The Essential Cuisines of Mexico: Revised and updated by Diana Kennedy

Search this book for Recipes »

Notes about this book

  • chawkins on June 13, 2013

    Notable recipes per 101 Classic Cookbooks: flan a la Antigua, Mexican rice, mole poblano de guajalate, pato en mole verde de pepita, pozole de Jalisco, salsa de jitamate cocida, sopa de Lima.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Chilorio (chile-seasoned pork)

    • evergreengirl on November 17, 2012

      Kinda bland, but great with jalepeno salsa in tacos!

    • lina on December 12, 2013

      I just made this and didn't think it was bland at all.

  • Salsa de albanil

    • TrishaCP on August 11, 2015

      This was a spicy, tasty, and easy appetizer. It uses the book's salsa verde recipe, and then you just add queso fresco and avocado on top. We ate this with tortillas as part of a small dishes dinner.

  • Enchiladas de jalisco

    • minerva on April 10, 2014

      I like the technique, however: at least twice as much sauce should be made, and overall it was bland. I don't think more chiles is the answer, the gentle heat was nice, it needs more depth. Toasted garlic cloves in the sauce? Spices the broth?

  • Enchiladas verdes (green enchiladas)

    • Dannausc on April 29, 2018

      Good, a lot of steps. I’d never made a salsa verde with peanuts. It added a nice touch.

  • Chilaquiles de aguascalientes

    • sarahkalsbeek on June 21, 2020

      This is very delicious, though we did make a few changes to please a preschooler's palate. Only a small spoonful of chipotle sauce from the can, 4 broiled roma tomatoes instead of 2, and a spoonful of Frontera's tomatillo salsa instead of cooked tomate verde. We also used corn chips instead of tortillas. So we veered fairly far from the recipe, but still it was so, so delicious!

  • Budin azteca (moctezuma pie)

    • chennes on July 31, 2010

      The recipe does not call for flour tortillas, of course, but rather for fresh corn tortillas. Nor does it call for a "whole chicken": it calls for shredded poached chicken.

    • jodies on February 10, 2015

      Delicious! Will definitely make again.

  • Puerco en salsa de jitomate (shredded pork and tomato filling for tacos)

    • FJT on July 13, 2015

      Very easy to make and very tasty. I cooked the pork for longer than stated (after 45 minutes it really wasn't very tender, so I left it for another 30) and I used passata as a shortcut instead of fresh tomatoes. Made a lovely taco filling and I will definitely be making it again!

  • Tamales de frijol nortenos (northern bean tamales)

    • dprostrollo on January 02, 2020

      Made the filling, really good and quite spicy so make sure you've got enough cheese/sour cream/etc. to balance.

  • Sopa de lentejas estilo queretaro (lentil soup)

    • TrishaCP on February 04, 2015

      This was complicated for a lentil soup (you use 3 pots/skillets, plus dirty a blender), but the outcome is delicious. Definitely recommended if you are looking for a twist to lentil soup and can source fresh nopales. I am currently in Mexico City, and not used to cooking at high altitude, so my lentils took forever to cook- at least the 3 hours mentioned by Mrs. Kennedy. I can't imagine needing to cook them that long where I usually live in Washington, DC. The nopales are cooked separately and it did work to remove some of their sliminess- they added a brightness that was very pleasant in the soup.

  • Fresh corn and poblano soup (Sopa de elote y rajas)

    • TrishaCP on August 02, 2015

      It is hard to beat plain grilled corn in the summer, when the corn here is so sweet and luscious, but I was having a dinner party and wanted to do something special. This soup is amazing- it had the taste of pure corn with the mild spice of the poblano and just a touch of brightness from the tomatoes. It is quite a few steps, but all of them had purpose, and the end result was worth it.

    • FJT on October 07, 2014

      Lovely flavours - the sweetness of the corn versus the spicy poblano chilli works very well. Seemed like it took a long time to prep all the components and for all that work you only get 6 bowls of soup, so when I make it next time I'll be doubling the recipe and freezing some!

    • meggan on February 08, 2020

      Easy and tasty. I only use two poblanos and it was spicy enough. Also I just used a good quality fire roasted chopped Roma tomato and browned it instead of the book recipe.

  • Sopa tarasca tipo conde (Tarascan bean and tortilla soup)

    • jdjd99 on January 18, 2020

      Delicious. I used leftover mixed beans (chickpeas, kidney, and black beans) from another recipe. I used canned roasted tomatoes (2 cans). Added shredded rotisserie chicken to the bowls with the cheese, then ladled the soup over.

  • Frijoles refritos a la veracruzana (veracruz refried beans)

    • Dannausc on April 29, 2018

      Good and easy. I liked it quite a bit better than the well-fried beans.

  • Arroz a la Mexicana (Mexican rice)

    • Dannausc on April 29, 2018

      Really good.

  • Arroz blanco (white rice)

    • Breadcrumbs on May 06, 2011

      p. 161 Though this is called white rice the recipe name doesn’t do the dish justice as the rice isn’t as neutral as the name might imply.I elected to add the carrots along w the onions and garlic and, since I was using frozen peas, I just added them prior to serving and tossed until they heated through. I increased the quantity of peas to approx 1/3 cup. Though fairly straightforward in terms of prep and ingredients, the final dish was quite tasty. I’d make this dish again without hesitation. We served this alongside the Penchugas De Pollo Con Rajas (Chicken Breasts w Poblano Chiles and Cream) from p. 347 of this book which didn’t impress us as much as this rice did. Rice photos here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/691340#6518019

  • Sopa seca de fideo (dry angel hair pasta "soup")

    • PrincessK on July 29, 2010

      Per DivingDiva brown coils of fideos until deep golden, drain. Blend tomatoes, onion, garlic, salt and fry in same pan and oil that fideos were. When hot and somewhat reduced add the cooked fideos back in along with some chicken stock, cover and simmer until most of the liquid has been absorbed. Transfer mixture to a baking dish, cut chiles chipotles en adobo into strips and tuck into the fideos, drizzle with crema, cover and bake about 15-20 min. Garnish with more crema, onion rings, crumbled cotija. It's great by itself, or with a green salad. Also pairs well with chicken, pork, shrimp and eggs (especially fried or poached). It's a good potluck dish and is a nice change of pace from rice and potatoes. Can be served hot or cold, I prefer hot. I usually have to add more liquid for the baking stage and sometimes I just add the chipotles to the tomatos when I blend them. It's not really a quick to fix dish, but it is easy and really tasty

  • Lentejas con pina y platano (lentils with pineapple and plantain)

    • Breadcrumbs on May 09, 2011

      p. 167 The unusual (at least to me!) combination of lentils, plantain and pineapple is what drew me to this recipe. My prep time was significantly shorter in duration than that indicated by DK and the reason was that my green lentils cooked in 30 mins vs the suggested 2.5-3hours that DK suggests.I tasted the cooked tomato mixture prior to incorporating the fruit and I loved the almost smoky flavour. It’s a shame those flavours were lost w the incorporation of the pineapple. While we enjoyed the final dish, we did find that the pineapple flavour was predominant and the tomato was lost somewhere along the way. We enjoyed the potato-like texture of the plantains. I’m confident I’ll enjoy this dish as a breakfast but it was a little too sweet for a side dish for our tastes. I’m still waiting for DK to knock my socks off!

  • Yucatecan jicama salad (Ensalada de jicama Yucateca)

    • minerva on November 13, 2014

      Solid fresh tasting salad. Good along side rich foods.

  • Salsa de tomate verde (Mexican green tomato sauce)

    • TrishaCP on August 11, 2015

      I usually prefer red salsas but prepared this for the salsa de albanil recipe. Served with the cheese and avocado, its sharpness was welcome. The book has a variation to roast the tomatillos (rather than boiling them), and I think the roasting would be preferable if you are serving this straight up on its own.

  • Salsa ranchera (tomato sauce)

    • Yildiz100 on May 15, 2018

      Very nice as a sauce for huevos rancheros.

  • Tinga poblana con carne de puerco (shredded savory pork)

    • FJT on September 14, 2016

      This is a lovely recipe that came together very quickly. I pressure cooked the pork for 25 minutes at high pressure and assembled the rest while it was cooking. Very tasty indeed.

    • LittleTex on September 23, 2020

      Fresh thyme is a really nice flavor component. I would increase the amount of tomatoes. Served over crumbled tortilla chips with avocado and queso fresco. It did not last long in my house.

    • TrishaCP on October 08, 2016

      This was delicious! I didn't use my pressure cooker for the pork, and found that I needed to cook the pork for at least double the time specified to get it tender. (I used pork shoulder from the farmer's market, which tends to be tougher than supermarket pork.) I only used one chipotle since my chorizo was already very spicy, and the dish was still quite hot. I served this with tortillas and beans and avocados.

  • Chuletas de puerco adobados (pork chops seasosned with adobo paste)

    • Breadcrumbs on May 09, 2011

      p. 273 - I used a boneless leg of lamb vs pork. In DK’s recipe you are to fry the chops the following day however I wanted to grill our lamb. DK suggests serving w some thinly sliced white onions, sliced radishes and shredded lettuce. I skipped the lettuce and grilled my onions also served the Lentils w Pineapple and Plantain alongside this dish. To start I made a spring-inspired Sweet Pea and Avocado Guacamole which was really yummy. This was good but not great. The adobo was a bit sharp for our tastes and was balanced somewhat by the sweetness of the grilled onions which had caramelized. Not sure if DK’s method of frying the meat in lard might have cut through that sharpness but I’ll wait for someone else to try this and let me know. As it stands, I don’t see us having this again. So far DK’s recipes have failed to really impress me. Photos here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/691343#6523672

  • Carne de res con col (ground beef with cabbage)

    • wcassity on November 30, 2020

      Delicious. Used .75 lbs of ground beef. Served as filling for soft tacos.

    • minerva on September 04, 2014

      This is fast and inexpensive as a taco filling.

  • Carne claveteada (pot roast studded with almonds and bacon)

    • amraub on October 31, 2012

      Sauce wasn't quite as flavourful as I had hoped it would be, but beef came out very nicely - incredibly tender and rich. I used crossrib instead of brisket and added a bit extra water during the first cooking time.

  • Pechugas de pollo con rajas (chicken breasts with poblano chiles and cream)

    • Breadcrumbs on May 06, 2011

      p. 347 - Essentially I followed the recipe without any significant modifications. I did use sour cream as creme fraiche was not available and though my sauce didn’t curdle in the blender, it did curdle during the cooking process. The recipe calls for 1/4 cup of butter and 1/4 cup of olive oil. I reduced these quantities by half without incident. I topped our dish w cheddar and served the Arroz Blanco/White Rice from p. 161 of this book. We liked but didn’t love this dish. It’s the first recipe I’ve made from this book so I’m not sure how the flavours compare to those of other dishes however we did find this a little bland. I also found the congealed sauce to be somewhat off-putting. If I were to try this again, I'd use Creme Fraiche. Photos here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/691344#6518027

  • Huachinango a la veracruzana (veracruz red snapper)

    • TrishaCP on February 09, 2015

      A classic and this version does not disappoint- the flavors are bright without being too acidic and no one robust flavor overpowers another. I only marinated my fish for about 30 minutes before cooking, but that seemed to be sufficient. I didn't have pickled jalapeños, so I marinated fresh jalapeños in vinegar before adding to the sauce.

  • Camarones en pipian (shrimp in pumpkin seed sauce)

    • TrishaCP on August 23, 2014

      Absolutely delicious- the best thing I have cooked in ages! I used the full complement of chiles called for (in my case, jalapeños and not serrano since that was what I had on hand), and it bordered on being too spicy. So, if you are on the sensitive side, definitely consider dialing back.

  • Mangoes flameados (flambeed mangoes)

    • amraub on January 22, 2012

      A little too much orange for my tastes. Served with ice cream which did a great job of keeping it from being too acidic.

  • Margarita

    • Yildiz100 on April 14, 2013

      good but a bit tart

  • Agua fresca de flor de jamaica (Jamaica flower water)

    • TrishaCP on July 10, 2016

      Wonderful- the best version of this drink that I have tried. I may try with canela next time.

  • Café de olla (coffee with cinnamon and brown sugar)

    • TrishaCP on January 30, 2018

      Good, but I recommend grating the piloncillo in advance if you aren't good in the morning before you have your coffee!

You must Create an Account or Sign In to add a note to this book.

Reviews about this book

This book does not currently have any reviews.

  • ISBN 10 0609603558
  • ISBN 13 9780609603550
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Apr 26 2001
  • Format Hardcover
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Random House USA Inc
  • Imprint Crown Publications

Publishers Text

More than 25 years ago, when Diana Kennedy published The Cuisines of Mexico, knowledge and appreciation of authentic Mexican cooking were in their infancy. But change was in the air. Home cooks turned to Julia Child for an introduction to French cuisine; to Marcella Hazan for the tastes of Italy; and through Diana Kennedy they discovered a delicious and highly developed culinary tradition they barely knew existed, making her books bestsellers.


Today, with the rediscovery of Mexican food, and with increased Mexican immigration into the U.S. and a far greater availability of ingredients, the time is right for this indispensable cookbook. In addition to the hundreds of original recipes--all updated--that sparked a culinary revolution, the book contains more than 30 new recipes that establish this book as the definitive Mexican cookbook for today's home cooks.



Other cookbooks by this author