it could be better.

  • Carrot spice cake with cream cheese frosting

    • DKennedy on March 19, 2015

      According to 2015 Piiglet competition, this is the best Carrot Cake that the judge who reviewed ever ate. I made it and really liked the cake, but I think I prefer the Huckleberry GF carrot cake. The frosting is outstanding.

    • stockholm28 on June 06, 2015

      I made this based on the piglet review. This is a good carrot cake, although a bit sweeter than I prefer. I thought the cake was better on day two as it was less " Crumbly" and quite moist. I had some trouble with the icing. She heats cream cheese and butter in the microwave on low until they are soft and then mixes with powdered sugar and vanilla. My microwave only has one setting and the cream cheese mixed with butter initially had the texture of cottage cheese. It tasted fine, but the texture wasn't quite right.

    • Frogcake on October 04, 2016

      Hands down this is the best carrot cake I've ever tasted. It's really moist, has a perfect balance of spices, and just gets better the following day. The rice flour and a little oat flour provides complexity of flavour and a lovely, delicate crumb. I thought it was excellent without any icing at all or just a sprinkle of icing sugar.

  • Simple scones

    • FJT on August 30, 2017

      These had a nice flavour thanks to the oat flour, but apart from that everything went wrong. I don't have a stand mixer and used my food processor instead and that may be the root of the problems. However. the recipe says that the dough should be very stiff ... mine really wasn't despite weighing the ingredients carefully. The dough apparently can't be over beaten, so I kept going in the FP but the dough wasn't getting any stiffer and probably wasn't getting much air incorporated, so after about 6 minutes I gave up and tried to mould the dough into a log to refrigerate (difficult given its loose consistency). After two hours in the fridge the dough wasn't solid enough to cut, so I left it overnight. Not surprisingly these scones did not rise at all and were quite dense. Don't think I'll be trying these again!

  • Double oatmeal cookies

    • njp on April 07, 2017

      Made these with coconut oil instead of butter. They were delicious, but the coconut oil gets very hard after being chilled. Next time I'll try dropping the dough on cookie sheets first.

  • Dark and spicy pumpkin loaf

    • Frogcake on October 07, 2016

      This is the third recipe I've tried in this book and so far I'm impressed. I made muffins here, which were quite savoury. Will be making these again and again. In place of raisins I threw in a quarter cup of each of chopped pecans and dried cranberries. We really loved the light, delicate texture of these muffins. I'm excited to try more rice flour-buckwheat flour and other flour combinations in this book.

  • Oat sablés

    • AllAboutFood on April 10, 2015

      Excellent texture, mouth feel and taste. But I found these cookies at least 10 to 15% too sweet for my taste. Has anyone else experienced this? I am anxious to try the buckwheat sables too and many more recipes from this intriguing book. And perhaps one of the variations listed for the oat sables.

  • Chocolate sablés

    • FJT on December 05, 2016

      Very similar to a cookie my Mum used to make. These are not very sweet which is a good thing in my book. These were just fine, but didn't wow us. I may try the variation which includes chopped chocolate in addition to the cocoa next time round.

  • Classic ginger cookies

    • FJT on September 09, 2016

      Perfect ginger cookie! I halved the recipe as 50 cookies is just too much temptation. Easy to make as long as you chill the cookie dough for a few hours and delicious.

    • TrishaCP on December 13, 2015

      These are great-gingery (I also used crystallized ginger) and savory and pretty much everything you want a ginger cookie to be. I cooked them the minimum time so they would stay soft as I don't like crispy ginger cookies. My one complaint is that I felt like the oatmeal flour (I used a toasted version) is lost here against the bold ginger- if I hadn't baked them I wouldn't have known they weren't made with regular flour. (I guess that may be a plus for some.)

    • SLane on December 30, 2014

      I made this recipe this month & loved them. They are VERY gingery but also very delicious ! I used crystalised ginger and it was fine. They turned out a little soft & chewy but that was OK too.

    • helskitchenvt on July 04, 2016

      A really wonderful cookie. I used these in my restaurant as a gluten free alternative dessert, but so many non-gluten-free people demanded them that they just became the default ginger cookie. And in fact my most popular cookie.

  • Apple crumble

    • eliza on May 05, 2017

      Quite good. I found the crumble mix a little too sweet, but otherwise liked it. I added some seeds for some of the nuts (sunflower and pumpkin seeds), and liked the change. Would make again with a bit less sugar.

  • Coconut Key lime tart

    • swegener on June 22, 2015

      SO good! The coconut crust was a particular hit. It was a bit hard to cut, but tasted amazing! I topped it with whipped coconut cream and toasted coconut!

You must Create an Account or Sign In to add a note to this book.

Reviews about this book

  • ISBN 10 1579655130
  • ISBN 13 9781579655136
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Nov 04 2014
  • Format Hardcover
  • Page Count 368
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Workman Publishing
  • Imprint Artisan

Publishers Text

In this monumental new work, beloved dessert queen Alice Medrich applies her baking precision and impeccable palate to flavor flours—wheat-flour alternatives including rice flour, oat flour, corn flour, sorghum flour, teff, and more. The resulting (gluten-free!) recipes show that baking with alternate flours adds an extra dimension of flavor. Brownies made with rice flour taste even more chocolaty. Buckwheat adds complexity to a date and nut cake. Ricotta cheesecake gets bonus flavor from a chestnut flour crust; teff is used to make a chocolate layer cake that can replace any birthday cake with equally pleasing results. All of the nearly 125 recipes—including Double Oatmeal Cookies, Buckwheat Gingerbread, Chocolate Chestnut Soufflé Cake, and Blueberry Corn Flour Cobbler—take the flavors of our favorite desserts to the next level.

The book is organized by flour, with useful information on its taste, flavor affinities, and more. And because flavor flours don’t react in recipes the same way as wheat flour, Medrich explains her innovative new techniques with the clarity and detail she is known for.



Other cookbooks by this author