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The Baking Bible by Rose Levy Beranbaum

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Notes about this book

  • bgbmus on December 27, 2015

    I made the Apple Pie, my first encounter with Beranbaum's recipes. It is painstaking, extremely detailed, and labor intensive. When my friends arrived, I told them that if they'd describe the pie as anything other than absolutely exceptional, we'd burn the book. We all agreed, it was absolutely exceptional. It's was, of course, the best apple pie I have ever tasted.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Blueberry buckle

    • Zosia on August 13, 2015

      I made a rookie mistake and left the sugar out of the cake. The sugar!! Amazingly, this dessert was still pretty good. The "cake" was more like a biscuit in texture which was not a bad thing served with delicious lemony roasted blueberries. I said nothing, dusted the top of each serving liberally with powdered sugar, and watched as everyone devoured it. I can only imagine how fantastic this would be if made correctly.

    • anya_sf on July 15, 2018

      I was serving it for breakfast, so I used white whole wheat flour and lowfat yogurt. Next time I'd also reduce the sugar in the blueberries. It took over 45 minutes for the topping to be completely cooked. We really enjoyed it.

  • Cran-raspberry upside-down cake

    • joanhuguet on February 24, 2015

      Unfortunately, this one did not work for me. I felt that the caramel and the sweet raspberry jam overpowered the bracing acidity that I want in a cranberry dessert. The cake texture was a bit odd and dense, as well. More baking powder needed, I think.

  • Rhubarb upside-down cake with strawberry meringue

    • Zosia on January 25, 2015

      Nice balance of vanilla cake and tart topping. I loved the idea of the meringue instead of whipped cream but it was a little sweet....perhaps unsweetened fruit puree instead of preserves/jam would be better. Also, the rhubarb yielded very little liquid while it macerated but lots while it baked; the cake was almost self-syruping as it absorbed the pool of liquid that came out of the pan with it and was very moist as a result. This looked pretty the day it was made but the rhubarb could have used some sort of glaze on day 2 to brighten it up.

  • Cream cheese butter cake

    • Zosia on October 29, 2014

      Easy to make and delicious with the most velvety crumb I've ever produced. Definitely a keeper.

  • Light lemon curd buttercream

    • Zosia on October 29, 2014

      Made by beating butter into a batch of lemon curd, it retains the tart, lemony goodness of the curd but acquires the creaminess of a more conventional buttercream. A half batch covered the cream cheese butter cake perfectly.

  • White Christmas peppermint cake

    • Zosia on December 21, 2014

      If you're a fan of white chocolate peppermint bark, you'll love this peppermint flavoured white cake with white chocolate buttercream that relies on crushed candy canes for much of its visual impact and flavour. The cake is finely crumbed and moist, and the buttercream rich and creamy but a little spongy so I couldn't achieve a perfectly smooth finish even with a warmed bench scraper. The layers of chopped candy partially melted into the buttercream make for a very pretty slice.

  • The red velvet rose

    • Zosia on November 19, 2014

      The photo on the back of the book led me to dig up my much underused rose-shaped bundt pan to make this cake. Not normally a fan of red velvet, I've discovered that a little extra cocoa powder in the cake and a raspberry glaze give it new life. You do want to glaze the cake several hours before serving since it takes that long for the raspberry sauce, which looks like far too much when it's first applied, to absorb into the cake.

  • Marble in reverse with custom Rose blend ganache glaze

    • Zosia on August 10, 2015

      I didn't quite see the point of this cake. It looked like a marble cake but tasted like a good chocolate cake with a delicious ganache glaze. The vanilla portion was completely overwhelmed by all the chocolate.

  • The chocolate FloRo elegance with caramel buttercream

    • Zosia on January 04, 2015

      A chocolate-caramel confection that's worth every minute (and a lot of them are required!) of making it. The chocolate cake is incredibly light and tender and is complemented perfectly by the white chocolate-caramel buttercream. It wasn't quite as intensely chocolatey as I expected based on the description but the chocolate glaze helped. Be warned, with the multi-component buttercream and glaze, making the parts, cooling them to the correct temperature, and assembling the cake was almost an all-day affair.

  • Double damage oblivion

    • Smokeydoke on March 05, 2018

      This is the hardest cake I've made to date. It is a flourless chocolate cake sandwiched between a regular chocolate cake and everything is covered in a chocolate ganache. Chocolate mania, it obliterated my chocolate craving for months. Surprisingly, it is not too sweet. Did I like it? Yes, but I did not love it. It's a decadent cake, a feat of baking, but it's not my favorite. It does not beat out the classic American chocolate cake from Ms. Fields.

  • Molasses crumb cakelets

    • gastronom on January 16, 2015

      Excellent flavor, a little too sweet. Did not have the required size pans. This may have contributed to the cakelets falling apart and much longer baking time.

  • Banana split chiffon cake

    • Zosia on November 02, 2014

      This cake is as ethereal as the author promises - so tender it's actually a bit wobbly! Though I used the recommended pan size, my batter was very close to the top before baking and the cake rose and developed a mushroom top during baking; removal from the pan was quite the challenge. The suggested accoutrements sound like a fun way to serve it, but I loved it plain.

  • Strawberry shortcake Génoise

    • swegener on May 01, 2015

      This was my first genoise cake and it was both harder and easier than I thought. Most of the steps are just fidly, not hard. The hardest part for me was folding the flour in--I mistakenly used a spatula when I should have used a whisk. The whole think turned out quite well--I doubled the strawberries for the top and it was gorgeous with the glaze.

    • anya_sf on July 16, 2018

      I made the mini strawberry shortcakes. I had never used my mini Marianne pan before and think I overbaked the genoise, as it turned out dry, even with the syrup. Otherwise, all the components were delicious, but next time I'll make the large version to get more strawberries in each serving. I didn't have any problems mixing the genoise batter; the instructions were easy to follow. Be sure to read the recipe before starting, as this requires advance preparation.

  • Chocolate cuddle cake

    • Jane on February 08, 2015

      This looked good but not really my kind of cake. The sponge is very light and airy - I prefer mine denser and fudgier. The Kahlua flavored ganache around the sides was good. The caramel cream topping was also nice. I just didn't really feel the results were worth the amount of effort. Also the top of my cake shrunk in (though I followed the very detailed instructions to the letter) so it was more of a mound than a straight-sided cake.

  • Irish cream scones

    • anya_sf on May 27, 2018

      I made these with white whole wheat flour. I froze the shaped dough overnight and baked them straight from the freezer; they just needed a few extra minutes in the oven. While not as light as white flour scones, the whole wheat version was still quite tender, with a slightly nutty taste. My family enjoyed them. The lemon zest really adds a nice flavor.

  • Flaky cream cheese scones

    • Zosia on April 17, 2015

      The dough required quite a bit of handling to come together and was quite stiff when it finally did; rolling it out was easier than pressing it into shape. Surprisingly, it baked up into moist, tender and flaky scones as promised, but they were a bit too rich and sweet for me.

  • Perfect peach galette

    • anya_sf on July 22, 2018

      The crust dough was rather dry and I had to add another tablespoon of liquid to get the crumbs to hold together. It cracked a lot when rolling, but I just patched it together and it worked. It was super tender and fairly flaky, and the filling tasted divine, with a lovely fresh peach flavor.

  • Sour cherry pie

    • bching on November 15, 2014

      The concentrated cherry juice is a good addition. Lovely filling. I skipped the lattice in favor of a basic top crust.

    • TrishaCP on December 26, 2015

      I didn't make the crust in this recipe, or have the concentrated cherry juice, but this was still the best sour cherry pie I've ever made. I too used a basic top crust and it worked just fine.

  • Black and blueberry pie

    • anya_sf on August 26, 2018

      The pie turned out perfectly, with plenty of berry filling. It sliced fairly neatly. Not too sweet - perfect with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

  • Bluerhu pie

    • anya_sf on May 29, 2018

      Having made this cream cheese pie crust several times before, I knew it took some faith to believe that loose crumbs would form an actual rollable crust. This time it seemed to take a bit more kneading but worked out fine in the end. The crust was flaky, tender, and delicious, and also nicely browned on the bottom. The blueberry-rhubarb filling was just lovely, with the perfect sweetness - not too tart on its own, but not too sweet to pair with vanilla ice cream. The only thing I'd change next time would be to increase the filling by 50%, as this is a shallow pie, and that filling was so delicious.

  • Pomegranate winter chiffon meringue pie

    • Zosia on July 30, 2018

      This turned into an all-day project because of the various cooling/chilling times of the 4 components. Family and guests raved about it. I thought it was good but I'm not quite convinced that it was worth the effort. (I prefer RLB's raspberry chiffon pie from the Pie and Pastry bible). I made the variation with the lemon cookie crust and baked it in a tart pan.

  • Lemon cookie crust

    • Zosia on July 29, 2018

      Note that dough requires minimum 8 hours refrigeration, in stages, before baking.

  • Pizza rustica

    • PiaOC on April 10, 2015

      Great addition to an antipasto platter. Easy recipe to follow. I was surprised that passing the ricotta through a sieve made it so much smoother. Loved the combination of sweet pastry and savoury filling. It was also good with a salad a couple of days later.

  • My chocolate chip cookies

    • anya_sf on August 25, 2018

      I made the dough one day ahead as recommended. I didn't bother dividing it in half (didn't see the point), just put all of it in a storage container from whence I scooped out the cookies. Baked for the minimum time, the cookies were soft and very slightly crispy on the edges - good, but not chewy like my favorite cookie recipe, maybe due to a lower ratio of sugar. The browned butter flavor came through and there are plenty of chocolate chips. I appreciated the smaller yield and small cookie size (so we didn't feel guilty about eating more than one).

  • Coconut crisps

    • Zosia on August 30, 2017

      Very nice cookies that weren't too sweet, had a pleasant crisp texture and tasted of coconut. They were also easy to make using a food processor. Some chilling time is required before baking and here I deviated from the instructions by rolling the dough out before refrigerating. I cut some larger (3") for ice cream sandwiches made with RLB's pure passion ice cream from the pie and pastry bible.

  • Cadillac Café milk chocolate bread pudding

    • anya_sf on May 28, 2018

      I used leftover baguette slices which were about 3/8" thick, rather than 1/4", using 5 per pudding. I knew they weren't going to look as pretty, but thought they'd work otherwise. However, I followed the rest of the instructions too precisely and the puddings did not come out evenly textured. What I should have done: soak the bread slices in shallower dishes to get more evenly coated with custard; and make sure the bread softens all the way before baking so that the bread melds with the custard better and doesn't rise up in the ramekins during baking. I used half cream, half milk (slightly less rich), and about 2/3 milk chocolate, 1/3 semi-sweet chocolate. I don't always like milk chocolate, but did enjoy the flavor here, as it was not too sweet.

  • Rum raisin French toast royale

    • Zosia on April 10, 2015

      The delicious loaf of cinnamon swirl raisin bread needed to complete the recipe didn't last long enough to generate any stale slices for French toast so the review is for the bread alone. I'm not certain the beaten egg was needed to prevent the cinnamon sugar and dough from separating during baking - I've made other recipes that didn't include it that turned out well; I used the leftover to glaze the loaf. This dough recipe is also used in the white chocolate club med bread (page 447) so I doubled it and made a loaf of each.

  • White chocolate Club Med bread

    • Zosia on April 10, 2015

      For white chocolate lovers. As chawkins noted, the dough is quite easy to work with and bakes up nicely. I loved the technique of wrapping the chocolate-filled loaf in a "sheet" of plain dough to prevent exposed pieces of chocolate from over-browning. I'm tempted to try this on fruit-filled loaves where the exposed dried fruit often burns as the loaf bakes. The cinnamon raisin bread for the rum raisin French toast (page 440) uses the same dough recipe - not very sweet but butter-rich with a very soft crumb.

    • chawkins on March 29, 2015

      The loaf turned out beautifully, the dough was quite easy to work with. But I guess I'm just not a fan of white chocolate, I'm not enamored with this loaf, will not make again.

  • Babka

    • anya_sf on May 29, 2018

      I accidentally forgot the butter in the almond filling, but it turned out great anyway. Delicious and not too sweet.

    • lkgrover on August 16, 2015

      Made 8/14/2015 for a Saturday brunch with sixteen people. Babka with almond filling is not too sweet, so perfect for brunch. Received many compliments. I recommend making the biga (starter) and doing the first proofing the night before baking (if you're baking is limited to evenings after work). Doing it all in one night leads to a very late night!

  • Monkey dunkey bread

    • Smokeydoke on February 25, 2018

      I love Rose but she has completely idiot-proofed this recipe. If you're an experienced baker, it's ok to use your instinct, I did, and I came out with a darn tasty bread. You can probably skip 20% of the steps here. They are unnecessary and time-consuming.

    • Smokeydoke on February 25, 2018

      I love Rose's brioche dough. It is the best brioche dough I've ever made. She tells you every.single.detail. so there's no way you can mess it up. The monkey bread is a gilded version of her bread, it's filled with chocolate, then coated with a delicious brown sugar glaze, and finally topped with caramel. Even with all the adornments, the final product is not overly sweet. It is oh-so-fluffy and delicious. I omitted the final drizzle of caramel. Photo included.

  • 100% whole wheat walnut loaf

    • gastronom on January 16, 2015

      Very good flavor. Dense. Probably would be better baked in cast iron dutch oven, which would enhance crust.

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Reviews about this book

  • Food52

    2015 Piglet Community Pick. I have never considered myself much of a baker, but with my friend Rose’s expert guidance, I am certainly getting better!

    Full review
  • Saveur.com

    ...it revealed itself to be a treasure both for experienced bakers and novices alike. Beranbaum gladly takes the reader by the hand with an introduction that includes “golden rules” for baking...

    Full review
  • Tasting Table

    These seven words will have hard-core bakers jumping for joy: Rose Levy Beranbaum has a new book. And when the revered baking authority writes a book, it's an encyclopedic thing of buttery beauty...

    Full review
  • ISBN 10 1118338618
  • ISBN 13 9781118338612
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Oct 28 2014
  • Format Hardcover
  • Page Count 512
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Publishers Text

The latest and most comprehensive baking book yet from best-selling author and "diva of desserts" Rose Levy Beranbaum

Legendary baker Rose Levy Beranbaum is back with her most extensive "bible" yet. With all-new recipes for the best cakes, pies, tarts, cookies, candies, pastries, breads, and more, this magnum opus draws from Rose's passion and expertise in every category of baking. As is to be expected from the woman who's been called "the most meticulous cook who ever lived," each sumptuous recipe is truly foolproof--with detail-oriented instructions that eliminate guesswork, "plan-aheads," ingenious tips, and highlights for success. From simple everyday crowd-pleasers (Coffee Crumb Cake Muffins, Gingersnaps, Gooseberry Crisp) to show-stopping stunners (Chocolate Hazelnut Mousse Tart, Mango Bango Cheesecake, White Christmas Peppermint Cake) to bakery-style pastries developed for the home kitchen (the famous French Kouign Amann), every recipe proves that delicious perfection is within reach for any baker.



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