American Home Cooking: Over 300 Spirited Recipes Celebrating Our Rich Tradition of Home Cooking by Bill Jamison and Cheryl Alters Jamison

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Notes about this book

  • Eat Your Books

    2000 James Beard Award Winner, International Association of Culinary Professionals Award Winner

  • Eat Your Books

    2000 James Beard Award Winner, International Association of Culinary Professionals Award Winner

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Skillet asparagus

    • jenmacgregor18 on June 03, 2015

      very simple; but that's how I prefer my asparagus.

  • Bourbon-and-butter pecan pie

    • jenmacgregor18 on June 02, 2015

      Best-ever-pecan pie! I used whisky instead of bourbon. But this is the only pecan pie I've tried that isn't sickeningly sweet. I think the molasses flavor of the cane syrup and dark brown sugar along with whisky balance out nicely. I took it to a potluck and people actually hunted me down. "Who brought that pecan pie?! and "What's in it?" They were impressed. I think this is going to be my go to pecan pie. I ordered Steen's cane syrup online and a bottle of their molasses too. It was recommended by writer Laurie Colwin (Home Cooking; and More Home Cooking). I need to try her ginger bread recipe too.

  • Apple crisp

    • jenmacgregor18 on October 25, 2017

      Straightforward and simple. I added a little spiced rum. very good.

  • Salmon poached in hard cider

    • Yildiz100 on March 06, 2017

      I used three 5.3 ounce filets in place of whole salmon, and I reduced the other ingredients to 1/3 of the original. This was better than plain baked salmon with lemon and butter, but I am not completely convinced that it is worth the extra effort. That said, I would make it one more time with two modifications to see if they make a difference. I would try a different brand of apple cider (my husband picked up Angry Orchard, which had an unpleasant artificial apple smell) and I would try leaving a little of the bacon in the cooking liquid with the salmon to achieve a smokier flavor. Poaching is a great technique for salmon-it really helped the flavors permeate the fish.

  • Broccoli-rice casserole

    • Yildiz100 on October 10, 2014

      I thought this was very little rice relative to the broccoli. Additionally, I dind't like the idea of steaming the onions instead of sauteeing them. I ended up with something yummy in the end, but I made so many small changes that I think I'll just use a different recipe next time.

  • Glazed corned beef

    • kateiscoooking on February 18, 2018

      This is a nice change to the normal corned beef in the crock pot!

  • Stuffed pork chops

    • Shelmar on September 06, 2019

      Wow! Remember to have corn bread for crumbs.

  • Pan-fried rib eye

    • Shelmar on September 06, 2019

      Doable, but inferior to grill.

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  • ISBN 10 0060747641
  • ISBN 13 9780060747640
  • Published Jan 01 2005
  • Format Paperback
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher HarperCollins Publishers Inc
  • Imprint William Morrow

Publishers Text

New in paperback! Cheryl and Bill Jamison, the bestselling, award-winning duo, whose cookbooks have sold more than 500,000 copies combined, now present another sure-fire classic: a homegrown feast of 400 dishes that pay tribute to America's culinary legacy, from scrumptious comfort foods to exhilarating regional flavors.


The best American cooking has always thrived on diversity, and American Home Cooking celebrates both our beloved comfort foods and the amazing surprises from our ethnic and regional heritage. It's all served with a big helping of anecdotes that capture the spirit and ingenuity of the cooks who have nourished America from its founding to the eve of a new millennium.


You'll find all of the familiar coast-to-coast favorites such as meat loaf and clam chowder, along with regional specialties such as Tuscon Chimichangas. Ever tried a Louisville Benedictine, an Iowa Skinny, or a Miles Standish They're all sandwiches, and they're all local treasures. Modern classics in American Home Cooking include cioppino, chop suey, and pasta primavera. With sidebars celebrating our nation's most memorable culinary phenomena and figures from Betty Crocker to Julia Child, this sweeping collection offers a delicious idea for every meal and occasion, every day of the year. Autgraphed bookplate comes with the book!



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