Cook It In Cast Iron: Kitchen-Tested Recipes for the One Pan That Does It All by Editors of Cook's Country Magazine

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Notes about this book

  • eliza on January 12, 2018

    I used their method to season a brand new skillet using flax oil. This proved to be quite straightforward and worked well. I made an omelet the following day and there was no sticking at all!

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Teriyaki chicken thighs

    • mamacrumbcake on September 17, 2019

      This resulted in chicken that was dense and firm, with somewhat flabby skin, not the “crisp skin and juicy meat” of the recipe description. I’m skeptical about the merits of weighing the chicken down with the Dutch oven. The Dutch oven seemed to act as a cover, causing the chicken to stew in its own juice, rather than to become crisp. Also, the Dutch oven, weighted down with cans, seemed to squeeze all the juices out of the chicken. It was acceptable but not great. The teriyaki sauce, however, was delicious. PS I did not experience the sticking mentioned by sscholl and clawsgirl.

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      The dutch oven I used for weighing down the chicken was a couple inches smaller than the one that they used for this recipe, and so not all of the skin got pressed into the skillet. The recipe was a bit frustrating, because it was absolutely delicious, but I had several problems with it. The biggest problem was that the chicken kept sticking to the pan. Maybe it was because I was using chicken thighs that had very recently been defrosted and probably had some moisture still on it. Maybe I simply need to add more oil. Either way, that ultracrisp skin promise only came to fruition on a couple of the thighs. However! The sauce? Divine. Absolutely delicious. I plan on cooking this again to see if I can fix the sticking problem.

    • sscholl on January 27, 2019

      The previous reader is right, the Dutch oven thing was tricky, but in my case because the rendered grease splashed out of the skillet and risked creating a fire. Keep watch on it and pour out most of the grease if this starts. Mine didn’t stick too badly but I let them be - there’s a little window between undone and burnt when meat releases. You can kinda smell it. Having said that, two of my thighs did burn a bit :/ I’d make this again, though. It was really delicious.

  • Steak tips with mushroom-onion gravy

    • KitKatCat on November 30, 2019

      Tasty, we enjoyed it over noodles

  • Filets mignons with peppercorn cream sauce

    • stef on August 16, 2017

      Cooked the filet just the way we liked it. Our go to recipe

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      A+ all around. The steaks were perfect (although I did take them off at 110, since my boyfriend prefers his steak as rare as possible), and the sauce was easy and delicious.

  • Crisp-skin salmon with honey-lime sauce

    • babyfork on March 02, 2016

      The wild Pacific salmon I used was very tasty, but the skin had been removed already by the fishmonger, so I didn't use the book's technique for crisp-skin. I just cooked it as I usually would in my cast iron skillet. My rating is really for the honey-lime sauce. Very good over the salmon...Dan especially liked it. Had run out of cayenne pepper, so used Aleppo pepper instead.

  • Crisp roast butterflied chicken with rosemary and garlic

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      There was nothing really wrong with this recipe. Butterflying isn't hard to do with a good pair of poultry shears, and flipping the chicken is made quick work with metal tongs. It's just that the pan drippings weren't used at all, and really couldn't be since they had all but burned off. If you're going to butterfly a chicken, use their recipe for high roast chicken over potatoes. It is a much better application of butterflied chicken.

  • Classic roast chicken with lemon-thyme pan sauce

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      This recipe is easy and delicious. The most challenging part is not burning your hands while placing the lemon cut side down in the hot skillet. The sauce isn't amazing, but it is good. I plan on trying this recipe with a brined bird to see what a difference it makes.

  • Sausage lasagna

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      My boyfriend absolutely loved this lasagna, said it was the best one I had ever made him, and I've done several of ATK's versions. It feels a little fussy, but making a lasagna always is. I appreciate the fact it's made in one pan, which is one of the issues with traditional lasagna: it dirties every pan! My only issue with this recipe is that the size of the skillet dictates the size of the dish, which means less leftovers than normal. C'est la vie.

  • Skillet macaroni and cheese

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      This is the best and easiest mac and cheese recipe I have ever tried. It's delicious, only takes about 15 minutes, and there's no hard to find ingredients or crazy sauce to make. Better, it's only one dish.

  • Skillet macaroni and cheese with ham and peas

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      I've done this recipe with peas, and I love it. The peas give it a nice textural contrast among the gooey cheesiness. Great recipe.

  • Cast-iron skillet calzone

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      VERY disappointing. Tasted fine, but not worth the effort.

    • Shewi128 on January 10, 2020

      This is a huge calzone that feeds my family of 4 for 2-3 meals. We love it, and it may be highly dependent on what you put in the calzone.

    • taste24 on June 11, 2020

      This was very delicious the first night, fresh out of the oven, but lacked a little leftover (it was dry). Not too difficult with the store bought pizza dough. I used extra pepperoni and omitted the sausage.

  • Cinnamon buns

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      Dangerously easy. Super tasty, couldn't tell the difference between these and the ones that took a day and a half.

  • Southern-style cornbread

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      Tasted dry and muted. Definitely will test again, but not a good prognosis so far.

  • Brown soda bread

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      Tasty and easy. Would be perfect to service on the side with a hearty stew. Does go stale quickly, which isn't surprising given the lack of preservatives.

  • Cinnamon swirl bread

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      It is not even fair how gorgeous and amazingly tasty this bread comes out for the effort put in. I don't even have a stand mixer, meaning I had to knead it by hand, and it was still by far worth the effort. It is delicious, interesting and engaging to make, and is SUCH a centerpiece. I've taken this bread to parties several times now, and people are always so impressed. Must must make.

  • Blueberry pie

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      So, I really wanted to make a pie, but did not want to make pie crust because I don't have any devices to make it easier (food processor, stand mixer, etc). And so I made this recipe using storebought pie crust. One word: don't. The filling is amazing, and I could eat it all day. It was actually pretty hilarious to taste this well rounded, juicy yet thick blueberry filling and then taste the chemical filled, barely flaky, stick to the roof of your mouth crust next. Seriously, this recipe is awesome. Everything you'd want in a blueberry pie. Just make sure to use homemade pie dough.

  • Pour-over peach cake

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      I tested this recipe with fresh peaches. The cake itself was delicious and well seasoned. However, when it came to release the cake from the skillet, it became a mess. I acknowledge my own responsibility in this, because I definitely struggled holding the still hot skillet with the wire rack against it. Maybe next time I make it, it won't fight me coming out. Even though I couldn't bring it to serve at a party like I had intended to, the broken bits were absolutely delicious.

  • Chocolate chip skillet cookie

    • mamacrumbcake on February 23, 2018

      This was ok. It was a bit dry. I was hoping for a gooier cookie.

    • Foodiewife on March 13, 2016

      How can anyone improve a classic chocolate chip cookie recipe? By baking it in a cast iron skillet! While still warm, these cookies are a deadly addiction. They are buttery, with a crispy bottom. They are also really easy to make. Serving it with a scoop of vanilla ice cream sounds good, but I think it would be too rich. One small wedge (I cut them into 16 pieces) was very rich.

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      I have made this recipe at least 20 times since getting this book. It is the deliciousness of their chocolate chip cookies, but made easier. This monster sized cookie tastes exactly as you want a chocolate chip cookie to taste. The slices keep really well in a tupperware too, not that you'll often have leftovers with this recipe.

  • Hot fudge pudding cake

    • clawsgirl on November 25, 2016

      Really simple, really easy to whip together. Makes an awesome hot shareable dessert. Only issue is that it dirties several bowls at a time.

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  • ISBN 10 1940352487
  • ISBN 13 9781940352480
  • Published Feb 02 2016
  • Format Paperback
  • Page Count 304
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher America's Test Kitchen

Publishers Text

The cast-iron skillet is a sturdy, versatile, traditional kitchen workhorse that 85% of us own but far fewer of us reach for daily, mostly because we have one or two recipes we use it for and otherwise it stays in the back of the cabinet. In this new cookbook, the editors of Cook's Country will show you everything you need to know about cast-iron cookware and the many (and often surprising) dishes you can cook and bake in this multitasker of a pan, from the classic dishes everyone knows and loves like steak, perfect fried eggs, and cornbread, to innovative and inspiring recipes like skillet apple pie, pizza, and cinnamon swirl bread. Learn about this cast iron's history and what makes it uniquely American and let us show you how to shop for, season, care for, and clean this perfect pan.

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