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Food52 Genius Recipes: 100 Recipes That Will Change the Way You Cook by Kristen Miglore

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Notes about this book

  • DKennedy on August 03, 2015

    A Homemade Life recommends the following recipes: Roasted Applesauce, p. 12; Raised Waffles, p. 29, Moro's Warm Squash and Chickpea Salad, p. 70, Diana Kennedy's dead simple carnitas, p. 120 and Marie Helene's Apple Cake, p. 221. Have it out from the library right now and it will be added to my shelf pretty soon. I have already made 5 things from it, and have only had it on loan for 3 days. Great for weeknight fare or for a kid going off to college. Hard to justify the shelf space since many of the recipes are duplicates of recipes I own in their original books.

Notes about Recipes in this book

  • Chicken thighs with lemon [Melissa Hamilton and Christopher Hirsheimer]

    • tmatthey on October 28, 2015

      Crispy skin delivered! The technique is simplicity itself.

    • DKennedy on October 27, 2015

      A complete and utter success. Used the chantal dutch oven and used the same technique to first make thighs, then moved on to wings and legs, emptying pot of grease in between batches.

    • Astrid5555 on April 13, 2015

      Delicious chicken thighs with the crispiest skin I have made so far. The only issue I had is that it took much closer to 1 hour for the meat to be cooked through than the 45 minutes stated in the recipe.

    • stockholm28 on February 28, 2016

      This technique produces a wonderful, crispy chicken skin and a very moist chicken thigh. I used a cast iron pan which worked perfectly. I will definitely use this technique again.

    • Zosia on December 08, 2015

      I agree with the other reviewers: the method worked perfectly in delivering crisp skin and tender meat.

  • Broccoli cooked forever [Roy Finamore]

    • tmatthey on October 09, 2015

      UGLY. Oily. Yet I liked - or loved - it every time we ate it (or the leftovers thereof). Best use was with a baked potato (second use). Worst use was as a veggie side on its own some (first use). It still was yum but the recipe which I tried to follow anally (because that is who I am) was too oily for a stand alone, for me. I will def make again, with the intent of using pasta/potato/bread to sop up the oil the first serving and then use the remainders as the side dish. The marriage of flavors - brocc, oil, garlic, anchovies, etc ... that part really rocks.

    • Melanie on April 27, 2015

      The title of this one caught my eye - the broccoli is blanched before being cooked for two hours in olive oil flavoured with chillies, garlic and anchovies. I served this on pasta for dinner and don't think that I would have enjoyed it if simply served with bread but the flavour was really lovely. I thought that there was too much oil left in the pan at the end of cooking so will consider reducing the quantity next time.

    • Frogcake on April 01, 2016

      This is an incredibly delicious way to use broccoli. Yumm. I've stirred this into pasta like pesto and I've used this to flavour soups. Will make this again for sure.

  • Orange & almond cake [Claudia Roden]

    • Jane on June 09, 2017

      I love this recipe and make it a lot. Anyone who has it asks for the recipe. It is very moist and is really a pudding cake so if you like your cakes dry this isn't one for you. I'll carry on using Claudia's original recipe though - a bit more sugar and almonds, cover the oranges when boiling rather than in "a little water" and for 90 minutes rather than 2 hours, and bake at 375 rather than 400.

    • Melanie on August 16, 2015

      This cake is perfect. Not too rich but full of flavour. Microwave the oranges instead of boiling for two hours.

    • macfadden on March 17, 2017

      I am clearly in the minority here--this recipe has many five star ratings on the NY Times' website--but I found this cake insipid and mushy. I will refrain from rating because I used almond meal rather than grinding my own almonds, and I suspect that may have been the cause of my texture troubles, but it doesn't explain why the recipe doesn't call for any salt when it so clearly needs it.

  • Whole roasted cauliflower with whipped goat cheese [Alon Shaya]

    • mirage on May 30, 2016

      I didn't think doing the cauliflower that way was worth it - next time I'll just roast it normally. But the goat cheese was fabulous!

  • Brisket of beef [Nach Waxman]

    • JoanN on January 24, 2016

      Certainly easy, but I thought the flavor pretty insipid. Not worth repeating.

  • Tomato sauce with butter & onion [Marcella Hazan]

    • Gio on December 08, 2015

      We've cooked this version of pasta sauce several times in the past, the first being not exactly a failure but not exactly something we were expecting though we ought to have. It does take a bit of getting used to though because it's contrary to sauces many of us have learned. However, it's surprising what a fresh tomatoey sauce the ratio creates. The first time we cooked rigatoni and that just didn't suit the sauce at all. Ravioli the second time, thanks to a discussion with Maureen B. Fant, made all the difference. It's been the ravioli ever since. Last night it was ricotta ravioli. I do not toss the ravioli. Just ladle the sauce over the ravioli when plating. I only use this sauce for ravioli

    • cespitler on August 27, 2017

      Great, quick sauce that shows off fresh tomatoes. 3lbs of romas out of the garden, which will be paired with fresh pasta tomorrow.

    • Astrid5555 on April 18, 2015

      I have been meaning to try this recipe for some time now, and with the book out I finally managed to do so. There have not been so many positive comments from the whole family for a simple dish like this one in ages. On top, if you use canned tomatoes as I did, there is actually no work involved. Just break up the canned tomatoes, add the butter and the onion and let it simmer for 45 minutes, done. This will be our new "OMG it's dinner time already and we completely forgot to go shopping" dish from now on.

    • Melanie on August 21, 2015

      Easy and delicious. Used canned tomatoes as in the middle of winter, this was great for a mid week meal.

    • jecca on March 18, 2016

      I use an immersion blender to blend in the softened onion at the end, and then add enough salt to balance the acidity of the tomatoes and the sweetness of the onions.

    • Lepa on July 22, 2016

      Brilliant, easy and one of the best sauces I make. We eat this constantly and enjoy it every time. I usually blend in one half of the onion and also put fresh basil on top.

    • Frogcake on May 16, 2016

      Yum. I've made this a dozen times now as it is my go-to recipe for using very ripe tomatoes off the vine. I also use it as a simple, fresh tasting soup served with home made bread.

  • Baked brown rice [Alton Brown]

    • Gio on December 02, 2015

      Pg. 59. Not quick but certainly easy and the outcome is a well-flavored side dish of nutty, slightly chewy brown rice. We used clarified butter instead of plain unsalted, but otherwise followed the recipe as written. Ordinarily I would have used chicken broth as the cooking liquid but here we used water. Ultimately a good side dish with a healthy tasty grain that's worth a redo.

    • stockholm28 on January 16, 2016

      Excellent technique. The rice was nutty and a bit chewy.

    • Zosia on December 10, 2015

      Too late I realized I didn't have enough medium grain rice to make this so used long grain brown rice instead. It still worked but the rice was done a bit sooner, after 50 minutes. I omitted the salt and used low-sodium chicken broth in place of water. I'll definitely use this method again.

  • Warm squash & chickpea salad with tahini [Moro]

    • ellabee on February 08, 2016

      Easy, delicious, nutritious. Will make again for sure. Makes enough dressing for two batches, and dressing keeps well in fridge for a week. Can substitute parsley for cilantro. Squash cooled completely while I wrestled with emulsifying the new jar of tahini. Make sure red onion pieces are small (soaked in vinegared ice water, they still were more biting than average). Second and third outings: subbed scallions for lack of red onion, otherwise as written. Addictive and vegan. [spiral notebook p. 74]

    • Lepa on July 22, 2016

      This is one of my favorite salads. I can easily eat the whole bowl, standing at the counter, before I even get to the table. Absolutely stunning and addictive.

  • Balsamic glazed beets & greens [Peter Berley]

    • lorloff on May 21, 2017

      These were delicious. We had beautiful beets and their greens from the organic farmers market and I was staying with a friend who did not like beets. These were fantastic and he loved them. I added two cloves of garlic and we used dried tarragon instead of the fresh because we did not have fresh. A great dish that I will make again also saves time because most of the cooking time is unattended and you do not have to peel the beets.

  • Watermelon, mint & cider vinegar tonic [Louisa Shafia]

    • DKennedy on October 27, 2015

      In the fridge infusing right now.

  • "Use a spoon" chopped salad [Michel Nischan]

    • DKennedy on October 27, 2015

      The pickled veggies needed for this recipe are in the fridge right now, pickling.

    • Livmichelle on June 30, 2017

      The salad was too vinegary for us and too heavy on the goat cheese. Love the chopped salad idea snd the pickled veggies.

  • Roasted carrot & avocado salad with crunchy seeds [ABC Kitchen]

    • DKennedy on October 27, 2015

      This is a very good salad for the effort required, though it is a bit one dimensional compared to the Jean George roasted carrot recipe. Still, would make again. It is very pretty on a plate, especially when using tricolored carrots.

  • Marie-Hélène's apple cake [Dorie Greenspan]

    • DKennedy on October 27, 2015

      A really wonderful, easy cake to prepare. See original recipe in AMFT for modifications.

    • Astrid5555 on May 02, 2015

      This cake has been a family favorite for years. Whenever we need a quick dessert this is our go to option. Nothing better and more comforting than this custardy apple cake!

  • Pumpkin pie [Meta Given]

    • TrishaCP on November 27, 2015

      This really did make a great pumpkin pie. I blind-baked a crust since I was using a glass pie plate-I was happy with that decision. Doing so, and because I heated the custard before adding to the pie, I only needed 20 minutes of baking-I then turned off the oven and let the pie remain in the oven for another 5 minutes. The texture was perfect with no cracks. The filling tasted like the best pumpkin pie- it was not overwhelmed by spices (though I did add a few scrapes of nutmeg, since I love it.) If you don't already have a tried and true recipe for pumpkin pie, give this a go.

    • twoyolks on October 31, 2016

      This might be the best pumpkin pie I've made. The filling has a lot of pumpkin flavor. The spices compliment the pumpkin without becoming the center piece of the pie. The texture of the filling is also lighter and airer than other pumpkin pies. It took mine about 15 minutes longer to bake than the recipe specified (I did not blind bake the crust). It might have been because the milk, eggs, and cream were cold when I mixed them with the pumpkin.

    • sosayi on November 23, 2017

      Loved this pumpkin pie. I did not blind bake and found that I also needed an extra 10-15 minutes in the oven for the custard to set. The top edge of my crust was perfectly browned, but I’d prefer the bottom to be more cooked. Next time I’d either bake on a heated pizza stone/steel or par-bake and then cover the crust edges once they were browned enough. I also added a few gratings of nutmeg and substituted lactose free half and half for the cream/milk. Worked great! Will make again for sure.

  • Chocolate muscovado banana cake [Nigel Slater]

    • Astrid5555 on March 04, 2017

      A little bit too grown-up tasting for the kids, maybe because of the 70% chocolate I used, but the adults enjoyed it very much. Reduced the sugar to 200g, still sweet enough. As Zosia mentioned subtle banana flavor that is not overwhelmed by the chocolate. The loaf was done 5 minutes earlier than indicated in the recipe.

    • Melanie on August 21, 2015

      This was pretty good but I'm not convinced that it's the best banana chocolate bread. I preferred this on the first day or two.

    • twoyolks on April 24, 2017

      The linked recipe omits the amount of chocolate (100 g). This was a moist quick bread with a subtle banana flavor. It's not particularly sweet. Overall, it's well balanced but not superlative.

    • Zosia on May 13, 2015

      Moist and buttery loaf with a soft crumb and excellent banana flavour that isn't overwhelmed by the chocolate. I recommend weighing the bananas as my 3 medium came up 80g short. Fortunately, I had a stash in the freezer to make up the balance. The loaf took 20 minutes longer to bake in my oven (to reach internal temp of 200F).

    • clcorbi on October 23, 2017

      Really nice. I didn't have muscovado sugar, so I substituted brown sugar and stirred in an extra tablespoon of molasses. This isn't my favorite banana bread I've ever had, but it was definitely tasty and low-effort. I will also note I had to bake this for at least 10 extra minutes before it was set all the way through.

  • Poached scrambled eggs [Daniel Patterson]

    • Astrid5555 on April 19, 2015

      Interesting technique that works. Needs some accompaniment like hot sauce or at least some olive oil to not taste bland.

  • Potato scallion cakes (Fritterra) [Bert Greene]

    • Astrid5555 on January 08, 2017

      Excellent way of using up some leftover potato mash. I made a big mistake though when after boiling the scallions I thought it would be quicker to use the food processor instead of cutting them by hand. I ended up with scallion mash which made my potato mash mixture even more liquid. However, I was still able to fry some patties and everybody liked them a lot. Inspired by the picture in the book I served the little cakes with fried eggs for dinner. Will make again and follow the recipe next time.

  • Purple plum torte [Marian Burros]

    • Astrid5555 on October 05, 2015

      This is probably the quickest plum cake ever to make! Cream butter and sugar, dump in all the other ingredients, mix, top with plums and into the oven it goes! From start to finish in under an hour, since my cake was ready already after 30 minutes. Delicious!

    • Livmichelle on June 28, 2017

      made this with plums from our tree. Super easy, still tart the plums need lots of sugar and very good with Ice cream!

  • Cauliflower soup [Paul Bertolli]

    • adrienneyoung on September 01, 2017

      Extremely simple. Needs careful salting. Could be a good foil for some simple adds: a drizzle of hazelnut oil. Or a bit of crumbled blue cheese.

    • Laraaline on June 01, 2015

      This soup was perfect and incredibly delicious. I didn't add the last H20 at the end, as the soup seemed already to be at the right consistency and thickness.

  • Roasted applesauce [Judy Rodgers]

    • Melanie on June 14, 2015

      This applesauce is great! Incredibly simple but delicious served as a compote with breakfast, made two weeks in a row. The second time I made this I cooked it for longer at lower temperature and the apples were more caramelised.

    • stockholm28 on December 27, 2015

      This is a really delicious applesauce. The roasting really brings out the flavor of the apples. It is like apple pie filling.

  • Olive oil & maple granola [Nekisia Davis]

    • Melanie on August 21, 2015

      Great flavour with a mix of sweet and savoury notes. Very rich, not one for everyday eating.

    • stockholm28 on January 02, 2016

      Excellent granola. Olive oil and maple syrup give it a unique taste. It keeps well.

    • Lepa on December 25, 2016

      We love this and have been making it regularly to eat with plain yogurt. Take my advice and stir it right before taking it out of the oven (or right after) or it will harden into one large bar that sticks to the pan and is exceedingly difficult to remove. We were using meat hammers and butter knives to remove it last night! This hasn't happened before so I don't think it's a problem with the recipe, just a problem in execution that you should keep in mind.

    • Frogcake on May 11, 2016

      I love this granola recipe. I make it once a week for my family. They often eat it "wear coast style", topped with a scoop of probiotic plain yoghurt and fresh fruit.

  • Spiced braised lentils & tomatoes with toasted coconut [Melissa Clark]

    • Melanie on April 27, 2015

      Delicious - this dish has lovely layered flavours due to the way the dish is cooked, and it is so easy to make! Possibly too much tomato flavour for my partner, but I thought it was great as the coriander and yoghurt helps offset the richness of the lentils.

    • stockholm28 on December 02, 2015

      This was certainly a weeknight friendly dish and it also a very flavorful vegetarian main. Each bowl is topped with 2 tsps of butter. I thought about omitting the butter, but it definitely added a little something something. The dish tasted richer and smoother. Yes, everything is better with butter. I don't think I've ever "braised" lentils before and this certainly had great depth of flavor. Is it genius? Not so sure, but I liked the dish. This also appears on p 275 of Melissa Clark's "Cook This Now".

  • Green lentil salad [Patricia Wells]

    • Melanie on June 14, 2015

      This salad is delicious. Very easy to make, simple flavours, but not too plain.

  • Cranberry sauce [Daniel Humm]

    • twoyolks on November 24, 2017

      This was fine. I much prefer a cooked sauce.

  • Carnitas [Diana Kennedy]

    • PinchOfSalt on May 23, 2016

      I made this with some locally-raised pork. It was perfect! The braising phase took longer than expected, but I made up for that by shortening the crisping phase. This is definitely a "genius" recipe.

    • Zosia on December 08, 2015

      The technique worked perfectly and the amount of salt was just right for 1.8kg meat.

  • Classic guacamole [Roberto Santibañez]

    • amoule on July 04, 2016

      IMPORTANT NOTE: There is far too much salt in this as written. Instead of 1/2 Tablespoon of salt, try just 1/2 teaspoon. Otherwise, very good.

    • Lepa on July 22, 2016

      The whole family LOVES this guacamole recipe.

  • Touch-of-grace biscuits [Shirley Corriher]

    • stockholm28 on January 02, 2016

      These were very moist and tender biscuits. They were best right out of the oven.

  • English porridge [April Bloomfield]

    • stockholm28 on April 16, 2016

      I've never loved oatmeal; it is just something that I tolerate from time to time. The only way I generally eat oatmeal is if I have lots of toppings to disguise the mush. This porridge was delicious. I thought it would be too salty. It wasn't because the sugar really balanced it out. It reminded me of an oatmeal cookie. I think April has converted me to a porridge fan. Definitely a keeper and the only way I will make oatmeal in the future.

    • damazinah on August 09, 2015

      cut salt by half

  • Bar nuts [Union Square Café]

    • stockholm28 on February 07, 2016

      These are outstanding. I used a 1 pound bag of raw mixed nuts from Trader Joes and added 4 oz of unsalted peanuts. The nuts are roasted for 10 minutes and then tossed with a mixture of melted butter, brown sugar, salt, cayenne, and fresh rosemary. I served them as nibbles before a dinner that I hosted. While they were fabulous on the day made, they were still delicious on the next day. I took the leftovers into the office the next day and several of my coworkers asked for the recipe.

    • Barb_N on December 24, 2016

      Delicious and easy. I started with less than half the cayenne then adjusted the seasonings after mixing everthing together.

    • clcorbi on December 18, 2016

      These are delicious! I used only a pound of nuts, but kept all the seasoning proportions the same except for the salt, which I decreased by half a teaspoon. When the warmed butter mixture first hit the nuts, the rosemary smell was overwhelming, which made me scared these would taste like potpurri. Not so! I know the cookbook says to serve these warm, but I found them to be the most tasty and balanced once they cooled down.

  • No-knead bread [Jim Lahey]

    • stockholm28 on December 13, 2015

      I know I am late to the party on this, but this recipe is truly genius. I've made bread recipes with a long rise before, but I have never gotten bread with such a crisp crust. Cooking in the dutch oven is a brilliant idea. This recipe was easy; the most difficult step was gettig the risen dough off the towel and into the hot Dutch oven.

    • swegener on May 15, 2015

      The bread really stuck to the cloth--even with the flour--may try cornmeal next time.

    • Frogcake on April 01, 2016

      I've been baking bread this way for several years now. So easy, so delicious. I hardly ever buy bread from the grocery store.

    • Frogcake on May 11, 2016

      I always fold the dough several times, turning it; then turn it into a bowl lined with parchment. Then once it has rested, I lift the parchment with dough into the pre heated Dutch oven. This really simplifies the dough transfer into the Dutch oven.

  • Grilled cheese sandwiches [Gabrielle Hamilton]

    • stockholm28 on December 06, 2015

      I'd read about using mayo in lieu of butter to make grilled cheese but was a skeptic. I thought I'd miss the butter flavor and mayo and cheese didn't really appeal to me. There is really no mayo flavor in the resulting sandwich and this does produce a really nice crust. I used Cabot Seriously Sharp Cheddar, Jewish Rye bread from the bakery that sells at my local farmer's market, and Hellman's mayonnaise. Great sandwich. I was surprised by the amount of oil left in the pan after I cooked the grilled cheese. If you don't make mayo regularly, you forget that it is mostly oil. I'd use this technique again. This was a very good sandwich and would be a great technique if you were making grilled cheese for a crowd because the mayo is easier to work with than melted butter and it browns more evenly.

    • Zosia on March 01, 2016

      This method also works perfectly with fat reduced (50%) mayo.

  • Roasted Brussels sprouts with fish sauce vinaigrette [David Chang]

    • stockholm28 on December 09, 2015

      This one is a real keeper for me. Maybe it is even (dare I say it) genius. The fish sauce vinaigrette is comprised of fish sauce, water, rice wine vinegar, lime, sugar, garlic, bird's eye chili, cilantro stems, and mint. Sweet, spicy, salty, umami, yummy. I used a bit more lime than the recipe called for just because I like more lime. The sprouts are roasted and tossed in the vinaigrette. The recipe is simple. The hardest part was getting the brussels sprouts in the pan cut side down.

    • Zosia on March 11, 2016

      The recipe is also delicious made with soy sauce for a vegetarian version.

  • Spiced red wine (Ypocras) [Anne Willan]

    • stockholm28 on December 13, 2015

      This is very sweet and the spices are anything but subtle. It contains a whole cup of brown sugar. The spices include ground cinnamon, ground cloves, ground mace, grains of paradise. Although I liked this, it won't replace my favorite Swedish glögg recipe.

  • Spicy tomato soup [Barbara Lynch]

    • stockholm28 on December 06, 2015

      This is a perfectly acceptable tomato soup, but adding red pepper flakes to what is a very basic tomato soup does not raise the soup to a genius level in my opinion. My red pepper flakes were very fresh and the resulting soup definitely had some kick. I did strain the soup and I think this helped. Mostly seeds were left in the strainer. Straining gave it a soup "mouth-feel" rather than a sauce "mouth-feel". I froze the leftovers in 1 cup portions so will be eating this again this winter.

  • Mushroom Bourguignon [Deb Perelman]

    • stockholm28 on December 07, 2015

      This was very good in a comfort food kind of way, but I thought it was missing a little something ... not sure what though. I have a beef in red wine stew recipe that I really like and it adds a little soy sauce at the end, so I might try that in the future. I also thought the red wine didn't really come through as much as I'd like. I used half portobellos, half creminis. I served this over egg noodles and liked the dollop of sour cream to make it like a stroganoff. All in all, it is a good cold weather dish and I will probably make it again.

  • Whole wheat chocolate chip cookies [Kim Boyce]

    • macfadden on March 30, 2017

      Don't be deterred by the mysterious cold butter instructions; it works fine. The dough looks dry at first but it all works out. My only modification is to leave the dough in the fridge overnight, which improves cookies generally and whole wheat ones in particular. I took them out of the oven when they were browned around the edges but very soft in the middle, and this produced a delicious, chewy cookie. Resident tester said there was no reason to go back to chocolate chip cookies made with all-purpose flour.

    • clcorbi on December 11, 2016

      Made for our Christmas cookie tray--this is my second time making these cookies, we really enjoy them. The recipe as written makes a HUGE amount of cookies, so I halved it this time. I love how chewy and substantial these are, and the subtle nutty flavor from the whole wheat flour. A definite favorite.

  • Grilled pork burgers [Suzanne Goin]

    • Zosia on May 24, 2015

      Fantastic juicy and flavourful burger with the romesco topping adding a wonderful smoky flavour. The aioli was somewhat lost so I don't think I'll make that again and the cheese, too, wasn't noticeable. I used only half the oil for the romesco, enough to make it a loose but spreadable consistency, and made 8 burgers.

    • sosayi on July 17, 2017

      Pretty much agree with all of Zosia's comments now that I see them! Easily makes 8 burgers, not 6. Absolutely delicious, and very glad I have a few extra burgers in the freezer (uncooked, we only needed 4) for a future meal. I didn't make the aioli. Regular mayonnaise worked fine, as the flavor was hidden under deliciousness that was the Romesco sauce. You could leave that and the Manchego off, most likely, and it would still be incredible.

  • Meatballs [Rao's]

    • Zosia on July 21, 2017

      The ingredients were familiar but the proportions were a surprise, especially the 2 cups each of breadcrumbs and water. The meatballs turned out perfectly, incredibly moist and tender with a great meaty flavour. Uncooked, they were very soft and fragile and though I normally brown meatballs under the broiler, I thought these needed the crust that can only be achieved with frying to prevent them from disintegrating in the sauce so that's what I did (quite messy because of the high water content) and they stayed intact.

  • Kale salad [Northern Spy Food Co.]

    • ksg518 on March 03, 2017

      This is a good kale salad. We used butternut squash. Thinly slicing the kale means you don't need to massage it.

  • Red salad [Fergus Henderson]

    • ksg518 on July 19, 2016

      This is a wonderful summer salad! Some of the reviews on the Food 52 website complain that it's not very flavorful and I agree that it's very mild. Perhaps next time I'll add another beet. But it is a very refreshing salad for a hot summer day that won't overpower anything else you're serving.

  • Kale panini [Andrea Reusing]

    • ksg518 on July 26, 2016

      When your CSA gives you kale for six weeks in a row, you need new recipes. I thought this was very good. The peppers provide a great zing to combat the heaviness of the kale and the feta. Note that the linked recipe calls for mild peppers but the version in the book provides for pickling your own peppers. We pickled some small sweet peppers but purchasing them would obviously work too. A hardy bread is a must here.

    • Lepa on August 31, 2017

      I enjoyed this. I used hot peppers. FWIW, I made one large sandwich with one bunch of kale. It had a lot of greens on it, but it's hard to imagine that two bunches would really make four sandwiches.

  • Chickpea stew with saffron, yogurt & garlic [Heidi Swanson]

    • Pamelarm on September 28, 2016

      Agree with Lepa on this... I added potatoes, which added some substance. Tasty, but not amazing.

    • Lepa on July 22, 2016

      Genius? Not really. A satisfying meal? Yes. On the repeat list? Not sure.

  • Currant cottage cheese pancakes [Deborah Madison]

    • Lepa on July 22, 2016

      I thought these were good. Not sure they will go into the regular rotation but a nice change.

  • Deviled eggs [Virginia Willis]

    • Lepa on July 22, 2016

      This is my favorite recipe in this book. The fluffy filling and tarragon put over the top. AMAZING.

  • Radicchio salad with Manchego vinaigrette [Toro Bravo]

    • Lepa on July 22, 2016

      I love raddichio and bitter flavors but for some reason this vinaigrette emphasized the bitterness instead of taming/balancing it out. We were disappointed, as it sounded so good.

    • lesliec on November 06, 2016

      I really liked this salad. Soaking the radicchio in cold water definitely helps ease the bitterness. The dressing and manchego complemented the radicchio well. I would not hesitate to make this again.

  • Wild & white rice salad [Viana La Place & Evan Kleiman]

    • Lepa on July 22, 2016

      This was good but terrible as a leftover, when the flavors all blended together and became muddy and unappealing.

  • Dense chocolate loaf cake [Nigella Lawson]

    • Lepa on July 22, 2016

      I thought this was too simple and sweet. I wanted something with more depth/flavor. That didn't keep me from eating it but not sure I'll make it again.

    • clcorbi on July 26, 2017

      I have never tried the recipe as written; both times I've made it, I've substituted coffee for water, and substituted some of the flour for extra cocoa powder. Oh, and I've also made this with brown sugar rather than white. With those changes, this cake is excellent; it isn't the most chocolatey cake you'll ever eat, but it's delicious with whipped cream and is very moist.

  • Salt-baked herbed salmon with red onion-caper vinaigrette [Cory Schreiber]

    • Frogcake on June 05, 2016

      This technique has changed the way I cook salmon. It is unbelievable how moist and flavourful the fish is when it is salt-baked. I have made this several times and agree that the skin is too salty to eat if the salt is finer. However my family tends not to eat the skin anyway. I also tried baking a whole fish on a bed of salt with a salt blanket. Muy Bueno! Wonderful technique! The vinaigrette is also very flavourful.

  • Dry-brined turkey (a.k.a.the Judy bird) [Russ Parsons]

    • Frogcake on May 11, 2016

      Yes!!! I learned about this technique from the Zuni cookbook and everyone always asks me for my recipe! I grew up eating leather-dry turkey - I knew there had to be a better way! This is a fab recipe, no fail with moist juicy meat and the crispest skin you've ever tasted. Try making it with Judy's bread salad, using champagne vinegar. Having eaten the real thing at Zuni I am proud to say that my version is not that much different! Thank you, Judy!

  • Ginger fried rice [Jean-Georges Vongerichten & Mark Bittman]

    • Frogcake on May 16, 2016

      This is another family favourite in this book. So easy and so delicious. Great way to use up a big nub of ginger. We love the taste combination of fried garlic and ginger pieces. I often serve this with a big stack of chopped baby bok Choy.

  • Perfect pan-seared steaks [J. Kenji López-Alt]

    • clcorbi on February 13, 2017

      Made for our early Valentine's Day dinner--I have never actually cooked a steak before, and so was very excited to try this method out. We used a fairly thick steak--about 1.5"--and salted it for 3 hours before cooking. I don't own a meat thermometer, so I sort of had to wing the cook time. I ended up flipping the steak for 7 minutes (Kenji suggests 6-12), before adding the butter, thyme and 1 sliced shallot and cooking for the additional 2 minutes. The shallot immediately caramelized in the intensely hot pan, and between that and the thyme, the kitchen could not have smelled more delicious. After the extra 2 minutes I pulled the steak onto a plate, drizzled it with the shallot/butter/thyme drippings, and tented it for about 5 minutes before cutting. Happily, the steak was a perfect medium-rare, cooked exactly to our liking. It was perfectly seasoned and the caramelized shallots were absolutely scrumptious--I'd almost want to throw in more next time, they were such a treat. Delicious!

  • Garlic green beans [Penelope Casas]

    • clcorbi on August 02, 2017

      These are easy and fairly tasty. I enjoyed the buttery flavor, but I prefer my green beans with a bit more crunch, and with this stewing technique they of course became quite soft. Still, the garlic butter flavor was very nice. I will note that you do need to mince the garlic, not just crush it per the instructions. The photo shows bits of minced garlic mixed in with the green beans, which works to distribute the garlicky flavor throughout.

  • Potato soup with fried almonds [Anya Von Bremzen]

    • sosayi on December 07, 2017

      I just finished my leftovers of this soup for lunch, and I'm already sad. Absolutely the best potato soup I've ever made/had, no question. Mine looked very similar to the photo above, but slightly creamier, as I mashed up my potato pieces a bit more at the end. So much flavor, though, from such simple ingredients. I loved the almond/garlic/sherry vinegar garnish, and the body of the soup was so complex. I'm dreaming of this.

  • Raised waffles [Marion Cunningham]

    • Livmichelle on June 28, 2017

      didn't turn out that great. Need to try with new Belgian style waffle maker

  • Black pepper tofu [Yotam Ottolenghi]

    • Livmichelle on June 28, 2017

      cooked this from the plenty cookbook, very very very good! can hold back on the butter

  • Sweet corn & black raspberry ice cream [Jeni Britton Bauer]

    • Livmichelle on June 30, 2017

      Wow! I was not expecting a strong corn flavor m, different and good. The sauce was too thick I didn't cook it to 220 but close

  • Spicy sauce

    • BeckyLeJ on December 09, 2017

      I love that this was, as described, a sauce I could make with things I had in hand, I also love that it’s flexible in that you can use any pickled peppers - which means I can vary the flavor and heat a bit with each new batch. It’s paired with poached eggs in the book, but I made mine to go with cheesy soft scrambled eggs, which was also a nice pairing for the sauce.

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Reviews about this book

  • Food52

    Picked for Food52's December 2017 Cookbook Club.

    Full review
  • Everyday Annie

    This book is full of incredibly doable recipes, things that you want to make and can, right this instant! Most of the recipes are quite simple with short ingredient lists.

    Full review
  • San Francisco Chronicle

    Best Cookbooks of 2015: ...she’s collected recipes that she believes will make you change how you cook simply because the new way is better, easier or more interesting...

    Full review

Reviews about Recipes in this Book

  • ISBN 10 1607747979
  • ISBN 13 9781607747970
  • Linked ISBNs
  • Published Apr 07 2015
  • Format Hardcover
  • Page Count 272
  • Language English
  • Countries United States
  • Publisher Ten Speed Press
  • Imprint Food52 Works

Publishers Text

There are good recipes and there are great ones—and then, there are genius recipes.

Genius recipes surprise us and make us rethink the way we cook. They might involve an unexpectedly simple technique, debunk a kitchen myth, or apply a familiar ingredient in a new way. They’re handed down by luminaries of the food world and become their legacies. And, once we’ve folded them into our repertoires, they make us feel pretty genius too. In this collection are 100 of the smartest and most remarkable ones.

There isn’t yet a single cookbook where you can find Marcella Hazan’s Tomato Sauce with Onion and Butter, Jim Lahey’s No-Knead Bread, and Nigella Lawson’s Dense Chocolate Loaf Cake—plus dozens more of the most talked about, just-crazy-enough-to-work recipes of our time. Until now.

These are what Food52 Executive Editor Kristen Miglore calls genius recipes. Passed down from the cookbook authors, chefs, and bloggers who made them legendary, these foolproof recipes rethink cooking tropes, solve problems, get us talking, and make cooking more fun. Every week, Kristen features one such recipe and explains just what’s so brilliant about it in the James Beard Award-nominated Genius Recipes column on Food52. Here, in this book, she compiles 100 of the most essential ones—nearly half of which have never been featured in the column—with tips, riffs, mini-recipes, and stunning photographs from James Ransom, to create a cooking canon that will stand the test of time.

Once you try Michael Ruhlman’s fried chicken or Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi’s hummus, you’ll never want to go back to other versions. But there’s also a surprising ginger juice you didn’t realize you were missing and will want to put on everything—and a way to cook white chocolate that (finally) exposes its hidden glory. Some of these recipes you’ll follow to a T, but others will be jumping-off points for you to experiment with and make your own. Either way, with Kristen at the helm, revealing and explaining the genius of each recipe, Genius Recipes is destined to become every home cook’s go-to resource for smart, memorable cooking—because no one cook could have taught us so much.



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