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The Homesick Texan Cookbook by Lisa Fain

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Notes about this book

  • dfwfoodiegeek on December 25, 2012

    West Texas Asado - This recipe is fairly involved due to making the chile sauce, but due to the long cooking time, the meat really developed amazing flavor and we scarfed it with fresh flour tortilla. I will definitely make again.

  • Breadcrumbs on June 12, 2012

    This book was chosen as a Cookbook of the Month on Chowhound and I was excited about the prospect of cooking from it. When I first received this book, I flagged almost every recipe. Everything looked delicious to me!! Unfortunately, after preparing 13 recipes, there simply weren’t enough hits from this book for me to continue cooking from it. I found that because there are some quirks with the recipes (inconsistencies or errors in directions, relentless use of cumin), I lost faith in the author’s recipes. Full summary of my experience here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/851923#7396948 and individual reviews all posted here in EYB.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Blanche's mustard pickles

    • paliczgy on September 08, 2017

      This pickle was inedible. Lot of pepper, lot of vinegar.

  • Jalapeño, cauliflower, and carrot pickles (Escabeche)

    • DKennedy on March 18, 2012

      Page 21 - Easy to make. I cut the recipe substantially and used mainly carrots and cauliflower, with only 1 pickled jalapeño added to the brine. Great served alongside any Mexican themed meal.

  • Jalapeño buttermilk dressing

    • Breadcrumbs on June 03, 2012

      p. 49 An interesting and unique (to me) dressing. Fresh with very green flavours. We love buttermilk dressings, ranch in particular so this dressing held immediate appeal. It’s also called for in a coleslaw recipe from the book so there was further incentive to make this multi-tasking sauce. When I tasted the dressing prior to seasoning, I felt it was a little grassy-tasting and flat. I do recognize cilantro would produce different results however I’m unable to use it due to an allergy. To boost the flavours, I added approx a tbsp of lime juice. This did brighten the dressing and brought out the tartness of the buttermilk. We liked this and felt it was better; good even, on the coleslaw (review to follow) however, I think we’d have preferred buttermilk to be the star of this dressing where in fact, there is only 1/4c of buttermilk to the 1/2c each of mayo and sour cream. Photos here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/851919#7379878

    • Laura on June 12, 2012

      Pg. 49. Made this as a dressing for the Cabbage and Radish Slaw recipe in this book. I made this as written with the exception that I used creme fraiche rather than sour cream and low-fat buttermilk. I liked the taste of it on its own, it had a bit of a spicy bite -- that was less noticeable on the slaw. If I were to make it again, I think I'd eliminate the mayonnaise and just up the portion of buttermilk and sour cream. I could see using this as a dip with crudites or as a dressing for steamed or grilled vegetables.

    • texannewyorker on September 19, 2016

      I love this, it's a go-to salad dressing if people don't mind the spiciness.

    • babyfork on September 10, 2014

      I made this to accompany the fried green tomatoes recipe in this book. I only used one medium-sized jalapeno instead of the two called for in the recipe since I didn't want it to be overly spicy. For the taste I was looking for, one worked perfectly. I did liberally salt and pepper and also added some lime juice to brighten the flavor a bit. This was great with the fried green tomatoes. I made tacos the following night and used some of the leftovers as a drizzle on my taco and enjoyed that too. I'll have to try this for the coleslaw other reviewers mentioned. I think it would make a great dip for crudité as well.

  • Guacamole

    • Breadcrumbs on June 03, 2012

      p. 50 Terrific! I made this with reservation since we have our own favourite recipe for guacamole. Though I omitted the cilantro due to an allergy, which would otherwise be a predominant flavour, we still felt this recipe produced a lovely, fresh-tasting guacamole that allowed the richness of the avocado to shine with the Serrano and lime juice providing fresh, bright contrasting flavours. The only other change I made was to incorporate approx 1 tbsp of diced red onion to compensate for the lack of another dominating flavour. We really enjoyed this and I’d definitely make it again. The Serrano was wonderful and held greater appeal than the jalapeno that I usually add. To preserve the bright green colour of your guacamole, store with the pits of the avocado atop your dip. Not sure why this works but it definitely seems to do so. I learned this from a colleague from Mexico. Photos here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/851919#7379894

  • Watermelon salsa

    • amraub on June 03, 2012

      A very refreshing salsa. The radish, watermelon, and serrano combination worked very well together. I omitted the cumin as it seemed odd to put in salsa.

  • Salsa fuego

    • amraub on April 22, 2012

      Served to guests with a wide-range of heat tolerances at a party and even the more spice-averse greatly enjoyed this salsa with chips.

    • DKennedy on March 18, 2012

      Page 56 - Served this smoky salsa over soft tacos filled with carnitas. Used only 1/2 t. of adobo sauce, no actual chipolte and this added enough heat for my family's taste.

  • Houston-style green salsa

    • amraub on July 14, 2012

      I have a personal preference for the version she posts on her web site (Ninfa's green sauce), but this salsa is also very good, just not quite as creamy. My guests loved it and it was a quick and easy solution for a last minute party.

    • Jane on June 11, 2012

      I decided to make this salsa to go with Carnitas (p.201) and it was the first time I had ever made either recipe and the first time I had cooked with tomatillos. I really liked the salsa - it was really easy to make, the flavor is very fresh, and it's very healthy. I had plenty of salsa left over after using it with the carnitas and flour tortillas. I have been eating it as a dip with baby carrots. I would happily eat it with lots of dishes.

  • Breakfast sausage

    • lhudson on July 16, 2015

      I had never tried to make Breakfast Sausage before, so this recipe opened up a whole new way of thinking about sausage patties, I have never really like them, but this easy recipe has changed my mind. I can't wait to try different spice combinations.

    • amraub on June 10, 2012

      Very quick and easy to make and uses ingredients that most people have on hand. Reminded me of the breakfast sausage I had growing up. Served with buttermilk biscuits to make breakfast sandwiches.

  • Black bean dip

    • ereibel on January 01, 2012

      Smooth and creamy bean dip.

  • Chipotle pimento cheese

    • texannewyorker on September 19, 2016

      The chipotle makes this very spicy, but it's delicious! A nice twist on the traditional.

    • lhudson on July 16, 2015

      I usually find Pimento Cheese a bit boring, so this recipe was a nice change. I would definitely make it again. It might be too spicy for those who do not like the heat.

  • Chorizo empanadas

    • amraub on April 22, 2012

      My guests and I loved these empanadas. I used the red chorizo recipe in the book and skipped on the sesame seeds. I sometimes have trouble rolling out pie crusts, but had no trouble with rolling out this dough. It's worth the extra work over using pre-made empanada dough. If you end up with extra filling, it mixes up very nicely with eggs for breakfast taco filling the next morning.

    • Breadcrumbs on June 12, 2012

      p. 95 We enjoyed these although I did find the filling to be drier than that in other empanadas I’ve made in the past. I do think its important to use a good quality, well-seasoned sausage since the flavour of the chorizo shines in this dish. I used 3/4lb of chorizo to fill my pastry shells and I still had some of the filling left over. The recipe suggests 2tsp of filling per empanada. This is simply inadequate. I referred to my other empanada recipes and 2tbsp was the typical amount required for a 5 in. pastry. Instead of rolling out and cutting the dough as LF suggests, I find it much easier to break off golf-ball sized pieces of refrigerated dough and roll into a 5 in. disk when I’m working with cream cheese pastry dough. No cutting required. I omitted the cumin. Good but not great for us. We liked the flavour and always enjoy the flaky crust produced by a cream cheese pastry but it the filling was a bit dry for us. Photos here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/851920#7396832

  • Queso cookies

    • amraub on April 22, 2012

      Quick, easy, and they taste like a bowl of queso in cracker form. Even better, you don't have to worry about keeping the queso warm when you put these out for guests.

  • Chile con queso

    • texannewyorker on September 19, 2016

      Adding the sour cream at the end is a genius step. Makes a smooth, creamy queso without needing any Velveeta :)

  • Fried green tomatoes

    • babyfork on September 10, 2014

      A good recipe that turns out tasty fried green tomatoes. I found that I did not need to use the full half-inch of oil called for and they still fried up nicely. (I used bacon fat instead of oil, btw). I used less than a 1/4 inch in a 12-inch cast-iron skillet and was able to get two batches out of that. Definitely make the Jalapeno Buttermilk Dressing to serve with these...it completes the recipe.

  • Chorizo-stuffed jalapeños

    • amraub on April 22, 2012

      The filling with these is perfect (the leftovers work great the next morning with mixed with eggs for breakfast tacos). The taste isn't nearly as good once they have cooled, so they're not ideal for leaving sitting out at a party as an appetizer. I think the filling would also work well in more mild peppers if you or your guests can't handle jalapenos.

  • Jalapeño pinto beans

    • DKennedy on March 18, 2012

      Page 122 - Good, solid recipe. I substituted a serrano for the jalapeño and I didn't cut it up.

    • Breadcrumbs on June 03, 2012

      p. 122 Tasty. Simple enough to prepare, just allow yourself some time as the cooking duration is 4 to 6 hours. I love multi-taking dishes and since JF calls for these beans in her refried bean recipe I thought I’d make them today as a side and re-purpose them later in the week. I love beans with vinegar or some acid and spritzed each bowl w some lime juice prior to serving. This recipe produced a tasty bean dish. I’d be interested to hear from our Texan friends whether the flavours of this dish and the cooking method for preparing the beans are traditional. Photos here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/851920#7379901

  • Frijoles a la charra

    • Breadcrumbs on June 12, 2012

      p. 123 These beans were just ok for us. They were very hot and I only used 1 chipotle in adobo vs the 2 LF calls for. They also seemed to lack something in terms of flavour and tasted a bit flat. LF suggests you puree the tomato-bacon mixture for this dish but notes that if you prefer a chunkier texture, you can skip that step. Somehow I couldn’t wrap my mind around pureed bacon. I skipped that step! If someone else makes these, I’d be interested to hear if the flavours are authentic. This was a miss for us.

  • Austin-style black beans

    • Laura on June 11, 2012

      Pg. 124. I made this recipe because another recipe in the book (Green Chile Posole with Black Beans) called for 2 cups of these beans. There were still plenty left over and we're enjoying them on their own. Together with the broth, this dish is more like a bean soup, which is fine with me. It is spicy, but not overly so. Lovers of heat might want to kick up the spices a bit.

  • Smoky tortilla soup

    • Laura on August 16, 2012

      Pg. 127. I can only echo what Breadcrumbs said in her note. This is a labor- and cookware-intensive dish and yet worth every minute and dirty dish. I have to confess that I did not include the tortillas due to time considerations and still we loved this. I also did not add the smoked paprika because the soup seemed perfectly smoky already. I did add the shredded chicken and all of the other accoutrements. So glad that we have leftovers for tomorrow!

    • Breadcrumbs on June 04, 2012

      p. 127 Delicious but don’t make this on a weeknight, this is a time-consuming dish with lots of dirty dishes left in its wake! We (and I in particular) loved this soup. JF has you add some smoked paprika however I skipped this step, as the mixture was smoky enough for our tastes at this point. Prior to plating, tortillas are placed in the bottoms of your serving bowls along w some grated Monterey Jack cheese and some shredded chicken if you wish. This is one of my new favourite soups; it really is wonderful. I spritzed bowls w lime juice prior to serving to boost the sour flavours. The warmth of the chilies, the subtle smokiness, the contrasting textures of the crunchy/chewy tortilla strips and the gooey cheese. Pure heaven in a bowl! This was everything I hoped it would be and more. Top marks from everyone at the table tonight. Photos here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/851920#7381972

    • DKennedy on April 20, 2013

      Made this based on BC's recommendation and so glad I did. Thanks BC. I disagree that it is not for weeknights. Most of my weeknight meals are at least this labor intensive, and this one had the added bonus of being a one pot meal with leftover for the next day! Note that can use rotisserie chicken and TJs cantina style corn chips to save time. I agree that the recommended amount of smoke paprika was too much. I used 1/2 teaspoon and that was perfect. I also modified the amount of chipoltes used (1 T.of the sauce from the can, no pepper) to make it more kid friendly. Other modifications: adding a dollop of sour cream, fresh corn off the cob, rinsed canned black beans, and diced fresh tomatoes - all added to the bottom of each serving bowl, along with the pepper jack cheese, avocado and chicken - makes for a hearty bowl of soup! Rated "make again" by my family. Freezes beautifully.

    • chawkins on January 22, 2013

      Wow, what a wonderful soup, real depth of flavor, so much better than any other tortilla soup I've ever made. I used all the spices called for. Instead of the pasilla chiles, I used ancho chiles, made from home-grown poblanos, which were suggested as good substitutes. For the tomatoes, I just used a can of organic diced tomato, not fire-roasted.

    • jayg312 on April 25, 2012

      Made 4/22/2012. Excellent recipe, just the right amount of heat. I added the shredded chicken and liked it. Also added a dollop of sour cream in a couple servings and that worked well. Will definitely make again.

  • Corn chowder with roasted jalapeños and bacon

    • lhudson on August 12, 2015

      Had some corn from the farmers market that I need to use in a hurry and thought this was the perfect recipe to try. The chowder was a bit to spicy for me, so next time I would cut back on the cayenne but my husband loved it.

    • lkgrover on July 29, 2017

      Excellent soup, but very spicy! I used 1/8 tsp each cumin & nutmeg, a smidgen of cayenne, and 3/4 of a jalapeno chile, and I still thought it was hot.

  • Green chile chowder

    • DKennedy on March 18, 2012

      Page 132 - Wonderful soup. Omitted the jalapeños and substituted a bag of TJs frozen roasted peppers for 3 of the 4 poblanos. Roasted the remaining poblano and added it to the mix. The resulting soup was flavorful and very kid friendly. Since it wasn't spicy, it did not need the cream or the milk so I left this out. Served with pepper jack cheese. Next time will add more poblanos in addition to the frozen roasted peppers.

  • Squash and pork stew (Calabacitas)

    • DKennedy on March 18, 2012

      Page 135 - Effortless one pot dish that would make a great weeknight dinner. It does not hold well, as the longer the corn, zucchini and squash are in the sauce, the more muddled the results. Tip: Make ahead to the point of adding the corn and squash, then add to the dish 10 minutes before serving.

  • Sopa de fideo

    • PennyG on April 07, 2014

      Excellent, Excellent, Excellent! As you can tell, I loved this. This will be a go-to recipe from this point forward for me. My only addition was Queso Fresco, along with the lime and cilantro, when serving.

  • Seven-chile Texas chili

    • wcassity on December 25, 2013

      Great, complex flavor. Big hit at office chili cook off.

    • Maura on August 16, 2014

      Won a chili contest with this recipe, I added 2 cups beef stock when I started the 5 hour cooking process. It was outstanding.

    • DKennedy on December 31, 2014

      This is a good, solid chili recipe, though it will not make to "go to" status for me. I cut down the peppers by a lot and it was still pretty hot. I used 1 of each pepper that called for two, 1/2 of each pepper that called for 4, and 2 of each pepper that called for 6. I left out the cayenne and chipotle all together. I liked the technique of soaking the peppers and then discarding the liquid. I usually add that liquid to my chili. I think if I had done that here this chili would have been unbearably hot. Also removed most of the seeds, replaced the water with chicken stock, and added a splash of fortified red wine. Cooked up on the stove top for 4 hours, refrigerated overnight and then cooked again for 2 hours. The heat mellowed considerably overnight.

  • One-hour Texas chili

    • TrishaCP on February 06, 2012

      This was pretty tasty- however I needed to make a few tweaks. I used 3-4 T of masa harina- my chili was way too watery otherwise. I also added a can of kidney beans towards the end. I know that LF wants people to appreciate the integrity of the chili and beans separately, but I don' t think this chili stands alone as a complete meal without the beans- without them, it is more of a topping chili (for Frito Pie, per the original recipe on her website, for chili dogs, etc.) than a main course.

  • Carne guisada

    • sheepishjen on June 10, 2017

      Great way to cook cheaper cuts of beef and it is refreshing to have a beef stew that is not your usual carrots, onions and red wine deal. I halved the recipe and it worked beautifully

  • Green chile posole with black beans

    • Laura on June 12, 2012

      Pg. 146. Often when I receive a new cookbook I like to randomly turn to a page and, assuming the recipe is appealing, make whatever recipe is on that page. That's how I came to make this posole. The picture was gorgeous and with the list of ingredients, it seemed like it couldn't miss. It was a lot of work, what with having to make the Austin-style black beans as an ingredient in the posole. And quite frankly, the results were disappointing. It just did not wow us at all. The flavors did not work for us and it was a bit tart. Admittedly, I have never used hominy before and perhaps I'm just not a fan, although I've had posoles in restaurants and loved them. Anyway, I don't think I'd make this again.

  • Pasilla tomatillo braised short ribs

    • Breadcrumbs on June 03, 2012

      p. 195 – I used canned tomatillos and I also used bone-in short ribs because that’s what the butcher sells and, the bone is really what this cut is all about, isn’t it?! Our beer of choice was an Innis & Gunn Canadian Cask – a full-bodied, oak aged ale. Since LF indicates you may use beer, beef broth or water I opted to use one bottle of the I&G and some homemade beef broth. This dish was aromatic and enticing as it simmered away atop the stovetop. Since my liquids did not cover the meat, I opted not to completely uncover the pot for the final 90 min simmer. I shredded the meat in some of the stock and made tacos topped w Monterey Jack cheese and some of the coleslaw from this book Were these the best short ribs we’ve ever had? No. Were they tasty? Yes. I particularly liked the tang that the tomatillos brought to the mix, a very nice contrast to counter the richness of the meat. The spritz of lime stirred in at the final stage of cooking further enhanced these flavours.

    • amraub on May 28, 2012

      Made with bone-in short ribs and canned tomatillos (400ml can for 1/2 of the recipe). Beef turned out delicious and very tender. The cooking aroma made it hard to do the full 3 hour simmer, but it was well worth it. Served with Houston-style tortillas.

  • Dr Pepper ribs

    • amraub on June 20, 2012

      I cut down a bit on the amount of rub used and cooked these ribs in the slow cooker with the glaze on the entire time. The sauce was good and the ribs were tender and flavourful. One of my friends asked for the recipe immediately after they were served.

    • Breadcrumbs on June 12, 2012

      p. 199 Disappointing. This recipe was far too hot for us. The heat was so overpowering that we simply didn’t want to continue eating the ribs. We definitely enjoy hot, spicy food but something about this just didn’t work for us. I’d note: LF’s rub calls for 1/4 cup pepper. Not sure if this contributed to the over-bearing heat of our dish but I’d cut this quantity in half if I made these again. Other recipes for this dish call for the ribs to be placed fleshy side down in the baking dish, which would allow for the meat to become infused with the Dr Pepper flavour while cooking. LF has you put the ribs meat side up. For the final 30 mins of cooking we chose to finish these on the grill. These looked and smelled sensational so it was a huge disappointment to find the heat to be overpowering. The meat was tender and juicy. I would definitely make Dr Pepper ribs again, just not with this recipe. Photos here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/851921#7396810

    • ellencooks on August 21, 2017

      We all really liked these! I have a favorite dry rub I use on ribs but am glad I tried this. I usually grill my ribs for a long time over indirect low heat but these came out very good. The sauce was sweet and spicy. There was a lot of pepper, as noted by Breadcrumbs.

  • Carnitas

    • Jane on June 11, 2012

      It was so easy to do though it takes a long time to cook. I was using half quantity of meat but kept the liquids in the same quantity as the recipe since I couldn't see a pan with no lid could keep that amount of liquid for 2.75 hours. I was glad I did as I cooked it for less time (I made my cubes smaller than 2 inches) and the liquid was all gone. The result was very tasty though I think I should have left more fat on the meat for the final stage of crisping. I served it with flour tortillas and and Houston-style green salsa (p.59)

    • DKennedy on March 18, 2012

      Page 201 - Simple but delicious recipe. Served with Jalapeño pinto beans, and Salsa Fuego.

  • Fancy-pants King Ranch chicken casserole

    • Jane on June 18, 2012

      This isn't the kind of dish I would usually make so perhaps it's not surprising that I was disappointed. It wasn't that it was bad, it just wasn't worth the effort. A freshly made creamy tomato and pepper sauce is layered with shredded chicken, cheese and tortillas then baked. It was like a Tex-Mex lasagna. As I said, not bad, but I don't plan to make it again.

  • Jalapeño mustard roast chicken

    • amraub on May 17, 2012

      Excellent roast chicken. The mustard is prominent, but overwhelming and the jalapeno adds just a hint of heat. The skin came out nice and crispy while the meat was juicy and flavourful. I marinated overnight rather than just 8 hours.

  • Mexican red chorizo

    • amraub on April 22, 2012

      I made this to go in the book's empanadas and chorizo-filled jalapenos. It comes together quickly and easily once the chiles were rehydrated. Next time, I'll make a larger batch so I can freeze some of it to have on hand for later. I used Mexican oregano and hickory smoked paprika. It's so nice to have a good recipe to make chorizo rather than trying to find Mexican chorizo here. It's also nice not to worry about having to remove the chorizo from the casing for many recipes!

  • Crawfish rolls

    • Bloominanglophile on September 14, 2013

      I think this recipe is good--unfortunately my crawfish tails weren't the best. Good for a quick meal--must try this again!

  • Guajillo-chile fish tacos with cabbage slaw

    • lkgrover on November 08, 2016

      I used 1 teaspoon ground guajillo chiles (from Savory Spice Shop). Decreased the cayenne pepper to a "pinch" (maybe 1/16 teaspoon). Also substituted packaged coleslaw mix (containing white cabbage and a few carrots), because I am too lazy to chop red cabbage. I like the flavor of the modified tacos: spicy, but not too hot. It is refreshing to have fish tacos that are not breaded and fried.

  • Redfish on the half shell

    • lhkelsey on August 08, 2015

      This is now my favorite way to cook redfish! Really nice flavor and very easy.

  • Cabbage and radish slaw

    • Breadcrumbs on June 03, 2012

      Cabbage and Radish Slaw – p. 255 I love the idea of having slaw in a taco so I made this dish with the idea of serving the slaw along w the shredded Pasilla Tomatillo short ribs (p. 195). To make this recipe, you’ll need to prepare the Jalapeno Buttermilk Dressing p. 49. FYI, I cheated and used a bag of pre-shredded cabbage. If you’re shredding your own, JF suggests you toss w some salt and let sit for an hour prior to draining and carrying on as set out above. This was good, not great. It was nice atop other ingredients in a taco but I don’t think I’d be yearning to eat a bowl on its own. When we re-serve, I’ll toss in some lime juice and see if that brings the slaw to life. I’d definitely omit the cumin seeds as I found them to be out of place and even odd tasting relative to the remaining ingredients. When I do use cumin seeds, I tend to toast them in a dry pan to bring out the oils and flavour. Photos here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/851922#7379886

    • Laura on June 12, 2012

      Pg. 255. We liked this, but didn't love it. I served it over a bed of watercress. It was a nice, light, refreshing dish, but the flavors were not as vibrant as I would have liked. I did not use the cumin seeds, otherwise followed the recipe as written. For the buttermilk dressing I used creme fraiche in place of the sour cream because I had it on hand. The slaw was a bit watery, so I think you could easily cut back on the amount of dressing.

  • Cucumber salad

    • Breadcrumbs on June 12, 2012

      p. 258 - This salad turned out to be ok but I wouldn’t make it again. Cucumbers are sliced then salted and allow to sit, refrigerated for at least an hour. This was my first issue w the recipe as the step seems unnecessary and the drained, rinsed cucumbers had lost their fresh crispness as their water was displaced. If you look at the photo in the book, the cucumbers appear to be freshly sliced vs prepared in the manner LF suggests. I went w the yogurt version of the dressing, which was extremely thick - too thick in my view and I ended up thinning it out w water the following day. I also used fresh dill in place of cilantro due to an allergy. Again, if you look at the photo in the book, the dish seems to contain fresh dill and no cilantro is visible. I think we’d have liked the dressing if I’d gone w the sour cream version but it was the texture of the cucumbers that blew this for us. They were limp, similar to the texture of a sliced pickle.

  • Texas caviar

    • Breadcrumbs on June 04, 2012

      p. 261 I make a black bean salad that has very similar ingredients and flavours as this dish. I liked this recipe as LF gives you the option of using canned beans. Since I planned to make 8 recipes from this book today, any short cuts were welcome! This recipe produces a fresh and flavourful side dish or dip – you decide how you wish to serve it. We enjoyed this one. Prep is simple if you’re using the canned beans. Beans are drained and rinsed then tossed w green onions (why omit the white part?!! Sorry, I just can’t do it!), cilantro (parsley due to allergy), jalpenos, tomatoes (of which I doubled the quantity as I wanted to serve this as a salsa), yellow pepper and garlic. A dressing of lime juice, olive oil, cumin, S&P is whisked together before incorporating. I added some lime zest to the mix as well. Fresh and flavourful. We both agreed we prefer my black bean salad though. Photos here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/851922#7379916

  • Cactus salad

    • sheepishjen on June 10, 2017

      My first time using fresh cactus paddles that I found at the farmers market. This is a tasty and simple recipe.

  • Poblano macaroni and cheese

    • sheepishjen on June 10, 2017

      This is a mac and cheese recipe to die for. It has such amazing flavors and is for once different from the usual variations that simply call for different types of cheese or breadcrumbs. With cumin, lime and the chiles, this absolutely pops with flavor!

  • Tex-Mex squash casserole

    • wcassity on August 13, 2012

      Tasty, homey summer casserole. I used 1/2 jalapeno versus two on account of my young children, and it was consequently missing some needed kick.

    • ellencooks on August 21, 2017

      I really liked this casserole. I halved the recipe and added a bit more squash so it would fill a 9x9 pan. Definitely a dish to repeat!

  • Tomato cobbler

    • amraub on June 06, 2012

      This recipe had so much potential, but it just didn't work for us. The two biggest problems are the recipe calls for entirely too much butter and the bottom layer needs salt. I had high expectations for this recipe, but the execution just didn't live up to them. If the bottom layer is supposed to be more cornbread-like, then it should have bacon grease instead of butter and buttermilk instead of milk. The dish might also benefit from some cheese. I enjoyed the leftovers more than the initial taste because I had lower expectations and I think with a lot of tweaks this could become a good dish, but as is, it was a bit disappointing.

  • Red chile rice

    • Breadcrumbs on June 03, 2012

      p. 276 - Very nice rice. I love smoky flavours so this dish held much greater appeal for me than it did for mr bc. For the same reason, I preferred it over similar, Spanish-style rice dishes I’ve had in the past. I made 8 recipes from this book today and this was my favourite. I have to say, the cumin definitely seemed out of place in this dish and I omitted it. I find the author’s recipes in-precise and the tomatoes here are an example of what I’m talking about. LF indicates a 1/2c yield after combining 3/4 drained chopped tomatoes, 1/4 medium onion, 2 cloves garlic and a tbsp of lime juice. Even if you pressed your tomatoes, you’d definitely have more than a 1/2 cup yield. Prior to serving, I popped the rice under the broiler and melted some Monterey Jack cheese atop. Yum!

    • lkgrover on November 08, 2016

      I used a whole can of diced tomatoes; all other ingredients as in the recipe. I blended it in a mini-chopper; got 2 cups yield for the tomato paste. (Used about 1 1/2 cups in my rice: very spicy!) I have been melting cheese on top of the rice to make it less spicy. (Cojita cheese because I used it in the tacos that was my main dish.)

  • Ruby red sweet rolls

    • wcassity on January 07, 2013

      These came out perfectly. Lovely sweet flavor with hint of citrus. Very tender rolls. I'm not a seasoned baker but I followed the recipe and had no issues. Had to let the dough rise for about twice the time suggested, and had to cook them for a bit longer than 15 minutes in order to get golden brown tops.

  • Houston-style flour tortillas

    • amraub on May 28, 2012

      Finally, I've found the tortillas that I miss and crave! The dough comes together very easily and rolls out nicely. I found I needed to turn the heat on my cast-iron skillet to medium or else they burned too quickly. The flavour on these is much richer than tortillas made with milk and vegetable oil.

  • Lemon lavender bread

    • Breadcrumbs on March 08, 2012

      I imagine this would be lovely w anise instead of lavender.

  • Chocoflan

    • annmartina on July 08, 2017

      I baked in a bundt pan and it took over two hours to bake

  • Coconut tres leches cake

    • annmartina on July 08, 2017

      I think there might be an error in this recipe. The cake comes out heavy and dense and flat. Other people online have had the same outcome. Possible the eggs need to be separated and the whites whipped and folded in?

  • Date bars

    • DKennedy on February 04, 2017

      These are in the oven right now. I made them from my Super Bowl Sunday spread. I substituted a mixture of GF flour (1 c. less 1 T.) then added 1 T. bean flour in place of the 1 c. regular flour called for in the recipe. These are a snap to put together and pretty tasty right out of the bowl. Anxious to see how they taste once they are cooked.

  • Mexican coffee ice cream with ancho chile hot fudge

    • sck on March 29, 2014

      Too creamy for my taste. We threw some of it out. And that doesn't usually happen with i e cream in my house!

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Reviews about this book

  • Simply Recipes

    Paging through the cookbook, practically every recipe is one that jumps out at me to make. Oh, I wanna make that. Oh this one too. Oh, that one looks good. Chicken-fried steak. Biscuits and gravy....

    Full review
  • Smitten Kitchen

    The book, by the way, is fantastic. The day I got it, I stopped what I was doing...and read the whole book, cover to cover and was overwhelmed with a desire to book a flight to Texas.

    Full review
  • Creative Kitchen

    Congratulations on such a beautiful cookbook!! It’s definitely one I recommend for your cookbook collection.

    Full review

Reviews about Recipes in this Book

  • ISBN 10 1401324266
  • ISBN 13 9781401324261
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Sep 13 2011
  • Format Hardcover
  • Page Count 304
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Hyperion Books
  • Imprint Hyperion Books

Publishers Text

When Lisa Fain, a seventh-generation Texan, moved to New York City, she missed the big sky, the bluebonnets in spring, Friday night football, and her family's farm. But most of all, she missed the foods she'd grown up with.

After a fruitless search for tastes of Texas in New York City, Fain took matters into her own hands. She headed into the kitchen to cook for her friends the Tex-Mex, the chili, and the country comfort dishes that reminded her of home. From cheese enchiladas drowning in chili gravy to chicken-fried steak served with cream gravy on the side, from warm bowls of chile con queso to big pots of fiery chili made without beans, Fain re-created the wonderful tastes of Texas she'd always enjoyed at potlucks, church suppers, and backyard barbecues back home.

In 2006, Fain started the blog Homesick Texan to share Texan food with fellow expatriates, and the site immediately connected with readers worldwide, Texan and non-Texan alike. Now, in her long-awaited first cookbook, Fain brings the comfort of Texan home cooking to you.

Like Texas itself, the recipes in this book are varied and diverse, all filled with Fain's signature twists. There's Salpicón, a cool shredded beef salad found along the sunny border in El Paso; Soft Cheese Tacos, a creamy plate unique to Dallas; and Houston-Style Green Salsa, an avocado and tomatillo salsa that is smooth, refreshing, and bright. There are also nibbles, such as Chipotle Pimento Cheese and Tomatillo Jalapeño Jam; sweet endings, such as Coconut Tres Leches Cake and Mexican Chocolate Chewies; and fresh takes on Texan classics, such as Coffee-Chipotle Oven Brisket, Ancho Cream Corn, and Guajillo-Chile Fish Tacos.

With more than 125 recipes, The Homesick Texan offers a true taste of the Lone Star State. So pull up a chair--everyone's welcome at the Texas table!



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