An Everlasting Meal: Cooking with Economy and Grace by Tamar Adler

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    • Categories: Pasta, doughs & sauces; Main course; Vegetarian
    • Ingredients: any shape pasta; vegetables of your choice; grated cheese
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    • Ingredients: whole chicken; carrots; onions; celery; parsley; thyme; bay leaves; leeks; fennel
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    • Ingredients: whole chicken; carrots; onions; celery; leeks; parsley; thyme; bay leaves; noodles
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Notes about this book

  • Ganga108 on March 07, 2022

    How I love this book - it is such a joy to read, and full of suggestions, tips and recipes. There are more recipes shared in-line than described formally - I have cooked more of those than of the listed ones. I head for this book whenever I need some inspiration in the kitchen. It is also great to delve into with an afternoon cuppa - a half an hour's random dive into the book will not only have you designing next week's menu, it will put a big smile on your face.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Garlicky leaf, stem, and core pesto

    • westminstr on September 30, 2014

      I've made this a few times - it's quite good. I would make it more often, but the only thing I can think to do with it is mix with pasta or spread on bread, and the kids don't love it. It's been a while though, I should try it again.... and I did! Yum. We just ate it with a spoon. I will make this more often. (But it does take about 2 hours to cook)

    • bernalgirl on March 13, 2019

      Meh

  • A vibrant vegetable salad

    • westminstr on January 24, 2014

      I very much enjoyed this adaptable salad. As she says, its a good way to brighten leftover roasted roots. I didn't have quite all the ingredients, but it hardly matters.

  • Minestra di herbe passate

    • westminstr on October 29, 2013

      I've made this soup a couple of times and it has always been good. Most recently made with just potatoes and sorrel (about 5 cups worth) -- this was excellent! Though when I blended the soup it was a bit thin so I added in the remains of a head of lettuce that I didn't think we'd get around to. The lettuce bulked it up nicely but the flavor was a little better with just potatoes and sorrel. Still quite a good soup though. Made again 1/2014 with about two cups minced dill and parsley (mostly stems and some leaves). It was a bit fibrous so I forced it through a strainer before serving. I love this soup!

  • Dogged vinaigrette

    • westminstr on September 30, 2014

      I used this to dress some puntarelle, IIRC. It is indeed a very strong viniagrette, not for the faint of heart, but good if you have strong bitter greens.

  • Minestrone

    • westminstr on December 22, 2012

      this is the best minestrone recipe. Great every time!

    • mlbatt on June 10, 2017

      This is my "go-to" minestrone recipe. I make it every other month or so, and love it every time. So versatile and delicious.

  • How to boil broccoli or cauliflower

    • westminstr on September 30, 2014

      I've done this many times since reading this book. I do prefer cauliflower roasted if I have the time, but the boiled broccoli is excellent, better than steamed.

  • Sedate vegetable pasta

    • westminstr on September 30, 2014

      I've made this pasta quite a few times for emergency meals. As she says, you can really improve it by adding parsley, olives, capers, breadcrumbs, anchovies etc. -- but the basic version is still pretty good.

  • Cauliflower or broccoli soup

    • westminstr on September 30, 2014

      I used this variation of "potage" to make soup out of my leftover kale stems! This turned out to be a big success! I wasn't sure whether the kale stems would break down, but I sliced them very thinly and they were fine. (More than fine - delicious) I used three cups sliced kale stems for one potato, half an onion, and a large clove of garlic.

  • Cauliflower salad

    • westminstr on September 30, 2014

      This wasn't my favorite cauliflower preparation, but O liked it because of the olives and capers, and he actually asked to take some in his lunchbox. So for this reason I call it a success. I boiled the cauliflower for convenience/speed but would have liked it much better with roasted cauliflower. Used a purple cauli and the vinegar bleached it such a pretty pink! O loved the "rainbow cauliflower."

  • Ricotta tart

    • mlbatt on October 23, 2020

      Cherry tomatoes roasted in a little olive oil with chopped fresh rosemary leaves top a rich ricotta custard in an olive oil crust. I attempted Adler's olive oil tart crust, but it didn't work out for me (see recipe index for my comments). I searched and found an easy press-in olive oil crust that worked out fine. Hubby really enjoyed the tart. I thought it needed more punch -- a bit more salt in the custard and some in the tomato topping, and we could barely taste the rosemary. I probably erred on the low side for that herb because it can easily overtake the flavors. Another option was thyme, but I used fresh rosemary because that's what I had in the house.

    • bernalgirl on March 13, 2019

      Endlessly versatile and delicious, use any leftover vegetable, gorgeous with cherry tomatoes. Can use whole eggs.

  • Olive oil tart dough

    • mlbatt on October 22, 2020

      I really wanted to like this, as I adore Tamar Adler's writing and recipes. However, this did not work for me. Dividing in 1/2 and rolling out to 1/4 inch didn't give me enough for a 9-inch pan. Also, the directions were vague. My crust, rolled (thinner, because of above) and blind baked, still had enough shrinkage to be useless. It tasted great, and was like a cracker. Oh well, I will try the Food52 olive oil press-in tart dough instead.

  • Parsley salad

    • mcvl on August 28, 2020

      I love parsley salads, and this is a particularly good one. Since raw rough-chopped Italian parsley has the texture of shredded file folders, I made it a day in advance so it could fatigue, or soften. Next time I'll use curly parsley, which I also like very much.

  • Rice and lettuce soup

    • mcvl on May 16, 2022

      Refined and luscious with lashings of cream added in.

    • bernalgirl on March 13, 2019

      Absolute comfort food when made with a rich chicken stock.

  • Marinated goat cheese

    • anniette on October 10, 2021

      I like this idea very much, but found the spicing a tad bland. Also, the jar — I used a standard canning jar — was awkward to fish around in to retrieve cheese without pulverizing it on the way out. I switched to a wide glass storage container. Now I can add more cheese as I go, but still fish out the oldest, most marinated piece first. I increased the garlic and fennel seeds, added a pinch of red pepper flakes and some rosemary. Now I'm addicted. On crunchy toast, it is the perfect breakfast. The olive oil solidifies somewhat in the fridge, and the oil and cheese are delicious spread on toast. Cumin seeds next batch.

    • May3 on October 28, 2014

      This is outstanding. Delicious on bruschetta topped with diced cherry tomatoes and a little spring onion. I added a little garlic and grated lemon rind. Keeps well in fridge and gets better after a day or so.

  • Garlicky yogurt omelette

  • Chickpea pasta

    • IndyGirl on November 27, 2015

      Used 3 cans of chickpeas--simmered for at least 1 hr, possibly even two hours. Also, needed 2 cups of pasta water to loosen the sauce. Put in 3/4 cup of parmesan cheese--didn't taste the cheese. Hearty taste. Added lemon zest of one lemon the same night, and didn't taste it Added sundried tomatoes to the leftovers, and it was even better. For next time: Put on low boil, will likely be done faster. Reserve at least 4 cups of pasta water, some of the water for leftovers. Skip the parmesan. If desired, add more lemon zest than the zest of one lemon. Definately add sun dried tomatoes--is so, don't need the lemon zest.

  • Greens sandwich

    • ellencooks on November 21, 2022

      I made this into a grilled sandwich with a bolillo roll with leftover beet greens cooked with onions and garlic, ricotta and a bit of grated mozzarella left over from making pizza. So good!!

  • Spicy green beans

    • clcorbi on January 11, 2017

      I chose this recipe in order to use up a random can of green beans we'd had in the pantry for at least a year. This was delicious! We used 1.5t of red pepper flakes but I think, if I ever have need to make this recipe again, I'd use the full 2t. This dish was so pungent and tasty--Adler suggests serving it with rice, which I think would be delicious, but we had it with the Bread Fritters from Jerusalem and really loved the combination. A great way to use up canned green beans!

  • Roast broccoli salad

    • clcorbi on February 20, 2017

      Inspired by this idea, I made a salad with broccoli roasted until quite crisp, tossed with sliced red onions, red wine vinegar, and a bit of nutritional yeast. Delicious! The leftovers got even better, too--the broccoli was obviously no longer crispy, but the flavor was wonderful. This is a great treatment for roasted veggies and I will try again with a thinly sliced chile, like Adler recommends.

  • Ribollita

    • clcorbi on November 27, 2016

      I followed this recipe VERY loosely, adding half a chopped fennel bulb, a head of broccoli, a TON of extra stock, a crumbled Italian sausage, and some tomato paste. I had never tried adding stale bread to a soup before and found that I wasn't too crazy about the result--even after a long simmer, the bread chunks had not broken down quite as thoroughly as I'd expected. I think if I try this soup again I'll be sure to rip the bread (this time, it was sourdough) into even smaller pieces. Despite the fact that I barely followed this recipe, we both loved the final soup, which managed to use up almost every extra vegetable scrap in the fridge! The improvised result felt very much in keeping with the spirit of the book.

  • Salsa verde

    • Ganga108 on March 07, 2022

      Gotta love a good salsa verda with a bucket of the best, crispy fried chips around - a Sunday night feast! I add mustard and leave out the anchovy. A little miso can be added to get that salty anchovy taste, but it is great without it.

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Reviews about this book

  • Scribd

    Excerpt from the book.

    Full review
  • Chocolate & Zucchini

    Her beautiful, haunting voice, her wise words, and her sound advice come together into a timeless book you want to read slowly, savoring each chapter...

    Full review
  • ISBN 10 143918187X
  • ISBN 13 9781439181874
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Oct 18 2011
  • Format Hardcover
  • Page Count 272
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Scribner Book Company
  • Imprint Scribner Book Company

Publishers Text

Reviving the inspiring message of M. F. K. Fisher’s How to Cook a Wolf - written in 1942 during wartime shortages - An Everlasting Meal shows that cooking is the path to better eating. Through the insightful essays in An Everlasting Meal, Tamar Adler issues a rallying cry to home cooks.

In chapters about boiling water, cooking eggs and beans, and summoning respectable meals from empty cupboards, Tamar weaves philosophy and instruction into approachable lessons on instinctive cooking. Tamar shows how to make the most of everything you buy, demonstrating what the world’s great chefs know: that great meals rely on the bones and peels and ends of meals before them.

She explains how to smarten up simple food and gives advice for fixing dishes gone awry. She recommends turning to neglected onions, celery, and potatoes for inexpensive meals that taste full of fresh vegetables, and cooking meat and fish resourcefully.

By wresting cooking from doctrine and doldrums, Tamar encourages readers to begin from wherever they are, with whatever they have. An Everlasting Meal is elegant testimony to the value of cooking and an empowering, indispensable tool for eaters today.



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