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Sundays at Moosewood Restaurant: Ethnic and Regional Recipes from the Cooks at the Legendary Restaurant by Moosewood Collective

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Notes about this book

  • gcottraux on February 01, 2010

    I used to use this cookbook a lot more. It seems dated now, but the ethnic/regional slant makes it useful still. Vegetarian cooking has come a long way in terms of bright fresh flavors and presentation.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • West African peanut soup

    • TippyCanoe on September 23, 2013

      I have been making this soup for years and it still gets rave reviews from family and friends. I love the mix of peanuts, sweet potatoes, carrots and cayenne. I often substitute canned tomatoes or tomato sauce for the tomato juice as I don't tend to have tomato juice on hand. I have even tossed in good organic tomato soup. Any of these work well.

    • TrishaCP on December 20, 2016

      This made for a delicious dinner on a very cold night. I made my own peanut butter by blitzing peanuts in the food processor, and then added a can of tomatoes and blitzed them too (as a sub for the juice). I made the vegetable stock from the book to use in this recipe, and I wouldn't bother doing that again because it added nothing. Since I am not vegetarian, I would probably choose chicken stock for more depth of flavor.

  • Cape Verde vegetable soup

    • ajs on July 04, 2010

      Delicious and very easy. I add more chile than suggested to make it really spicy.

    • Westy2 on October 13, 2013

      Wonderful. Easy and different

  • East African sweet pea soup

    • Wlow on August 13, 2017

      9/93: Good—has potential 8/98: Wow! Very good w/o last addition of water, served as a stew (not puréed)

  • Abidjan cabbage salade

    • Wlow on August 13, 2017

      Good, refreshing

  • Lebanese vegetable soup

    • Wlow on August 13, 2017

      10/92 very good

  • Baked fish Nicosia

    • Vanessa on June 10, 2011

      I made this with mahi-mahi. Boy, was it every good, and EASY! The seasoned breadcrumbs were delicious and something I will do again (they go great over pasta, too.) Many thanks to Eat Your Books, because I would *never* have found this recipe if I was just browsing through my books looking for something to do with a slab of fish.

  • Rumpledethumps

    • Rutabaga on March 27, 2017

      This is a good dish for using up vegetable odds and ends. You really can't go wrong mixing them in with mashed potatoes and topping with cheese. I think this works best with broccoli (as written) or cauliflower, but I have also made it using primarily white cabbage. It's not as flavorful as the broccoli version (nor does my five-year-old appreciate it), but it's an easy way to incorporate cabbage into a warm, filling meal.

  • Yellowman's banana lime bread

    • Rutabaga on August 17, 2014

      This is a nice banana bread, but not the best; I would probably prefer a regular banana bread recipe with added coconut. The odd thing was the glaze was very tart. If I were to make it again, I would cut the lime juice in half.

  • Five-spice tofu

    • wester on February 25, 2011

      This was a nice tofu variation, with a good aniseed flavor. Still, next time I think I will make the marinade a bit more concentrated. Make sure the pan/dish you use for marinating is quite snug, as it's only a cup of liquid and otherwise the liquid level can get very low. Note to Dutchies, Indonesians, and people with extremely well-stocked cupboards: If you use Ketjap Manis, you can do without the molasses.

  • Spicy Bulgarian tomato dumpling soup (domatene supa)

    • Rutabaga on November 23, 2015

      This soup is made a little heartier than the typical tomato soup by the addition of couscous dumplings. The dumplings, while tasty, have come out a little dense for me. Maybe a little more milk would help. I used canned tomatoes, setting aside the juice, along with a little extra water, to use in place of vegetable broth. This makes for an intensely tomato-flavored dish, more so, I think, than if you were to make the soup with fresh tomatoes.

  • Bosnian "meatballs" in yogurt sauce

    • wester on July 18, 2011

      This was very nice, with a distinctly "Slavic" flavor. The "meat" browned nicely and the yogurt sauce (basically a yogurt custard with dill) was a real finishing touch. The sauce did take some time, but it was worth it. The recipe made a lot: The amount given easily fed five adults and five kids aged 1-5, with a bit of rice and a tomato salad. I did not bother forming the mixture into balls, but just spread it out over the baking sheet. This worked out fine. I also left out the breadcrumbs, used slivered almonds instead of ground, and replaced the carrots with one yellow and one red pepper.

  • Macedonian cottage cheese croquettes

    • Krisage on November 11, 2011

      These were super yummy, if calorific. We just grabbed various condiments that we had on hand (thai chili sauce, harissa, marinara) and all were tasty atop the croquettes. We made just one small alteration; to try and minimize the caloric impact, we used only 2 T oil to pan fry the entire batch. Still, we calculated nearly 1800 calories for the recipe before adding our toppings of choice. So, next time we'll have a couple on the side with a main-course salad as opposed to 6 each for dinner. ; )

  • Romanian carrots with sour cream

    • Rutabaga on November 19, 2015

      This is an easy, pleasing way to dress up common carrots. We ate it warm, but I think it would work well as a cold dish, too.

  • Beet and horseradish salad

    • eve_kloepper on October 29, 2011

      add some finely minced red onion. this improves an already very good dish.

  • Blueberry yogurt pie

    • Rutabaga on July 30, 2015

      This pie is simple to make, and the lightly sweetened blueberry and tangy yogurt custard make for a lovely summer dessert. This style of crust is also very forgiving.

  • Eggplant, red pepper, and spinach curry

    • wester on May 20, 2011

      This was OK, nice but unspectacular. The colors were very nice. I did not think the eggplant was very noticeable in this one, I might just leave it out next time. Also, the sauce was a bit thin, so I will also leave out most or all of the added water.

    • MMarlean on August 12, 2010

      The eggplant cubes soaked up too much of the spices. Although I loved the spice combination, the intensity in the eggplant was too much. Would like to try the recipe again either cooking the eggplant before adding to mixture or substituting zucchini for the eggplant.

  • Pasta e fagioli

    • BPfahnl on June 14, 2010

      I can't count the number of times I've made this over the years. It is probably my favorite all time comfort food! I make it with Barilla Plus penne pasta and Muir Glen canned tomatoes. I even make it in the winter.

  • Fettuccini with creamy Gorgonzola sauce

    • Rutabaga on February 12, 2015

      It may not be authentically Italian, but this is a wonderful easy pasta dish, and very adaptable. The cream cheese tempers the gorgonzola, making it a dish that even those who don't prefer blue cheese may enjoy.

  • Spinach with pine nuts and raisins

  • Tomato, lime, and tortilla soup

    • louie734 on August 03, 2014

      This recipe appears, very slightly tweaked, in the new Moosewood Restaurant Favorites cookbook. Changes include the addition of some ground coriander and oregano with the cumin, and the helpful notes that water can be substituted for vegetable stock if using summertime fresh tomatoes, and 28oz canned tomatoes can be used when fresh aren't available or very good. When using canned tomatoes, decrease the amount of water/stock by 1 cup.

  • Creamy corn soup

    • Rutabaga on September 18, 2017

      It's a blessing when I find a healthful dish that everyone in the family happily eats, and this soup fit the bill. As with most soups, it's easy to make in advance. With some good bread on the side, it can stand in as a light supper. I added some chopped rotisserie chicken to give it some protein.

  • Zucchini-avocado salad

    • Nancith on March 02, 2015

      This was very refreshing, & enjoyed by all. I was a bit skeptical because of the combination of ingredients, but it's definitely a winner. Since I had excess lime juice to use, that replaced the lemon juice. This Mexican recipe would be great alongside tacos or quesadillas.

  • Flounder rolls with tomatoes, almonds, and cilantro

    • wester on October 02, 2011

      As lovely as the ingredients suggest, but not much more. I thought the dried tomatoes were a bit overpowering, I would have liked to taste more of the almonds instead.

  • Tortilla casserole

    • Rutabaga on October 07, 2014

      This recipe lends itself well to improvisation. I have substituted all or part of the cream for sour cream, used flour tortillas, cheddar cheese, and canned or pureed tomatoes. Often, I'll add beans or ground taco spiced meat to increase the protein and make it more of a main dish. Use it as a starting point to use up extra tortillas and taco fillings. It can easily be prepared in advance, and is a crowd pleaser.

  • Potato-leek vinaigrette

    • Rutabaga on May 29, 2017

      This was a surprisingly delightful version of potato salad, made on a whim when I was looking for a dish that used both leeks and red peppers, and possibly dill (thanks, Eat Your Books!). I used red potatoes, Tuscan olive oil, and Espelt white wine vinegar, and the salad was fresh and zingy, just right for an early summer evening. It's quite easy to put together, and, like most vinegar-based potato salads, I imagine the flavor will deepen overnight. The leeks are wonderful here - sweet and silky, with a gentle onion perfume.

  • Egyptian bean and vegetable soup

    • Westy2 on October 10, 2013

      This is a wonderful soup. Very fast and easy. Make it a meal and serve alongside a loaf of French bread.

    • life2great on January 21, 2014

      This was wonderful! I made this soup in the pressure cooker after doing a fast soak of mixed market beans which I substituted for the fava. I cooked it on high for approximately 12 minutes and did a quick release to relieve the steam. Served with Southern corn bread it was wonderful on a cold, snowy, winter night!

  • Whole braised garlic

    • Rutabaga on November 26, 2014

      This was the first recipe I used to roast garlic, and the low heat really helps the cloves caramelize into golden, buttery goodness. However, I find it takes longer than the recipe suggests by 15 to 30 minutes. You could decrease the cooking time by increasing the over temperature to 325. Also, the type of dish you use (I use Pyrex) may affect the braising time.

  • Indonesian squash and spinach soup

    • wester on December 12, 2010

      A nice thick soup (or light vegetable stew) with a distinct Indonesian flavor.

  • Indonesian egg or tofu curry

    • wester on September 23, 2013

      Very tasty, but it needs two things not in the recipe: the juice of half a lime to improve the acid balance, and a pinch of turmeric to correct the unappetizing beige color. The six people this recipe should feed would be as one of many dishes - with rice and a salad this serves about two as a main dish.

  • Risotto with asparagus

    • Wlow on August 13, 2017

      7/92 Very good. Added asparagus pieces and tops a bit later than recipe called for.

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  • ISBN 10 0671679902
  • ISBN 13 9780671679903
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Dec 01 1990
  • Format Paperback
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Simon & Schuster

Publishers Text

Since its opening in 1973, Moosewood Restaurant in Ithaca, New York, has been synonymous with creative cuisine with a healthful, vegetarian emphasis. Each Sunday at Moosewood Restaurant, diners experience a new ethnic or regional cuisine, sometimes exotic, sometimes familiar. From the highlands and grasslands of Africa to the lush forests of Eastern Europe, from the sun-drenched hills of Provence to the mountains of South America, the inventive cooks have drawn inspiration for these delicious adaptations of traditional recipes.

Including a section on cross-cultural menu planning as well as an extensive guide to ingredients, techniques, and equipment, Sundays at Moosewood Restaurant offers a taste for every palate. Moosewood Restaurant is run by a group of 18 people who rotate through the jobs necessary to make a restaurant work. They plan menus, set long-term goals, and wash pots.



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